sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Sustainable Integrated Planning of Positive Energy Districts"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2021) | Viewed by 4942

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carmel Margaret Lindkvist
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture and Planning, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Interests: Knowledge transfer; knowledge integration; intermediaries; Facilities Management; teaming approaches; communities of practices; cross disciplinary collaboration
Prof. Dr. Annemie Wyckmans
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture and Planning, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Interests: Co-creation; open innovation 2.0 methods to achieve people-centric smart sustainable cities
Dr. Savis Gohari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Postdoc, Department of Architecture and Planning, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim, Norway
Interests: sustainable urban ecosystems; infrastructure governance; smart energy communities; knowledge-based urban development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Daniela Baer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, Materials and Structures, SINTEF Community, Trondheim, Norway
Interests: Participatory processes; smart and sustainable communities; energy planning; Zero emission neighborhoods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable Integrated Planning for Positive Energy Districts requires earlier involvement of stakeholders, different approaches to planning processes, and open innovation. Currently, the participation of actors within the early planning phases is unclear, and sometimes ideas developed early are lost during the long timelines of planning processes [1,2]. Europe has made significant progress in building level innovations and is now stepping up efforts with the concept of Positive Energy Districts (PED). The technical definition of PED is an urban neighborhood with annual net zero energy import and net zero CO₂ emissions working towards a surplus production of renewable energy, integrated in an urban and regional energy system [3]; however, developing PED involves engagement with local communities, governance structures, and industries. Collaboration and participation processes are challenged by the requirement for knowledge integration of diverse practice perspectives of what is the priority in a city [1,4]. Short-sighted hierarchal agendas prohibit the incorporation of renewables in urban planning, and in addition, not all stakeholders view sustainability with equal importance [5,6]. The “Quadruple Helix” features government, academia, industry, and civil society as key actors promoting a democratic approach with socially accountable decision-making alongside the exploitation of disruptive technologies leading to open innovation 2.0 [7]. Time is also influential on what decisions are carried forward from early planning processes to implementation [4], as intermediaries for knowledge continuation are obscured amongst accessible stakeholders who are present in the different phases of decision-making [1,2]. The Special Issue aims to contribute to sustainable planning by examining open innovation, roles of key actors, knowledge continuation, processes and phases of planning to implementation that enables the potential for Positive Energy Districts. Within this Special Issue we focus on 3 key interlinked themes:

Collaborative governance for open innovation:

  • Identification of public-private partnerships which enable value creation in complex urban environments
  • Actor understanding and meaning of coordination and cooperation in “collaborative governance” structures that move towards Positive Energy Districts
  • Influencing factors that lead to collaborative governance

Temporal impact of knowledge continuation from early planning processes to implementation

  • Impact of diverse (and often new) actors/practices understanding of ideas for PEDs from planning to implementation
  • Key stakeholders who ensure knowledge continuation from one phase to the next and the impact of forgotten knowledge
  • Types of participation processes and methodologies enabling future users of districts to participate in integrated (energy) planning for PEDs

Participatory processes for engaging diverse stakeholder interests

  • Scope for facilitation of a permanent participation processes in urban development on district level
  • Motivation and incentives of participation processes – for organizations, society, and individual stakeholders

References:

  1. Lindkvist, C.; Juhasz-Nagy, E.; Nielsen, B.F.; Neumann, H.-M.; Lobaccaro, G.; Wyckmans, A. Intermediaries for knowledge transfer in integrated energy planning of urban districts. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 2019, 142, 354–363.
  2. Gohari, S.; Baer, D.; Nielsen, B. F.; Gilcher, E.; Situmorang, W. Z. Prevailing Approaches and Practices of Citizen Participation in Smart City Projects: Lessons from Trondheim, Norway. Infrastructures 2020, 5, 36.
  3. Available online: https://jpi-urbaneurope.eu/ped/ (accessed on 7 July 2020).
  4. Nielsen, B. F.; Baer, D.; Lindkvist, C. M. Identifying and supporting exploratory and exploitative models of innovation in municipal urban planning; key challenges from seven Norwegian energy ambitious neighborhood pilots. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 2019, 142, 142–153.
  5. Dixon, T.; Eames, M.; Britnell, J.; Watson, G.B.; Hunt, M. Urban retrofitting: identifying disruptive and sustain technologies using performative and foresight techniques. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 2014, 89, 131–144.
  6. Mirakyan, A.; De Guio, R. Modelling and uncertainties in integrated energy planning. Renew. Sust. Energ. Rev. 2015, 46, 62–69.
  7. Curley, M. and Salmelin, B. Open Innovation 2.0: The New Mode of Digital Innovation for Prosperity and Sustainability; Springer: Berlin, Germany, 2018.

Dr. Carmel Margaret Lindkvist
Prof. Dr. Annemie Wyckmans
Dr. Savis Gohari Krangsås
Dr. Daniela Baer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Open Innovation
  • Knowledge Transfer
  • Participatory approaches
  • Governance
  • Integrated Planning
  • Positive Energy Districts

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Positive Energy Districts: Identifying Challenges and Interdependencies
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10551; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910551 - 23 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1440
Abstract
Positive Energy Districts (PED) are areas within cities that generate more renewable energy than they consume, contributing to cities’ energy system transformation toward carbon neutrality. Since PED is a novel concept, the implementation is very challenging. Within the European Cooperation in Science and [...] Read more.
Positive Energy Districts (PED) are areas within cities that generate more renewable energy than they consume, contributing to cities’ energy system transformation toward carbon neutrality. Since PED is a novel concept, the implementation is very challenging. Within the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action, which offers an open space for collaboration among scientists across Europe (and beyond), this paper asks what the needs for supporting the implementation of PEDs are. To answer this, it draws on Delphi process (expert reviews) as the main method alongside the literature review and also uses surveys as supplementary methods to identify the main challenges for developing PEDs. Initial findings reveal seven interacting topics that later were ranked as highest to the lowest as the following: governance, incentive, social, process, market, technology and context. These are interrelated and interdependent, implying that none can be considered in isolation of the others and cannot be left out in order to ensure the successful development of PEDs. The resources that are needed to address these challenges are a common need for systematic understanding of the processes behind them, as well as cross-disciplinary models and protocols to manage the complexity of developing PEDs. The results can be the basis for devising the conceptual framework on the development of new PED guides and tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Integrated Planning of Positive Energy Districts)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Approaches to Social Innovation in Positive Energy Districts (PEDs)—A Comparison of Norwegian Projects
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7362; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137362 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1996
Abstract
The Positive Energy District (PED) concept is a localized city and district level response to the challenges of greenhouse gas emission reduction and energy transition. With the Strategic Energy Transition (SET) Plan aiming to establish 100 PEDs by 2025 in Europe, a number [...] Read more.
The Positive Energy District (PED) concept is a localized city and district level response to the challenges of greenhouse gas emission reduction and energy transition. With the Strategic Energy Transition (SET) Plan aiming to establish 100 PEDs by 2025 in Europe, a number of PED projects are emerging in the EU member states. While the energy transition is mainly focusing on technical innovations, social innovation is crucial to guarantee the uptake and deployment of PEDs in the built environment. We set the spotlight on Norway, which, to date, has three PED projects encompassing 12 PED demo sites in planning and early implementation stages, from which we extract approaches for social innovations and discuss how these learnings can contribute to further PED planning and implementation. We describe the respective approaches and learnings for social innovation of the three PED projects, ZEN, +CityxChange and syn.ikia, in a multiple case study approach. Through the comparison of these projects, we start to identify social innovation approaches with different scopes regarding citizen involvement, stakeholder interaction and capacity building. These insights are also expected to contribute to further planning and design of PED projects within local and regional networks (PEDs in Nordic countries) and contribute to international PED concept development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Integrated Planning of Positive Energy Districts)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Unboxing Buildings: Engaging with Occupants during Design, Testing and Use
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3201; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063201 - 15 Mar 2021
Viewed by 688
Abstract
Current prioritization within EU funding sees technical requirements for sustainable buildings moving technologies closer to people’s everyday lives, thereby increasing the need for interdisciplinary research, and placing occupant engagement high on the research agenda. This is not always reflected in building research. Results [...] Read more.
Current prioritization within EU funding sees technical requirements for sustainable buildings moving technologies closer to people’s everyday lives, thereby increasing the need for interdisciplinary research, and placing occupant engagement high on the research agenda. This is not always reflected in building research. Results are often black boxed, and occupants are offered few opportunities for participation in design and development processes. The paper considers the unintended consequences of black boxing buildings. A black box is a complex system or object which is viewed in terms of its inputs and outputs, but where knowledge of the internal workings is not required. Using an experienced-based analysis from a social science perspective, we go back and consider the controversies around black boxing the processes and results in three Norwegian building research projects. In the conclusion, we propose that some research projects should remain unboxed, making complexity visible and allowing more focus on the challenges faced by occupants. Not taking time to ask and to learn from those who will use new technical solutions hinders the design process and limits a building’s chances of achieving its sustainable potential. Designing successful building solutions requires collaboration between disciplines and occupants, encouraging an alliance between people, technology, and buildings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Integrated Planning of Positive Energy Districts)
Back to TopTop