Special Issue "Towards Circular Economy: Evaluation of Waste Treatment"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 17 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Deborah Panepinto
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Polytechnic of Turin, 24, 10129 Torino TO, Italy
Interests: waste management; thermal treatment; wastewater treatment; renewable energy; environmental compatibility
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Marco Ravina
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Polytechnic of Turin, 24, 10129 Torino TO, Italy
Interests: waste management; air pollution dispersion; wastewater treatment; renewable energy; environmental compatibility
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the recent past, much has been made of the need for societies to reduce resource consumption. Recent estimates of human appropriation of the net primary productivity of nature range from 20% to 34%, and there is continued extraction of virgin minerals and ores due to linear material use patterns, with energy inputs predominantly supplied by nonrenewable fossil resources.
Resource conservation may be achieved through waste prevention, reuse or recovery. EU legislation on waste, including recent proposals for higher recycling targets for municipal and packaging waste and for reducing landfill, is guided by the waste hierarchy and aims to shift waste management upwards towards prevention, reuse and recycling.
In addition, in order to improve environmental quality (from the point of view of the local air quality and also from the point of view of the GHG emissions), waste prevention, reuse, and valorization must be realized.
This Special Issue aims to discuss strategy frameworks from waste treatment toward a circular economy.
The following themes would be of particular interest (note that this list is not exhaustive):

  • Waste (municipal and industrial) prevention;
  • Waste (municipal and industrial) reuse and recovery;
  • Waste (municipal and industrial) valorization;
  • Emission dispersion from waste (municipal and industrial) treatment;
  • Waste (municipal and industrial) treatment in order to reduce GHG emission.

We invite you to contribute to this issue by submitting comprehensive reviews, case studies or research articles. Papers selected for this Special Issue are subject to a rigorous peer review procedure, with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. Deborah Panepinto
Dr. Marco Ravina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waste treatment
  • circular economy
  • pollutant dispersion
  • climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Methods for Pretreatment and Quantification of Bulk Asbestos Samples for Polarized Light Microscopy Analysis to Evaluate Asbestos-Containing Waste
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6440; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226440 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study aimed to compare sample pretreatment procedures for the identification and quantification of asbestos. The performance of visual estimation and point counting procedures for evaluating asbestos-containing waste was investigated, and the effect of analytical experience was studied. The efficacy of pretreatments for [...] Read more.
This study aimed to compare sample pretreatment procedures for the identification and quantification of asbestos. The performance of visual estimation and point counting procedures for evaluating asbestos-containing waste was investigated, and the effect of analytical experience was studied. The efficacy of pretreatments for the identification and quantification of asbestos in various sample matrices was compared. To evaluate the effect of experience on analytical accuracy, three analysts with different analytical experiences were selected. There were significant differences in the quantitative analysis results obtained using different pretreatments. False negatives were reported when asbestos, especially amphiboles, were analyzed by a less-experienced analyst. Quantification via point counting and visual estimation resulted in differences in the asbestos content. The results of point counting were more accurate than those of visual estimation for all analysts, regardless of the asbestos type and concentration. Experience in asbestos analysis affected accuracy and precision. The findings show that pretreatment is an important factor in qualitative analysis. Appropriate pretreatments should be assigned based on the properties of the sample. For quantitative analysis, the accuracy of the results depends on the experience of the analyst. Until analysts are fully trained, all their analysis results should be checked by an experienced analyst. Point counting is an adequate quantitative method for analyzing samples with low concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Circular Economy: Evaluation of Waste Treatment)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Ironmaking and Steelmaking Slags as Sustainable Adsorbents for Industrial Effluents and Wastewater Treatment: A Critical Review of Properties, Performance, Challenges and Opportunities
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 2118; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12052118 - 09 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper critically discusses the structure, properties and applications of ironmaking and steelmaking slags and their silicate-based variants as low-cost adsorbents for removing cations and anions from industrial effluents and wastewater. Undoubtedly, the performance of slag-based adsorbents depends on their physical, chemical and [...] Read more.
This paper critically discusses the structure, properties and applications of ironmaking and steelmaking slags and their silicate-based variants as low-cost adsorbents for removing cations and anions from industrial effluents and wastewater. Undoubtedly, the performance of slag-based adsorbents depends on their physical, chemical and phase chemical properties. The presence of crystalline phases, for example, has a significant effect on the adsorption capacity. However, despite their low cost and ubiquity, their chemical and geometric heterogeneity significantly affects the performance and applications of slag-based adsorbents. These challenges notwithstanding, the efficacy of slag-based adsorbents can be significantly enhanced through purposeful activation to increase the specific surface area and density of adsorption sites on the surfaces of adsorbent particles. The synthesis of functionalised adsorbents such as geopolymers, zeolites and layered double hydroxides from silicate and aluminosilicate precursors can also significantly increase the performance of slag-based adsorbents. In addition, the ability to stabilise the dissolved and/or entrained toxic metal species in stable phases in slags, either through controlled post-process fluxing or crystallisation, can significantly enhance the environmental performance of slag-based adsorbents. Most critical in the design of future slag-based adsorbents is the integration of the engineered properties of molten and solidified slags to the recovery and stabilisation of dissolved and/or entrained metals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Circular Economy: Evaluation of Waste Treatment)
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