Special Issue "Tree Density Modelling and Ecosystem Services"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Silvestre Garcia de Jalon
Website
Guest Editor
Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3), Scientific Campus of the University of the Basque Country, 48940 - Leioa, Bizkaia, Spain
Interests: land use; climate change adaptation; ecosystem services; environment; natural resource management; ecological economics; environmental awareness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tree density is a fundamental factor in dictating ecosystem structure, biogeochemical processes, habitats for wildlife, forest productivity and profitability, as well as the delivery of multiple ecosystem services. Modelling approaches can play a key role in assessing the effects of tree density, since the implementation of field experiments can often be limited, due to the length of time needed to assess multiple indicators under different stages of tree growth. It is essential to develop tree density modelling approaches at different scales to identify effective forest management practices that promote the delivery of ecosystem services. This Special Issue welcomes studies that consider biophysical, social, economic, or interdisciplinary perspectives of trees in forest, agriculture, and urban land-uses, at any spatial scale (tree, plot, farm, city, regional, or global scale). In particular, this Special Issue will include papers that examine one or more of the following general themes for managing and understanding forest dynamics: eco-physiological models including forest growth and agroforestry models, forest inventories and carbon sequestration, experimental studies assessing tree effects, forest delivery of ecosystem services, adaptive forest management, conservation of forest diversity, forest optimization and other decision making frameworks, forecasting forest productivity under different tree densities, remote sensing techniques, and geographic analyses of vegetation.

Dr. Silvestre Garcia de Jalon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Modelling
  • Tree density
  • Ecosystem service
  • Optimization
  • Forest management
  • Resilience

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Quantifying Regulating Ecosystem Services with Increased Tree Densities on European Farmland
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6676; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166676 - 18 Aug 2020
Abstract
Agroforestry systems have been compared to agricultural and forestry alternatives, providing a land-use solution for additional environmental benefits while maintaining similar levels of productivity. However, there is scarce research assessing such patterns across a pan-European scale using a common methodology. This study aims [...] Read more.
Agroforestry systems have been compared to agricultural and forestry alternatives, providing a land-use solution for additional environmental benefits while maintaining similar levels of productivity. However, there is scarce research assessing such patterns across a pan-European scale using a common methodology. This study aims to improve our understanding of the role of trees in three different regulating ecosystem services—(1) soil erosion, (2) nitrate leaching and (3) carbon sequestration—in traditional and innovative agroforestry systems in Europe through a consistent modeling approach. The systems’ assessment spans environmentally from the Mediterranean environmental region in Portugal to the Continental environmental region in Switzerland and Germany to the Atlantic environmental region in the United Kingdom. Modeled tree densities were compared in the different land-use alternatives, ranging from zero (agriculture with only crops or pasture) to forestry (only trees). The methodology included the use of a biophysical model (Yield-SAFE) where the quantification of the environmental benefits was integrated. Results show a consistent improvement of regulating ecosystem services can be expected when introducing trees in the farming landscapes in different environmental regions in Europe. For all the systems, the forestry alternatives presented the best results in terms of a decrease in soil erosion of 51% (±29), a decrease of nearly all the nitrate leaching (98% ± 1) and an increase in the carbon sequestration of up to 238 Mg C ha−1 (±140). However, these alternatives are limited in the variety of food, energy and/or materials provided. On the other hand, from an arable or pure-pasture alternative starting point, an increase in agroforestry tree density could also be associated with a decrease in soil erosion of up to 25% (±17), a decrease in nitrates leached of up to 52% (±34) and an increase in the carbon sequestered of 163 Mg C ha−1 (±128) while at the same time ensuring the same levels of biomass growth and an increase in product diversification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tree Density Modelling and Ecosystem Services)
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