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Sustainable Innovation Trends and Global Value Chains in Emerging Markets

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021) | Viewed by 27431

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Business and Public Administration, University of the District of Columbia (UDC), Washington, DC 20008, USA
Interests: digital/DSMM marketing; human–robot interaction; socio-ethical collaborative robotics; marketing analytics; social media strategy mix and social media measurement; stereotypical advertising polysemy; consumer behavior; ambient advertising; innovative experiential learning models in marketing and logistics/supply chain management; relational supply chain strategy relationships; project management

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Guest Editor
Scheller College of Business, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30308-0520, USA
Interests: International business strategy; export–import management; comparative management; international technology transfer; international political economy; issues relating to the globalization of the management; curriculum
Associate Professor of Supply Chain Management, School of Business and Public Administration, University of the District of Columbia (UDC), Washington, DC, USA
Interests: logistics; supply chain management

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Guest Editor
School of Business and Public Administration, University of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC, USA
Interests: Public Administration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In December 2019, infections with the new coronavirus (COVID-19) started in the Chinese province of Hubei, and soon spread all over the world. As of 2 June 2020, there have been over 6 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 (along with 380,000 deaths) worldwide. In the US alone, there are over 1.8 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 with more than 106,000 deaths (according to the COVID-19 dashboard by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University). The COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak has majorly disrupted and is continuing to disrupt manufacturing and global value chains, with consequences for businesses, consumers, and the global economy. Companies today are scrambling to respond to these disruptions caused by COVID-19 in both developed and emerging markets. The impact on global economies through this crisis is yet unknown, but it is believed to be more damaging than anything we have experienced in the past. From a value-chain perspective, the disruptions associated with past crises (e.g., the 2003 outbreak of SARS or the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster) may not provide enough information or lessons learned for the present times. This COVID-19 crisis could cost the global economy $1.1 trillion in lost income and, at the same time, may result in innovations across the world, especially emerging markets, with a focus on sustainability and global value chains.

Global supply chains are continually evolving and transforming the way emerging world economies do business with their developed counterparts. Developing nations are joining forces with developed nations through these rapidly transforming global value chains (GVCs) without investing in building their own, thus saving time, money, and gaining access to technological innovations. Today, developing countries exert greater influence globally, economically, and politically, given the power of GVCs. Through international organizations, such as the World Bank, the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Labor Organization (ILO), and the US Agency for International Development (USAID), GVCs lead the way for shaping international trade, governance, production, employment, growth, development, and competitiveness. The global economy is at a major inflection point due to the current COVID-19 situation and worldwide supply chain disruptions, and ‘resilience’ is needed for global organizations and emerging markets to survive through structural redesign and performance re-planning with a view on long-term impacts.

In this Special Issue of Sustainability, we invite submissions focused on sustainable innovation trends and global supply chains as value chains in emerging (versus developed) economies, international trade, and interrelationships amongst logistics, supply chain management, and global trade. We welcome submissions that offer important conceptual and empirical insights into the nature and processes of sustainable development, sustainable innovation, GVCs, GVC approaches and frameworks in different world economies, and global supply (value) chains. Of interest are papers that examine the impact of cross-cultural issues, characteristics, and challenges with regard to sustainable innovation trends and GVCs with regard to emerging world economies.

Dr. Anshu Arora
Dr. John R. McIntyre
Dr. Amit Arora
Dr. Julius Ndumbe Anyu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable innovation trends in emerging vs. developed markets
  • Global supply (value) chains in emerging vs. developed markets
  • Factors impacting the geographic clustering of internationalization efforts for GVCs worldwide (developed as well as emerging economies)
  • The impact of technology, innovation, institutions, industrialization, internationalization, and governance on GVCs with regard to developing and developed economies
  • The effect of internationalization on GVCs within a company, country or geographic region
  • Cross-cultural collaboration and managerial mindset needed in GVC efforts
  • Theoretical and empirical contributions to the field of sustainability, sustainable innovation, GVCs, and emerging markets

