Special Issue "Inducing-Toxicity in the Neurological System by Environmental Pollutants"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2022 | Viewed by 980

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Irene Camacho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Life Sciences, Madeira University, Campus Universitário da Penteada, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
Interests: air pollution; environmental allergens; air quality; aerobiology
Dr. Isabel Fragoeiro
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Escola Superior de Saúde, Madeira University, Campus Universitário da Penteada, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
Interests: mental health; nursing; aging and elderly; community mental health
Dr. Daniel Neto
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Chronic Diseases Research Center CEDOC, NOVA Medical School, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campo Martires da Patria 130, P-1169056 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: psychiatry; mental disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the recent advances in knowledge, there are still many gaps in the information about pollution and its effects on human health. These gaps include poor knowledge of the toxic effects of many chemicals in common use and the causal link between pollution and dysfunction of the central nervous system.

Exposure to neurotoxic pollutants is widespread as a result of fossil fuel combustion, industrial and agricultural production, and the extensive use of toxic chemicals in consumer products.

Pollutants can be toxic to the developing brain, and several commonly used chemicals, whose neurotoxicity has not yet been described, could be causing damage to children but also the elderly population.

Recent evidence suggests that additional causal associations may exist between particulate matter pollution and several prevalent non-communicable diseases. These include decreased cognitive function, attention-deficit, dyslexia, behavioral disorders and autism in children, and neurodegenerative diseases, including dementia, in adults. Previous epidemiologic studies have identified several neurological diseases associated with air pollution. Air pollution and, especially, traffic-related air pollution seem to increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and diverse neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperreactivity disorder, learning and intellectual disabilities and schizophrenia. Many neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder, result from complex interactions between environmental factors and genetic susceptibilities. These conditions exact a tremendous cost on the affected individuals, their families and society, motivating support for research.

The purpose of this Special Issue of Toxics is to increase the insights into underexplored environmental pollutants that are affecting human health. We are pleased to invite you to submit original papers, reviews and short communications that focus on single or complex pollutants and their impacts on neurological systems. The articles may span from epidemiological to molecular aspects of the main theme and propose exposure threshold limits for health surveillance purposes.

The research areas related to novel air pollutants may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Exposomes;
  • Pollution sources;
  • Susceptibility profiles;
  • The mechanisms of the toxic actions of pollutants;
  • In vivo, in vitro and in silico studies;
  • Field and laboratory approaches;
  • Emerging toxicity models;
  • Health impact assessments;
  • Short- and long-term effects;
  • Biomarkers of exposure/effects;
  • Preventive/mitigation strategies for pollutant exposure.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Irene Camacho
Dr. Isabel Fragoeiro
Dr. Daniel Neto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • environmental pollutants
  • mental disorders
  • neurodegenerative disease
  • neurological disorders
  • neuropathological risk
  • neurological system
  • public health
  • toxicology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Environmentally Toxic Solid Nanoparticles in Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Nuclei and Cerebellum of Metropolitan Mexico City Children and Young Adults with Neural Quadruple Misfolded Protein Pathologies and High Exposures to Nano Particulate Matter
Toxics 2022, 10(4), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10040164 - 29 Mar 2022
Viewed by 834
Abstract
Quadruple aberrant hyperphosphorylated tau, beta-amyloid, α-synuclein and TDP-43 neuropathology and metal solid nanoparticles (NPs) are documented in the brains of children and young adults exposed to Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) pollution. We investigated environmental NPs reaching noradrenergic and dopaminergic nuclei and the cerebellum [...] Read more.
Quadruple aberrant hyperphosphorylated tau, beta-amyloid, α-synuclein and TDP-43 neuropathology and metal solid nanoparticles (NPs) are documented in the brains of children and young adults exposed to Metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) pollution. We investigated environmental NPs reaching noradrenergic and dopaminergic nuclei and the cerebellum and their associated ultrastructural alterations. Here, we identify NPs in the locus coeruleus (LC), substantia nigrae (SN) and cerebellum by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) in 197 samples from 179 MMC residents, aged 25.9 ± 9.2 years and seven older adults aged 63 ± 14.5 years. Fe, Ti, Hg, W, Al and Zn spherical and acicular NPs were identified in the SN, LC and cerebellar neural and vascular mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, neuromelanin, heterochromatin and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) along with early and progressive neurovascular damage and cerebellar endothelial erythrophagocytosis. Strikingly, FeNPs 4 ± 1 nm and Hg NPs 8 ± 2 nm were seen predominantly in the LC and SN. Nanoparticles could serve as a common denominator for misfolded proteins and could play a role in altering and obstructing NPCs. The NPs/carbon monoxide correlation is potentially useful for evaluating early neurodegeneration risk in urbanites. Early life NP exposures pose high risk to brains for development of lethal neurologic outcomes. NP emissions sources ought to be clearly recognized, regulated, and monitored; future generations are at stake. Full article
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