Special Issue "Vibration Serviceability of Civil Engineering Structures"

A special issue of Vibration (ISSN 2571-631X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stana Živanović
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF, UK
Interests: structural engineering; light-weight structures; vibration serviceability; dynamic loading by humans; human-structure interaction; whole body vibration exposure in civil engineering structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue and create impact on developing the Vibration as a medium for discussing and advancing the work in our research field.

Vibration serviceability limit state is increasingly governing the design of contemporary, typically light-weight, lightly-damped and low-frequency, civil engineering structures. To successfully address this challenge, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of the uncertainties and variabilities in dynamic loading, structure models, and user response to (and interaction with) vibrating structures.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present state-of-the-art experimental and numerical research in vibration serviceability of civil engineering structures. The topics to be covered include:

  • Modelling dynamic loading scenarios and resulting forces, especially those generated by human actions;
  • Characterizing the dynamics of civil engineering structures;
  • Quantifying influence of uncertainties and/or variabilities in loading and structure properties on the vibration response;
  • Developing models for human–human and human–structure interactions;
  • Establishing criteria for vibration receivers (such as humans and vibration sensitive facilities).

Contributions related to development of novel experimental techniques relevant for the advancement of any stage of vibration serviceability evaluation and characterizations of human response to (not only) vibration in a multi-sensory environment are particularly welcome.

Vibration (ISSN 2571-631X) is dedicated to the scientifically-rigorous dissemination of peer-reviewed publications pertinent to vibration science and engineering. All accepted manuscripts submitted in 2018 will be published in open access, with article processing charges (APCs) waived.

Dr. Stana Živanović
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vibration is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Vibration performance
  • Civil engineering structures (e.g., footbridges, floors, stadia and staircases)
  • Vibration source
  • Human–structure and human–human interactions
  • Uncertainty
  • Vibration criteria

