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Sustainable Approaches for Developing Concrete and Mortar

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 5769

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
ISISE, Department of Civil Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: experimental and numerical characterization of cement-based materials; sustainable approach in developing cement and concrete; fiber reinforced concrete

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Guest Editor
ISISE, Department of Civil Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: material/structural sustainability; materials engineering; fiber-reinforced polymer-reinforced structures; corrosion resistivity; material/structural durability; FRP strengthening of concrete structures; innovative structural systems
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Guest Editor
CONSTRUCT-LABEST, Faculty of Engineering (FEUP), University of Porto, 4099-002 Porto, Portugal
Interests: fiber reinforced cementitious composites; sustainable cementitious materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are calling for papers for a Special Issue of the journal Sustainability to shed light on the most sustainable approaches for developing concrete and mortar.

Concrete and mortar, which basically consist of different constituents such as binding materials, aggregate, water, and admixture materials, are some of the most widely used construction materials in the world. However, the extensive increase in the rate of industrialization and urbanization, as a result of the parallel growth in economy and population, has made conventional concrete/mortar one of the most unsustainable materials, as it consumes a high amount of natural resources and impacts the environment. For instance, the production of Portland cement, as an essential constituent of concrete/mortar, releases a significant amount of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. Another example is the extraction of natural aggregates for developing concrete/mortar, which causes soil erosion and ecosystem destruction. Thus, the introduction and application of sustainable solutions for the production of the more environmentally friendly concretes/mortars (e.g., by adopting alternative recycled waste materials that reduce the emission of greenhouse gases, collaborate in construction and demolition waste management, and conserve non-renewable resources) is of paramount importance for the building sector in order to deal with environmental issues.

This Special Issue encourages the submission of research papers that present novel methods and sustainable approaches for developing concrete and mortar. We also welcome original research that utilizes environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) methods to evaluate the effect of sustainable solutions on reducing the environmental impact of concrete/mortar production.

