Special Issue "Urban Futures—Landscape"

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 September 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Molinari Carla Website E-Mail
Landscape and Urban Design, University of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, UK
Interests: design methods in landscape architecture; perception of space and time in landscape; architecture and cinema; history of landscape architecture
Guest Editor
Dr. David Buck Website E-Mail
Landscape Architecture, University of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, UK
Interests: music and landscape architecture; landscape temporal notation; landscape representation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This conference calls on landscape architects, art and architectural historians and theorists, architects, urban planners and designers, to analyse the concept of landscape of the past, critique the present, and inform the future.

Cities are constantly growing, overloaded by images and inputs, and the areas between urban and rural environments are left to change without clear visions, the relationships between human beings and nature are always more hidden and complicated, natural areas are disappearing or have been transformed in protected untouchable open-air museums, even sustainability itself seems at times to already be an old fashion trend, while the rhythm of our life is increasing constantly.

In this context, what is the new meaning of landscape and how are human beings creating new relationships with nature? As the poet Antonio Machado noted, “there are no paths, paths are made by walking” and this conference will try to answer these questions defining the landscape as social, economic, political, artistic, design, historic, and theoretical products of its own era and identifying its transformations, from the past to the future.

Trying to focus on the concept of landscape broadly, the conference will produce interdisciplinary and innovative discussions related to the topic. Within this framework, the conference welcomes international and national researchers, from academic and professional environments, who are related to the concept of landscape and want to help in figuring out its future.

Dr. Molinari Carla
Dr. David Buck
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • landscape design
  • sustainability
  • ecology
  • urban phenomena
  • rural areas
  • human beings and nature
  • experience and perception
  • space and time
  • landscape architecture projects
  • social practices

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Urban Land-Use Dynamics in the Niger Delta: The Case of Greater Port Harcourt Watershed
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(4), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2040108 - 20 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cities in developing countries are urbanising at a rapid rate, resulting in substantial pressures on environmental systems. Among the main factors that lead to flooding, controlling land-use change offers the greatest scope for the management of risk. However, traditional analysis of a “from–to” [...] Read more.
Cities in developing countries are urbanising at a rapid rate, resulting in substantial pressures on environmental systems. Among the main factors that lead to flooding, controlling land-use change offers the greatest scope for the management of risk. However, traditional analysis of a “from–to” change matrix is not adequate to provide information of all the land-use changes that occur in a watershed. In this study, an in-depth analysis of land-use change enabled us to quantify the bulk of the changes accumulating from swap changes in a tropical watershed. This study assessed the historical and future land-use/land-cover (LULC) dynamics in the River State region of the Niger Delta. Land-use classification and change detection analysis was conducted using multi-source (Landsat TM, ETM, polygon map, and hard copy) data of the study area for 1986, 1995, and 2003, and projected conditions in 2060. The key findings indicate that historical urbanisation was rapid; urban expansion could increase by 80% in 2060 due to planned urban development; and 95% of the conversions to urban land occurred chiefly at the expense of agricultural land. Urban land was dominated by net changes rather than swap changes, which in the future could amplify flood risk and have other severe implications for the watershed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Futures—Landscape)
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Open AccessArticle
A Method for Mapping Future Urbanization in the United States
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2020040 - 24 Apr 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Cities are poised to absorb additional people. Their sustainability, or ability to accommodate a population increase without depleting resources or compromising future growth, depends on whether they harness the efficiency gains from urban land management. Population is often projected as a bulk national [...] Read more.
Cities are poised to absorb additional people. Their sustainability, or ability to accommodate a population increase without depleting resources or compromising future growth, depends on whether they harness the efficiency gains from urban land management. Population is often projected as a bulk national number without details about spatial distribution. We use Landsat and population data in a methodology to project and map U.S. urbanization for the year 2020 and document its spatial pattern. This methodology is important to spatially disaggregate projected population and assist land managers to monitor land use, assess infrastructure and distribute resources. We found the U.S. west coast urban areas to have the fastest population growth with relatively small land consumption resulting in future decrease in per capita land use. Except for Miami (FL), most other U.S. large urban areas, especially in the Midwest, are growing spatially faster than their population and inadvertently consuming land needed for ecosystem services. In large cities, such as New York, Chicago, Houston and Miami, land development is expected more in suburban zones than urban cores. In contrast, in Los Angeles land development within the city core is greater than in its suburbs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Futures—Landscape)
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