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Sensitivity of the Vertical Response of Footbridges to the Frequency Variability of Crossing Pedestrians
Vibration 2018, 1(2), 290-311; https://doi.org/10.3390/vibration1020020 - 30 Nov 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Contemporary design codes and guides for vibration serviceability assessment include some simplifications in load modelling. The same statistical distribution of the inter-pedestrian variability of the step interval (frequency) is proposed for all applications. Moreover, walking loads are considered to be periodic. The intra-pedestrian [...] Read more.
Contemporary design codes and guides for vibration serviceability assessment include some simplifications in load modelling. The same statistical distribution of the inter-pedestrian variability of the step interval (frequency) is proposed for all applications. Moreover, walking loads are considered to be periodic. The intra-pedestrian variability of the step interval is neglected. A more realistic load modelling trying to overcome the limitations of the codes is intended in this paper. Instead of a single mean value of the inter-pedestrian distribution of walking speed, a range of possible variation, which account for the real variations that occur in practice depending on the footbridge location and usage, is considered. An enhanced model is proposed in this paper to reproduce statistically both the intra- and inter-pedestrian variability of the step interval as a function of the walking speed distribution. This innovative model is then applied to study the sensitivity of the vertical response of footbridges to the variability of the step interval and to evaluate the influence of the aforementioned simplifications on the predicted characteristic responses. For this purpose, low-frequency footbridges excited by single-pedestrian crossings are chosen. The response is statistically characterized through Monte Carlo numerical simulations including 720 different configurations and 10,000 load cases in each configuration. Results of the study provide an overview of the influence of the footbridge and load parameters on the responses, which can be useful in practical applications where human–structure interactions are negligible. As for the simplifications of the codes, it is found that either using a single distribution to model the inter-pedestrian variability of the spatiotemporal parameters or neglecting the intra-pedestrian variability can lead to a significant underestimation of the characteristic response of footbridges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibration Serviceability of Civil Engineering Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Motion-Based Design of Passive Damping Devices to Mitigate Wind-Induced Vibrations in Stay Cables
Vibration 2018, 1(2), 269-289; https://doi.org/10.3390/vibration1020019 - 12 Nov 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Wind action can induce large amplitude vibrations in the stay cables of bridges. To reduce the vibration level of these structural elements, different types of passive damping devices are usually installed. In this paper, a motion-based design method is proposed and implemented in [...] Read more.
Wind action can induce large amplitude vibrations in the stay cables of bridges. To reduce the vibration level of these structural elements, different types of passive damping devices are usually installed. In this paper, a motion-based design method is proposed and implemented in order to achieve the optimum design of different passive damping devices for stay cables under wind action. According to this method, the design problem is transformed into an optimization problem. Thus, its main aim is to minimize the different terms of a multi-objective function, considering as design variables the characteristic parameters of each considered passive damping device. The multi-objective function is defined in terms of the scaled characteristic parameters, one single-function for each parameter, and an additional function that checks the compliance of the considered design criterion. Genetic algorithms are considered as a global optimization method. Three passive damping devices have been studied herein: viscous, elastomeric and friction dampers. As a benchmark structure, the Alamillo bridge (Seville, Spain), is considered in order to validate the performance of the proposed method. Finally, the parameters of the damping devices designed according to this proposal are successfully compared with the results provided by a conventional design method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibration Serviceability of Civil Engineering Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
A Robust Methodology for the Reconstruction of the Vertical Pedestrian-Induced Load from the Registered Body Motion
Vibration 2018, 1(2), 250-268; https://doi.org/10.3390/vibration1020018 - 07 Nov 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper proposes a methodology to reconstruct the vertical GRFs from the registered body motion that is reasonably robust against measurement noise. The vertical GRFs are reconstructed from the experimentally identified time-variant pacing rate and a generalised single-step load model available in the [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a methodology to reconstruct the vertical GRFs from the registered body motion that is reasonably robust against measurement noise. The vertical GRFs are reconstructed from the experimentally identified time-variant pacing rate and a generalised single-step load model available in the literature. The proposed methodology only requires accurately capturing the body motion within the frequency range 1–10 Hz and does not rely on the exact magnitude of the registered signal. The methodology can therefore also be applied when low-cost sensors are used and to minimize the impact of soft-tissue artefacts. In addition, the proposed procedure can be applied regardless of the position of the sensor on the human body, as long as the recorded body motion allows for identifying the time of a nominally identical event in successive walking cycles. The methodology is illustrated by a numerical example and applied to an experimental dataset where the ground reaction forces and the body motion were registered simultaneously. The results show that the proposed methodology allows for arriving at a good estimate of the vertical ground reaction forces. When the impact of soft-tissue artefacts is low, a comparable estimate can be obtained using Newton’s second law of motion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibration Serviceability of Civil Engineering Structures)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Review of Pedestrian Load Models for Vibration Serviceability Assessment of Floor Structures
Vibration 2019, 2(1), 1-24; https://doi.org/10.3390/vibration2010001 - 25 Dec 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Innovative design and technological advancements in the construction industry have resulted in an increased use of large, slender and lightweight floors in contemporary office buildings. Compounded by an ever-increasing use of open-plan layouts with few internal partitions and thus lower damping, floor vibration [...] Read more.
Innovative design and technological advancements in the construction industry have resulted in an increased use of large, slender and lightweight floors in contemporary office buildings. Compounded by an ever-increasing use of open-plan layouts with few internal partitions and thus lower damping, floor vibration is becoming a governing limit state in the modern structural design originating from dynamic footfall excitations. This could cause annoyance and discomfort to building occupants as well as knock-on management and financial consequences for facility owners. This article presents a comprehensive review pertinent to walking-induced dynamic loading of low-frequency floor structures. It is intended to introduce and explain key walking parameters in the field as well as summarise the development of previous walking models and methods for vibration serviceability assessment. Although a number of walking models and design procedures have been proposed, the literature survey highlights that further work is required in the following areas; (1) the development of a probabilistic multi-person loading model which accounts for inter- and intra-subject variabilities, (2) the identification of walking paths (routes accounting for the effect of occupancy patterns on office floors) coupled with spatial distribution of pedestrians and (3) the production of a statistical spatial response approach for vibration serviceability assessment. A stochastic approach, capable of taking into account uncertainties in loading model and vibration responses, appears to be a more reliable way forward compared to the deterministic approaches of the past and there is a clear need for further research in this area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibration Serviceability of Civil Engineering Structures)
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