Special Issue "The Continuing Value of Civil Engineering Heritage"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Martin Crapper
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Heritage and Future Research Group, Department of Mechanical and Construction Engineering, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE7 7YJ, UK
Dr. Davide Motta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Heritage and Future Research Group, Department of Mechanical and Construction Engineering, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE7 7YJ, UK

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

From the Great Wall of China and the monumental aqueducts of the Roman Empire, to the still heavily-used nineteenth century railway networks that cross Europe and the Americas, and the water and sewer systems that continue to supply and drain cities across the world, Civil Engineering has provided the infrastructure upon which human civilization is built and sustained. Many projects have endured in use far beyond what a modern designer would envisage: the Aqua Virgo aqueduct in Rome still carries water over 2000 years after its first commissioning; trains still run on the alignment of the 1830 Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The social, environmental and economic value extracted from these and other projects goes far beyond anything that the original promoters could have foreseen, whilst the physical infrastructure is loaded in ways vastly different from those the designers could have considered. Projects have also stood through decades or centuries of social, political and environmental change, sometimes finding new uses in addition to or instead of their original ones. Yet, in the contemporary world, infrastructure development is often controversial, with projects ranging from the Mekong Delta hydropower expansion to the UK’s HS2 high-speed rail line being associated with ill-informed debate, and proving slow and costly in the planning stage, often due to extended discussion on projected cost-benefits.

How can we examine the continuing value of great Civil Engineering achievements from the earliest times to the more recent past? How can we use our conclusions to inform the debate on modern Civil Engineering infrastructure development, and to help create heritage for the future? What can we learn in terms of design, operation, and maintenance of past Civil Engineering infrastructure in relation to its durability and sustainability in a changing world?

In order to help address these over-arching questions, we invite contributions addressing any aspect of the continuing value of Civil Engineering heritage: defining and quantifying what it means, how it comes to be regarded as heritage, and in particular which lessons it can teach us for the benefit of our descendants, both future Civil Engineers and citizens who will use the Civil Engineering infrastructure of the future.

Themes

  1. The changing understanding of the cultural and historical value of Civil Engineering heritage from ancient to recent times
  2. Exploring how utilitarian infrastructure becomes Civil Engineering heritage
  3. Quantitative and qualitative valuation of Civil Engineering infrastructure used well beyond its expected design life
  4. Lessons to be learned from enduring Civil Engineering heritage: sustainable procurement, long design life, good maintenance, resilience to changes in climate, demand and many other things
  5. Effective cost-benefit models for hugely long-lived Civil Engineering infrastructure: using lessons from the past to better inform future planning and design
  6. Designing for the future: using the history of changes of use to design more flexible Civil Engineering infrastructure for potential future needs
  7. Selling the Civil Engineering heritage of the future: how can heritage values help us understand and communicate the benefits of new infrastructure development?
  8. Successful conservation and interpretation of disused or changed-use Civil Engineering projects
  9. Using modern techniques to better understand past Civil Engineering projects
  10. Keeping up to date with the old way of doing things: Civil Engineering skills and knowledge for maintaining heritage systems still in use
  11. Use of vernacular and traditional construction in modern Civil Engineering
  12. Ancient Civil Engineering projects as a resource for studying past physical, political and social environments.

Prof. Dr. Martin Crapper
Dr. Davide Motta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploring Critical Variables That Affect the Policy Risk Level of Industrial Heritage Projects in China
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6848; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236848 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
With the rapid development of the transformation and urbanization of Chinese social structures, more and more industrial heritage renewal projects are emerging. However, there are significant policy risks associated with Chinese industrial heritage renewal projects. Through a literature review, a total of 20 [...] Read more.
With the rapid development of the transformation and urbanization of Chinese social structures, more and more industrial heritage renewal projects are emerging. However, there are significant policy risks associated with Chinese industrial heritage renewal projects. Through a literature review, a total of 20 policy risk factors were determined, and a total of 10 industrial heritage renewal project managers in six regions nationwide conducted a pilot study. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect 398 evaluations of these 20 risk factors from relevant professionals. Secondly, through confirmatory factor analysis, a six-part policy risk assessment model was established. The results indicated that the critical variables that affect the policy risk level were: (1) industry maturity, (2) tax policy, (3) financial freedom, (4) the rule of law, (5) local market size, and (6) local market experience. Moreover, there are significant opportunities and policy risks in Chinese industrial heritage renewal projects, and appropriate strategies can capture these opportunities and mitigate risks. As there are few pieces of research on the policy risks of industrial heritage renewal projects in China, this study has a certain reference significance for the policy risk management of industrial heritage renewal projects in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Continuing Value of Civil Engineering Heritage)
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Open AccessArticle
Interpretation of Value Advantage and Sustainable Tourism Development for Railway Heritage in China Based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6492; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226492 - 18 Nov 2019
Abstract
Railway heritage (RH) conservation protects significant industrial culture and can be instrumental in revitalizing post-industrial economies. China has abundant RH resources needing conservation to ensure their long-term survival. The purpose of this study was to define the value of RH based on an [...] Read more.
Railway heritage (RH) conservation protects significant industrial culture and can be instrumental in revitalizing post-industrial economies. China has abundant RH resources needing conservation to ensure their long-term survival. The purpose of this study was to define the value of RH based on an improved value evaluation system, discuss how the results influence RH tourism, and provide proposals for sustainable tourism accordingly. Firstly, the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to evaluate the value of six RH sites from China’s First Industrial Heritage List. Then, the value advantages of the RH sites were analyzed by making comparisons among the six in the view of sustainable development, and the correlative details were interpreted to demonstrate the strengths and advantages of each resource. Finally, recommendations for RH tourism development were put forward based on these value advantages. The findings indicate that analyzing value advantages among similar resources in a competitive setting strengthens conservation and development decisions. Thus, balanced and sustainable development of RH tourism can be accomplished. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Continuing Value of Civil Engineering Heritage)
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