The papers submitted to this Special Issue will undergo a rigorous peer review procedure similar to the other issues of Sustainability, with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. Ali Edalat Behbahani
Dr. Fatemeh Soltanzadeh
Dr. Amin Abrishambaf
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable cementitious materials
  • recycled aggregate concrete/mortar
  • recycled fiber reinforced cementitious composites
  • life cycle assessment (LCA)
  • LCA inventory data
  • pozzolanic materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 6347 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Technological Properties of Mortars with the Addition of Plaster Byproduct
by Carolina Gomes Dias Ribeiro, Gustavo de Castro Xavier, Laimara da Silva Barroso, Carlos Mauricio Fontes Vieira, Sergio Neves Monteiro and Afonso Rangel Garcez de Azevedo
Sustainability 2024, 16(3), 1193; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16031193 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 451
Abstract
The incorporation of waste into construction materials is a potential topic for study and is seen as a solution for many industries that face the following impasse: the risk to the environment due to the accumulation of waste in yards. In view of [...] Read more.
The incorporation of waste into construction materials is a potential topic for study and is seen as a solution for many industries that face the following impasse: the risk to the environment due to the accumulation of waste in yards. In view of this, during the production of lactic acid, which is widely used in industries, gypsum is produced as a byproduct, yielding one ton for each ton of lactic acid. Aiming at a functional destination for this byproduct, this study proposes its addition in mortars for covering walls and ceilings. The research proposal was a mortar in a 1:6 ratio (cement:sand) with the addition of 0, 3, 6 and 10% of industrial plaster byproduct. The cement used to prepare the mortar was CPII-E32. To characterize the raw materials, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analysis were carried out. To evaluate the properties in the fresh state, a consistency index and mass density and entrained air tests were carried out. In the hardened state, mass density, axial compression strength, flexural tensile strength and water absorption via capillarity were evaluated after 28 days of age. Microstructural characterization techniques were also carried out on the reference mixtures and with 3% addition of the byproduct gypsum, such as scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the byproduct is hemihydrate and its addition improved the workability of the mortar. Mortars with the addition of byproduct gypsum showed a reduction in mechanical resistance. The most satisfactory results were for the mixes with a 3% addition, indicating greater resistance to axial compression and flexural traction, with 3.90 MPa and 1.14 MPa, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Approaches for Developing Concrete and Mortar)
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23 pages, 4587 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Sustainability of Fibre-Reinforced Concrete by Considering Both Environmental and Mechanical Properties
by Fatemeh Soltanzadeh, Ali E. Behbahani, Kasra Hosseinmostofi and Carlos A. Teixeira
Sustainability 2022, 14(10), 6347; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14106347 - 23 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2243
Abstract
The environmental consequences of human activities, e.g., the depletion of non-renewable fuel resources, consumption of natural raw materials, and release of huge amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere, resulted in new challenges in materials engineering. Based on these challenges, building materials must [...] Read more.
The environmental consequences of human activities, e.g., the depletion of non-renewable fuel resources, consumption of natural raw materials, and release of huge amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere, resulted in new challenges in materials engineering. Based on these challenges, building materials must fulfil not only mechanical performance criteria, but also produce the least environmental impact accompanied by their production. In the present study, the possibility of employing scrap tire recycled steel fibres (RSF) as a substitution to industrial steel fibres (ISF) for developing more sustainable fibre-reinforced concretes was explored by adopting a life-cycle approach, integrated both environmental and mechanical properties. Four different fibre-reinforced self-compacting concretes–FRSCCs–were tailored by means of replacing the ISFs partially/totally (i.e., 0%, 50%, 67%, 100% by mass of) with the recycled ones. The effect of applying various dosages of RSFs on mechanical behavior of FRSCC–namely compressive, flexural, and splitting tensile responses–were evaluated experimentally. The environmental impacts associated with the production of each FRSCC were also assessed through life-cycle analysis. The potentiality of the RSFs to be used as concrete reinforcement with a comparable mechanical performance to that of ISF-reinforced concrete and lower environmental footprint was evaluated through a consolidated environmental and mechanical index (EM). In this study, using RSFs instead of industrial fibres for developing FRSCC has provided up to 37% higher EM index. The results confirmed the promising prospects for the application of RSFs in developing more eco-efficient and sustainable reinforced concrete. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Approaches for Developing Concrete and Mortar)
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24 pages, 2805 KiB  
Article
A Life-Cycle Approach to Integrate Environmental and Mechanical Properties of Blended Cements Containing Seashell Powder
by Fatemeh Soltanzadeh, Ali E. Behbahani, Eduardo N. B. Pereira and Carlos A. Teixeira
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13120; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313120 - 26 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1831
Abstract
The adverse consequences of producing ordinary Portland cement (OPC) on the environment have introduced cement production as the fourth largest source of anthropogenic carbon emissions after petroleum, coal, and natural gas. Managing and reducing the environmental concerns regarding the impacts of cement production [...] Read more.
The adverse consequences of producing ordinary Portland cement (OPC) on the environment have introduced cement production as the fourth largest source of anthropogenic carbon emissions after petroleum, coal, and natural gas. Managing and reducing the environmental concerns regarding the impacts of cement production on the environment, namely the depletion of non-renewable fuel resources, consumption of natural raw materials, and releasing huge amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere should be, therefore, one of the key priorities of the cement industry. Application of locally available minerals and wastes that can be blended with OPC as a substitute could considerably reduce the environmental impact. The present study evaluates the potentiality of waste seashell to be used as an additive in the production of blended cement through a modified life cycle approach integrating environmental and mechanical performances. In this regard, 34 cements consisting of different blends of OPC, seashell powder (within the range of 4–30% by OPC mass), and natural pozzolan (up to 30% by OPC mass) were tested to identify the optimal dosage of OPC substitution. Environmental impacts of the cements were assessed through life-cycle analysis. The possibility of mitigating the carbon dioxide emissions in the production of cements, with similar mechanical performance compared to that of OPC, was evaluated by considering both the mechanical and environmental results. The outcome of this study introduced more environment-friendly and sustainable options for future cements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Approaches for Developing Concrete and Mortar)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Assessment the sustainability of fibre reinforced concrete by considering both environmental and mechanical properties
Authors: Fatemeh Soltanzadeh1, Ali E. Behbahani1, Carlos A. Teixeira2, Kasra Hossein Mostofi1
Affiliation: 1ISISE, Dep. of Civil Engineering, School of Engineering, Univ. of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal 2Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Portugal
Abstract: Application of recycled products in the construction industry, as a solution for tackling negative environmental impacts of continuous material extraction and waste generation, is hamstrung due to perceptions of lower quality, and uncertain performance benefits. In the present study, the possibility of employing tire recycled steel fibers (RSF) as a substitution to industrial steel fibers (ISF) for developing more sustainable fiber reinforced concretes was explored by adopting a life-cycle approach, integrated environmental and mechanical properties. Four different fiber reinforced self-compacting concretes, FRSCCs, were tailored by means of replacing partially/totally (i.e. 0%, 50%, 67%, 100% mass of) the ISFs with the recycled ones. The effect of applying various dosages of RSFs on mechanical behavior of FRSCC, namely: compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths, were compared experimentally with the performance of the concrete solely reinforced with the ISFs. The environmental impacts associated with the production of each FRSCC were also assessed through life-cycle analysis. The potentiality of the RSFs to be used as concrete reinforcement with a comparable mechanical performance to that of ISF reinforced concrete and with a lower environmental footprint was evaluated by considering the results of both environmental and mechanical assessments. This study confirms the promising prospects for the application of scrap tire fibers in developing more eco-efficient and sustainable reinforced concrete.

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