Environmental Contaminants in a Changing World

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Emerging Contaminants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 2149

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CESAM–Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: aquatic ecology and ecotoxicology; community ecotoxicology; evolutionary ecotoxicology; aquatic macroinvertebrates; multiple stressors (natural and anthropogenic); predation risk; parasitism; invasive species
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CESAM–Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: aquatic ecotoxicology; marine and freshwater systems; biotic and abiotic stressors; pesticides; metals; fish; aquatic invertebrates; food webs; invasive species; bioaccumulation; nutrition in aquaculture; climate changes; biochemical; physiological and behavioral biomarkers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The anthropogenic activities inherent to our modern lifestyle lead to the widespread occurrence of different types of environmental contaminants (e.g. pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, metals, plastics, industrial wastes, landfill leachates, etc.) and their single and combined toxicity have become a topical concern. Furthermore, owing to the intensification of anthropogenic activities in recent decades, new products are continuously being produced and released to the environment, with the aquatic ecosystem becoming its ultimate sink. These contaminants may cause adverse ecological effects at different levels of biological organisation, and may also pose a real threat to human health.

Furthermore, whether affected by natural or anthropogenic processes, the world is changing at an unprecedented rate, including habitat loss or fragmentation, invasive species introduction, pathogen spread, nutrient enrichment, extreme weather events, etc. Thus, considering a multiple-stressor context when evaluating contaminants’ toxicity is a high priority; however, understanding and predicting the impact of these scenarios is far from clear. In this sense, comprehending the implication of the current and future changes on the risks of contaminants to the environment and to human health is required to design effective adaptation and mitigation strategies.

This Special Issue of Toxics invites the submission of original research and reviews on the toxicity of several classes of environmental contaminants in a changing world that will enable us to discuss and increase awareness, while anticipating the likely impacts on ecosystems and living resources. The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, studies that involve biomonitoring, the implementation of new methodologies, modelling, field- and laboratory-based approaches from micro- to mesocosms and may range from sub-cellular to community and ecosystem levels in both terrestrial and aquatic environments.

Dr. Maria Donas Bôtto Bordalo
Dr. Andreia C. M. Rodrigues
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ecotoxicology
  • multiple stressor interactions
  • environmental change
  • aquatic ecosystems
  • terrestrial ecosystems
  • contaminants
  • risk assessment
  • one health approach

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

19 pages, 2272 KiB  
Article
Responses of Mytilus galloprovincialis in a Multi-Stressor Scenario: Effects of an Invasive Seaweed Exudate and Microplastic Pollution under Ocean Warming
by Cristiana Lopes, Andreia C. M. Rodrigues, Sílvia F. S. Pires, Diana Campos, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares, Hugo C. Vieira and Maria D. Bordalo
Toxics 2023, 11(11), 939; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11110939 - 18 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1789
Abstract
Microplastic pollution, global warming, and invasive species are known threats to marine biota, but the impact of their simultaneous exposure is still not well understood. This study investigated whether the toxic effects posed by the invasive red seaweed Asparagopsis armata exudate (2%) to [...] Read more.
Microplastic pollution, global warming, and invasive species are known threats to marine biota, but the impact of their simultaneous exposure is still not well understood. This study investigated whether the toxic effects posed by the invasive red seaweed Asparagopsis armata exudate (2%) to the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis are amplified by a 96 h exposure to increased temperature (24 °C) and polyethylene microplastics (PE-MPs, 1 mg/L). Biochemical (neurotoxicity, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and damage) and physiological (byssal thread production) responses were evaluated. The number of produced byssus greatly decreased under concomitant exposure to all stressors. The antioxidant defences were depleted in the gills of mussels exposed to temperature rises and PE-MPs, regardless of exudate exposure, preventing oxidative damage. Moreover, the heat shock protein content tended to decrease in all treatments relative to the control. The increased total glutathione in the mussels’ digestive gland exposed to 24 °C, exudate, and PE-MPs avoided oxidative damage. Neurotoxicity was observed in the same treatment. In contrast, the energy metabolism remained unaltered. In conclusion, depending on the endpoint, simultaneous exposure to A. armata exudate, PE-MPs, and warming does not necessarily mean an amplification of their single effects. Studies focusing on the impact of multiple stressors are imperative to better understand the underlying mechanisms of this chronic exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Contaminants in a Changing World)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop