Small Island Developing Countries (SIDS): Tourism between Innovation and Authenticity for Better Sustainable Developing Paths

A special issue of Tourism and Hospitality (ISSN 2673-5768).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2653

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Economy Department, Lisbon School of Economics and Management (ISEG), Lisbon University, 1200-781 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: tourism sustainability; economy of development; small islands developing countries (SIDS)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to various sources (World Travel and Tourism Council—WTTC, World Tourism Organization—WTO, World Bank, etc.), these countries share a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to their location and social, environmental and economic situations.

Some of these countries have long opted to develop tourism as a strategic activity, while others are just now starting this process as an optional complementary activity.

However, as we have seen with the COVID-19 pandemic and in some cases of natural hazards, several countries have temporarily inflected their growth rates revealing the fragility of the tourism market towards some external and unpredictable events.

Under all of these issues and challenges, it is important to reflect on the social, environmental and economic model of tourism in several of these regions especially those in which the economic activity is mainly centered on tourism.

Taking into consideration both the limitations and vulnerabilities of several SIDS as well as the observed changes in the tourist's profile due to the pandemic crisis, this is the right time to reflect and discuss the many innovations based on the digitalization of the offer as well as the importance of authenticity to reach new national paths of development.

Therefore, this issue will be an opportunity to propose an innovative perspective and reflection on the past, present and future of tourism in these countries. Papers that offer theoretical reflections, methodologies and case studies are most welcome.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Co-creation of value in tourism services;
  • Community-based tourism;
  • COVID-19 and post-OVID-19;
  • Cross-cultural research in tourism and leisure behaviors;
  • Design in tourism;
  • Entrepreneurship in tourism;
  • The impact of ICT developments on tourists’ decision-making and consumption processes;
  • Customers/employees’ engagement in the hospitality and leisure industry;
  • Marketing and designing the tourist experience;
  • Marketing tourism places, events, and spaces;
  • Over-tourism and resistance to tourism;
  • Robots and AI Trust in tourism;
  • Sustainable tourism;
  • Tourist decision-making and behavior;
  • Well-being in tourism.

I/We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Eduardo Moraes Sarmento
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Small Islands Development States (SIDS)
  • tourism innovation
  • co-creation of value in tourism services
  • community-based tourism
  • entrepreneurship in tourism
  • marketing and designing the tourist experience
  • over-tourism and resistance to tourism
  • robots and AI trust in tourism
  • sustainable tourism
  • well-being in tourism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1414 KiB  
Article
Building the Framework for Sustainable Tourism in Príncipe Island
by Francisco Silva and Miguel Roque
Tour. Hosp. 2024, 5(1), 225-236; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp5010015 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 878
Abstract
Like many other Small Island Developing States, São Tomé and Príncipe’s economy faces major weaknesses and constraints. These challenges are especially marked on the island of Príncipe, owing to its small size and double insularity. In recent decades, tourism, driven by international investment, [...] Read more.
Like many other Small Island Developing States, São Tomé and Príncipe’s economy faces major weaknesses and constraints. These challenges are especially marked on the island of Príncipe, owing to its small size and double insularity. In recent decades, tourism, driven by international investment, has become a strategic sector for territorial development. This study assesses the suitability of this exogenous model and explores the feasibility of adopting a progressive change to a more community-centered tourism development model. Extensive fieldwork and multi-stakeholder collaboration have highlighted the need for a holistic, multi-dimensional strategy to secure this change. Such a strategy would prioritize local skills enhancement, infrastructure improvement, better governance and the diversification of tourism products and experiences. The gradual shift to a more endogenous approach in tourism development aims to strengthen sustainability across its multiple dimensions, ensuring more substantial and direct benefits for the local community and adding value to tourist services and experiences. Full article
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15 pages, 1532 KiB  
Article
Cape Verde: Islands of Vulnerability or Resilience? A Transition from a MIRAB Model into a TOURAB One?
by Eduardo Moraes Sarmento and Ana Lorga da Silva
Tour. Hosp. 2024, 5(1), 80-94; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp5010006 - 2 Feb 2024
Viewed by 983
Abstract
Small island developing states (SIDSs) traditionally face a set of challenges like the weak and highly fragile economic configuration, environmental issues, and a traditional dependence on a few economic activities forcing them to open the economy to the exterior. Therefore, their development model, [...] Read more.
Small island developing states (SIDSs) traditionally face a set of challenges like the weak and highly fragile economic configuration, environmental issues, and a traditional dependence on a few economic activities forcing them to open the economy to the exterior. Therefore, their development model, like in Cape Verde, depends on migration, remittances, dependence on aid, tourism, and state employment. The current research offers an insight into the nature of Cape Verde’s economy as a SIDS economy and the degree to which the country has been relying on tourism receipts, external remittances from migrations, aid programs, and government services. Understanding Cape Verde’s development model is important to clarify the challenges the country faces and its development needs to gather a long-term resilience and to understand if it is changing from a MIRAB (Migrations, Remittances, Aid, and Bureaucracy) model into another one. Full article
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