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Article

Approaches to Social Innovation in Positive Energy Districts (PEDs)—A Comparison of Norwegian Projects

1
SINTEF Community, NO-7034 Trondheim, Norway
2
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies of Culture, NTNU—Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
3
Department of Architecture and Planning, NTNU—Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
4
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, NTNU—Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kristian Fabbri
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7362; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137362
Received: 19 May 2021 / Revised: 11 June 2021 / Accepted: 23 June 2021 / Published: 30 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Integrated Planning of Positive Energy Districts)
The Positive Energy District (PED) concept is a localized city and district level response to the challenges of greenhouse gas emission reduction and energy transition. With the Strategic Energy Transition (SET) Plan aiming to establish 100 PEDs by 2025 in Europe, a number of PED projects are emerging in the EU member states. While the energy transition is mainly focusing on technical innovations, social innovation is crucial to guarantee the uptake and deployment of PEDs in the built environment. We set the spotlight on Norway, which, to date, has three PED projects encompassing 12 PED demo sites in planning and early implementation stages, from which we extract approaches for social innovations and discuss how these learnings can contribute to further PED planning and implementation. We describe the respective approaches and learnings for social innovation of the three PED projects, ZEN, +CityxChange and syn.ikia, in a multiple case study approach. Through the comparison of these projects, we start to identify social innovation approaches with different scopes regarding citizen involvement, stakeholder interaction and capacity building. These insights are also expected to contribute to further planning and design of PED projects within local and regional networks (PEDs in Nordic countries) and contribute to international PED concept development. View Full-Text
Keywords: social innovation; positive energy districts; PED; energy transition; smart cities; zero emission neighborhoods; sustainable positive energy neighborhoods; positive energy blocks; Norway social innovation; positive energy districts; PED; energy transition; smart cities; zero emission neighborhoods; sustainable positive energy neighborhoods; positive energy blocks; Norway
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baer, D.; Loewen, B.; Cheng, C.; Thomsen, J.; Wyckmans, A.; Temeljotov-Salaj, A.; Ahlers, D. Approaches to Social Innovation in Positive Energy Districts (PEDs)—A Comparison of Norwegian Projects. Sustainability 2021, 13, 7362. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137362

AMA Style

Baer D, Loewen B, Cheng C, Thomsen J, Wyckmans A, Temeljotov-Salaj A, Ahlers D. Approaches to Social Innovation in Positive Energy Districts (PEDs)—A Comparison of Norwegian Projects. Sustainability. 2021; 13(13):7362. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137362

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baer, Daniela, Bradley Loewen, Caroline Cheng, Judith Thomsen, Annemie Wyckmans, Alenka Temeljotov-Salaj, and Dirk Ahlers. 2021. "Approaches to Social Innovation in Positive Energy Districts (PEDs)—A Comparison of Norwegian Projects" Sustainability 13, no. 13: 7362. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137362

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