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 4619 KiB  
Article
A Study of Lacquerware Industry’s Upgrading and Sustainability Strategies from the Perspective of GVCs—Using China Fuzhou Lacquerware Industry as Example
by Jianping Huang, Chinlon Lin, Yang Gao and Chun-liang Chen
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 4937; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13094937 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3071
Abstract
To discover how the lacquerware industry realizes its core competency, it is important to explore its upgrading strategies in the global value chains. The purpose of this study is to discuss the upgrading strategies applied during the lacquerware industry’s four economic stages and [...] Read more.
To discover how the lacquerware industry realizes its core competency, it is important to explore its upgrading strategies in the global value chains. The purpose of this study is to discuss the upgrading strategies applied during the lacquerware industry’s four economic stages and the approach to realize the industry’s sustainability. Results show that (1) OEM enterprises reach process upgrading with four strategies, ODM enterprises reach product upgrading with five strategies, OBM enterprises reach functional upgrading with four strategies, and OSM enterprises reach chain upgrading with two strategies; (2) the lacquerware industry‘s main elements in SSCM include the long-standing relations, reprocessing of defective products, employing the local community, and participation in regional and transregional development initiatives, wherein the design sector is the main link in the SSCM of the lacquerware. The result and implications provided by this study can serve as a reference for other lacquerware and local traditional handicraft industries that are seeking to upgrade and achieve sustainability during their economic development. Full article
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19 pages, 1752 KiB  
Article
Driving Innovation through Energy Efficiency: A Russian Regional Analysis
by Alexander Melnik, Irina Naoumova, Kirill Ermolaev and Jerome Katrichis
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 4810; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13094810 - 25 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1689
Abstract
Recent literature on energy efficiency focuses on the issues of energy security and options for reducing energy consumption. Measuring energy efficiency properly and forecasting future needs is critical to the energy policies of any country, especially given the importance of sustainability in their [...] Read more.
Recent literature on energy efficiency focuses on the issues of energy security and options for reducing energy consumption. Measuring energy efficiency properly and forecasting future needs is critical to the energy policies of any country, especially given the importance of sustainability in their economic development. The role innovation plays in improving energy efficiency is well researched. There is a gap in examining an opposite relationship. That is, where energy efficiency becomes a critical factor for fueling innovation. This impact can occur within a company, a region, a nation or on an international level. Here we show that regions could motivate business innovations through policies requiring energy efficiency. Based on observations from a number of regions of an emerging economy, we show that energy efficiency impacts innovation. As a side effect it can contribute to export increases, which in turn can improve regional attractiveness for investors. We believe that the spiral development of the relationship between energy efficiency and innovation used as a strategy could become sustainable. Full article
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17 pages, 499 KiB  
Article
The Empirical Analysis of Green Innovation for Fashion Brands, Perceived Value and Green Purchase Intention—Mediating and Moderating Effects
by Lihong Chen, Kexin Qie, Hafeezullah Memon and Hanur Meku Yesuf
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4238; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084238 - 11 Apr 2021
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 9265
Abstract
Aiming at the problems of pollution and waste in the clothing industry, the concept of the green innovation of clothing brands is put forward here and analyzed in terms of five dimensions: green product innovation, green technology innovation, green image innovation, green service [...] Read more.
Aiming at the problems of pollution and waste in the clothing industry, the concept of the green innovation of clothing brands is put forward here and analyzed in terms of five dimensions: green product innovation, green technology innovation, green image innovation, green service innovation, and marketing green innovation. Based on the theory of perceived value, in this study we analyzed the mechanism of clothing brand green innovation with regard to consumers’ purchase intention and, on this basis, investigated the mediating role of perceived value and the moderating role of consumer innovation. Simultaneously, we designed a measurement scale for clothing brand green innovation and used the structural equation model to test the research hypothesis. The results showed that clothing brand green innovation can effectively promote green purchase intention and behavior, that consumers produce purchase intention and behavior through the perception of novelty, usefulness, and greenness, and that highly innovative consumers are more likely to perceive novelty and are more willing to buy. This study provides new ideas and references for clothing brand green innovation. Full article
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18 pages, 647 KiB  
Article
Global Value Chains’ Disaggregation through Supply Chain Collaboration, Market Turbulence, and Performance Outcomes
by Amit Arora, Anshu Arora, Julius Anyu and John R. McIntyre
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4151; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084151 - 8 Apr 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4933
Abstract
This research examines supply chain collaboration effects on organizational performance in global value chain (GVC) infrastructure by focusing on GVC disaggregation, market turbulence, inequality, market globalization, product diversity, exploitation, and technological breakthroughs. The research strives to develop a better understanding of global value [...] Read more.
This research examines supply chain collaboration effects on organizational performance in global value chain (GVC) infrastructure by focusing on GVC disaggregation, market turbulence, inequality, market globalization, product diversity, exploitation, and technological breakthroughs. The research strives to develop a better understanding of global value chains through relational view, behavioral, and contingency theories along with institutional and stakeholder theories of supply chains. Based on conflicting insights from these theories, this research investigates how relationships and operational outcomes of collaboration fare when market turbulence is present. Data is obtained and analyzed from focal firms that are engaged in doing business in emerging markets (e.g., India), and headquartered in the United States. We investigate relational outcomes (e.g., trust, credibility, mutual respect, and relationship commitment) among supply chain partners, and found that these relational outcomes result in better operational outcomes (e.g., profitability, market share increase, revenue generation, etc.). From managerial standpoint, supply chain managers should focus on relational outcomes that can strengthen operational outcomes in GVCs resulting in stronger organizational performance. The research offers valuable insights for theory and practice of global value chains by focusing on the GVC disaggregation through the measurement of market turbulence, playing a key role in the success of collaborative buyer–supplier relationships (with a focus on US companies doing business in India) leading to an overall improved firm performance. Full article
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26 pages, 771 KiB  
Article
Green Innovation Risk Identification of the Manufacturing Industry under Global Value Chain Based on Grounded Theory
by Yingying Sun, Lei Wu and Shi Yin
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10270; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410270 - 9 Dec 2020
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3383
Abstract
Green innovation in the manufacturing industry has been widely recognized. Although green innovation can create economic, social, and ecological value, it is also a high-risk activity. We must facilitate and protect the value of green innovation through scientific and systematic management of the [...] Read more.
Green innovation in the manufacturing industry has been widely recognized. Although green innovation can create economic, social, and ecological value, it is also a high-risk activity. We must facilitate and protect the value of green innovation through scientific and systematic management of the risks generated in the process of innovation. The primary task of risk management is risk identification. Therefore, based on the perspective of the global value chain, this paper identifies the risk of green innovation in the manufacturing industry using the research method of grounded theory. By examining the interview records of 25 manufacturing enterprise executives, we summarize and identify the four major risks and 31 risk factors of green innovation. The empirical results of this paper are as follows: (1) the green innovation risks of the manufacturing industry under the global value chain include green R&D risks under the global value chain; manufacturing risks under the global value chain; marketing risks under the global value chain; service risks under the global value chain. (2) Green R&D risks under the global value chain include seven risk factors; green manufacturing risks under the global value chain include 10 risk factors; green marketing risks under the global value chain include nine risk factors; green service risks under the global value chain include five risk factors. Full article
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Review

