Special Issue "The Quantum Simulation of Everything (and Beyond)"

A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Carlos Sabín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-b, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Interests: quantum technologies; quantum field theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ability of emulating complex behavior seems to have been a key feature in the development of human culture and society. Nowadays, simulations are ubiquituous, from arts to computer sciences. Since quantum theory describes a fundamental section of nature, it is natural to follow Feynman’s advice and use quantum technology to simulate quantum systems of interest, overcoming classical frontiers. However, on the one hand, important questions in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory, such as the description of superconductivity at high temperatures, remain open; on the other hand, the precise boundaries of quantum theory, for instance, the emergence of classicality, the compatibility with gravity, or the relevance of holographic dualities, are yet unknown. In this light, quantum simulators can be seen not only as post-classical computers but as tools to explore the frontiers of theoretical physics since they provide an experimentally amenable testbed for fundamental problems. However, what are the exact limitations of this approach? Can a quantum simulator simulate everything? Can a quantum simulator simulate what we have not yet observed? What is unobservable? What violates the laws of physics? Do simulators possess the same symmetries as nature? We propose to consider all these questions in parallel to the current technological and theoretical developments in the field of quantum simulations.

Dr. Carlos Sabín
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Symmetry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • quantum simulation
  • quantum technology
  • quantum computing
  • digital quantum simulation
  • analog quantum simulation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dynamical Triangulation Induced by Quantum Walk
Symmetry 2020, 12(1), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym12010128 - 08 Jan 2020
Abstract
We present the single-particle sector of a quantum cellular automaton, namely a quantum walk, on a simple dynamical triangulated 2-manifold. The triangulation is changed through Pachner moves, induced by the walker density itself, allowing the surface to transform into any topologically [...] Read more.
We present the single-particle sector of a quantum cellular automaton, namely a quantum walk, on a simple dynamical triangulated 2 - manifold. The triangulation is changed through Pachner moves, induced by the walker density itself, allowing the surface to transform into any topologically equivalent one. This model extends the quantum walk over triangular grid, introduced in a previous work, by one of the authors, whose space-time limit recovers the Dirac equation in (2+1)-dimensions. Numerical simulations show that the number of triangles and the local curvature grow as t α e β t 2 , where α and β parametrize the way geometry changes upon the local density of the walker, and that, in the long run, flatness emerges. Finally, we also prove that the global behavior of the walker, remains the same under spacetime random fluctuations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Quantum Simulation of Everything (and Beyond))
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Open AccessArticle
Event-Based Quantum Mechanics: A Context for the Emergence of Classical Information
Symmetry 2019, 11(2), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym11020181 - 03 Feb 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
This paper explores an event-based version of quantum mechanics which differs from the commonly accepted one, even though the usual elements of quantum formalism, e.g., the Hilbert space, are maintained. This version introduces as primary element the occurrence of micro-events induced by usual [...] Read more.
This paper explores an event-based version of quantum mechanics which differs from the commonly accepted one, even though the usual elements of quantum formalism, e.g., the Hilbert space, are maintained. This version introduces as primary element the occurrence of micro-events induced by usual physical (mechanical, electromagnetic and so on) interactions. These micro-events correspond to state reductions and are identified with quantum jumps, already introduced by Bohr in his atomic model and experimentally well established today. Macroscopic bodies are defined as clusters of jumps; the emergence of classicality thus becomes understandable and time honoured paradoxes can be solved. In particular, we discuss the cat paradox in this context. Quantum jumps are described as temporal localizations of physical quantities; if the information associated with these localizations has to be finite, two time scales spontaneously appear: an upper cosmological scale and a lower scale of elementary “particles”. This allows the interpretation of the Bekenstein limit like a particular informational constraint on the manifestation of a micro-event in the cosmos it belongs. The topic appears relevant in relation to recent discussions on possible spatiotemporal constraints on quantum computing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Quantum Simulation of Everything (and Beyond))
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