Environmental Contaminants Exposure and Children Health Risk Assessment

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Exposome Analysis and Risk Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2024 | Viewed by 2570

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: exposure assessment; health risk assessment; cumulative risk; cancer risk; environmental contaminants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Children are sensitive to environmental pollutants exposure, due to their higher intake rate and low excretion rate of pollutants, as well as immature development. Also, due to their special behavior patterns, such as frequent hand-to-mouth behavior, children are easily exposed to environmental pollutants through various exposure pathways via multiple environmental media, consequently creating health risks for them. To protect the health of children, it is important to assess the exposure and health risk to children from environmental pollutants. However, characterizing environmental exposure and children’s health risks from environmental contaminants remains a challenging field in environmental health. Thus, new methodologies, models, and applications are needed to develop our understanding and management of environmental health risks. This Special Issue aims to provide a platform for researchers and practitioners to disseminate their new findings and understandings in relation to environmental contaminants exposure and children health risk assessments. The topics may include but are not limited to:

  1. Field investigation of contaminants in children’s living environmental surroundings;
  2. Case studies of risks from environmental contaminants in multiple environmental media, including air, water, food, soil dust, etc.;
  3. Precise assessment of exposure to environmental pollutants via specific environmental media;
  4. Exposure–response relationships from epidemiology studies;
  5. Dose–response relationships from toxicological studies;
  6. Applications of exposome in health risk assessments;
  7. Children’s health risk in relation to various risk factors via epidemiology studies;
  8. Methods to address uncertainties in risk assessment;
  9. Quantitative estimate of cumulative risks from chemical mixtures;
  10. Qualitative methods for assessment of exposure and health risk of environmental contaminants for children;
  11. Source apportionment and health risk identification of children’s environmental contaminants exposure.

Dr. Suzhen Cao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • exposure assessment
  • health risk assessment
  • cumulative risk
  • cancer risk
  • environmental contaminants
  • environmental disparities
  • dose–response
  • source apportionment
  • risk factors identification
  • exposure–response

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4871 KiB  
Article
TGF-β Regulates m6A RNA Methylation after PM2.5 Exposure
by Tingting Wu, Bingqian Liu, Yongjie Wei and Zhigang Li
Toxics 2023, 11(12), 1026; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11121026 - 16 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1237
Abstract
PM2.5 exposure leads to a variety of respiratory diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis, metastatic lung cancer, etc. Exposure to PM2.5 results in the alteration of epigenetic modification. M6A RNA methylation is an essential epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression at [...] Read more.
PM2.5 exposure leads to a variety of respiratory diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis, metastatic lung cancer, etc. Exposure to PM2.5 results in the alteration of epigenetic modification. M6A RNA methylation is an essential epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Our previous study found that PM2.5 exposure up-regulated m6A RNA methylation and TGF-β expression level in the lung, but the mechanisms and pathways of PM2.5 regulation of m6A RNA methylation are still unclear. Moreover, a previous study reported that the TGF-β signal pathway could regulate m6A RNA methylation. Based on this evidence, we investigate the role of the TGF-β signaling pathway in PM2.5-induced m6A RNA methylation with the A549 cell line. Our results showed that PM2.5 could induce upregulation of m6A RNA methylation, accompanied by increased expression of TGF-β, Smad3, methyltransferase-like 3 (METTL3), methyltransferase-like 14 (METTL14). Furthermore, these alterations induced by PM2.5 exposure could be reversed by treatment with TGF-β inhibitor. Therefore, we speculated that the TGF-β signal pathway plays an indispensable role in regulating m6A RNA methylation after PM2.5 exposure. Our study demonstrates that PM2.5 exposure influences m6A RNA methylation by inducing the alteration of the TGF-β signal pathway, which could be an essential mechanism for lung-related diseases induced by PM2.5 exposure. Full article
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16 pages, 328 KiB  
Article
Asthma and Other Respiratory Diseases of Children in Relation to Personal Behavior, Household, Parental and Environmental Factors in West China
by Changan Cao, Yuna Wang, Li Peng, Weiqi Wu, Huimin Yang and Zhigang Li
Toxics 2023, 11(12), 964; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11120964 - 28 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1078
Abstract
Asthma and other respiratory diseases, which are of great concern in public health, are paid less attention in areas that are less economically developed. This research aimed to study the prevalence of critical respiratory diseases of children living in West China and figure [...] Read more.
Asthma and other respiratory diseases, which are of great concern in public health, are paid less attention in areas that are less economically developed. This research aimed to study the prevalence of critical respiratory diseases of children living in West China and figure out the potential influencing factors. A total of 575 children under the age of 14 were recruited from Xinjiang, China, to participate in the study in 2022. Information on activity patterns, socioeconomic and parental factors, and household and surrounding environment situations was obtained using a questionnaire survey. Logistic regression models were applied to estimate the odds ratios of respiratory disease prevalence in relation to behavior patterns, household, parental and environmental factors, respectively. The prevalence of ever doctor-diagnosed asthma, doctor-diagnosed bronchitis and current bronchitis were 4.7%, 19.0% and 14.4%, respectively. The prevalence of doctor-diagnosed pneumonia was 8.2%, which was two times higher in urban than rural areas. Longer annual heating duration was significantly associated with higher risks in children’s asthma and bronchitis, with an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 3.363 (95% CI: 1.215–9.298) and 1.267 (95% CI: 1.002–1.601), respectively. Opening the window longer in autumn would lead to higher risks of bronchitis, with ORs of 1.165 and 1.133, respectively, for doctor-diagnosed bronchitis and current bronchitis. Residential air pollution and having a residence close to waste incineration plant or garbage station were, respectively, significantly associated with higher risks of doctor-diagnosed bronchitis and asthma. Parental disease history was associated with a higher prevalence of children’s asthma and respiratory diseases, whereas breastfeeding and doing physical exercise were, respectively, significantly associated with a lower risk of asthma. A high prevalence of respiratory diseases in children in West China may be partly attributed to longer annual heating time, opening windows longer in autumn, surrounding environmental pollution, as well as parental disease history, whereas promoting physical activity and breastfeeding could be an effective measure to reduce the risk of childhood asthma in West China. Full article
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