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18 pages, 1401 KiB  
Review
Green Practices for Global Supply Chains in Diverse Industrial, Geographical, and Technological Settings: A Literature Review and Research Agenda
by Maria Giuffrida and Riccardo Mangiaracina
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10151; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310151 - 4 Dec 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3643
Abstract
With the rise in global consumption and the consequent intensive demand for global resources, the attention of scholars and practitioners towards greener supply chains has grown over the years. In this context, this study has two main aims. The first is to offer [...] Read more.
With the rise in global consumption and the consequent intensive demand for global resources, the attention of scholars and practitioners towards greener supply chains has grown over the years. In this context, this study has two main aims. The first is to offer an up-to-date literature review of the ways in which sustainability is pursued in diverse settings, based on the sector, the geographical area, and the level of adoption of digital technologies of a company. The second aim is to identify the research gaps in this field, and to suggest directions for future investigations. The results of the structured literature review reveal that, although developed and developing countries tend to focus on different types of sustainable interventions, three factors are consistently considered to be crucial for the success of a sustainable initiative in global supply chains. These factors are the collaboration along the supply chain, the commitment of the top management, and the presence of environmentally-oriented policies or regulations. These three factors complicate the decision-making process that is needed to implement sustainable practices. Therefore, we suggest ways in which to design future research that better capture the real challenges of making environmentally conscious decisions, leveraging on the concepts of the Intertwined Supply Network (ISN) and the cognitive frame. Full article
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