Special Issue "Comparative studies on Endocrine Diseases in Animals and Humans"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ir. J.A. Jan Mol
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: clinical endocrinology of companion animals; diabetes; hypothyroidism; hypoparathyroidism; reproduction physiology; hormone-producing or hormone-sensitive tumors; mammary-, prostate-, or thyroid-carcinoma; pituitary adenoma; insulinoma

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Animal health and human health are intimately linked to each other. Within the veterinary community, the One-Health concept is commonly accepted, but less well-known within the human medical community, which is much more familiar with all kind of rodent models than with the diseases of companion animals.

Nevertheless, it is my sincere conviction that cross-disciplinary research within comparative endocrinology of humans and (companion) animals with spontaneous endocrine diseases is beneficial for the wellbeing of both. It will improve and quicken the development of new therapies, especially in the new era of precision- or personalized medicine, made possible, amongst others, by the availability of the genomes of many species.

Funding of comparative research depends not only on the aspects of intrinsic value for the species studied, but often also on the benefit for human medicine. It is my wish that, together with all the experts within the veterinary community, we will be able to provide all the arguments to the scientific community as to why comparative endocrinology is so challenging.

Original manuscripts or reviews that address comparative aspects of endocrine diseases in animals are invited for this Special Issue.

Dr. Ir. J.A. Jan Mol
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Comparative endocrinology
  • endocrine diseases in companion animals
  • One-Health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessReview
Animal Models of Cancer-Associated Hypercalcemia
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4020021 - 13 Apr 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
Cancer-associated hypercalcemia (CAH) is a frequently-occurring paraneoplastic syndrome that contributes to substantial patient morbidity and occurs in both humans and animals. Patients with CAH are often characterized by markedly elevated serum calcium concentrations that result in a range of clinical symptoms involving the [...] Read more.
Cancer-associated hypercalcemia (CAH) is a frequently-occurring paraneoplastic syndrome that contributes to substantial patient morbidity and occurs in both humans and animals. Patients with CAH are often characterized by markedly elevated serum calcium concentrations that result in a range of clinical symptoms involving the nervous, gastrointestinal and urinary systems. CAH is caused by two principle mechanisms; humorally-mediated and/or through local osteolytic bone metastasis resulting in excessive calcium release from resorbed bone. Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM) is the most common mechanism and is due to the production and release of tumor-associated cytokines and humoral factors, such as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), that act at distant sites to increase serum calcium concentrations. Local osteolytic hypercalcemia (LOH) occurs when primary or metastatic bone tumors act locally by releasing factors that stimulate osteoclast activity and bone resorption. LOH is a less frequent cause of CAH and in some cases can induce hypercalcemia in concert with HHM. Rarely, ectopic production of parathyroid hormone has been described. PTHrP-mediated hypercalcemia is the most common mechanism of CAH in human and canine malignancies and is recognized in other domestic species. Spontaneous and experimentally-induced animal models have been developed to study the mechanisms of CAH. These models have been essential for the evaluation of novel approaches and adjuvant therapies to manage CAH. This review will highlight the comparative aspects of CAH in humans and animals with a discussion of the available animal models used to study the pathogenesis of this important clinical syndrome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comparative studies on Endocrine Diseases in Animals and Humans)
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Open AccessCase Report
Hyponatremia as the Presenting Feature of a Pituitary Abscess in a Calf
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4010008 - 06 Feb 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
A 2-month-old Simmental heifer presented for acute onset of neurological behavior. Laboratory tests confirmed the presence of hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and hypokalemia that improved with intravenous fluid therapy. Despite an initial cessation of neurological signs, symptoms re-emerged, and the heifer was euthanized due to [...] Read more.
A 2-month-old Simmental heifer presented for acute onset of neurological behavior. Laboratory tests confirmed the presence of hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and hypokalemia that improved with intravenous fluid therapy. Despite an initial cessation of neurological signs, symptoms re-emerged, and the heifer was euthanized due to poor prognosis. A pituitary abscess (Trueperella pyogenes) was observed on gross necropsy, suggesting that the effects of panhypopituitarism (inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and/or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) secretion) may have resulted in the clinical findings. Pituitary abscess syndrome carries a poor prognosis due to the inability to penetrate the area with systemic antibiotic therapy. These findings highlight the unusual clinical presentations that may occur following pituitary abscess syndrome in cattle that practitioners need to consider when determining prognosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comparative studies on Endocrine Diseases in Animals and Humans)
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