Special Issue "Bioresources and Utilization of Biomass in Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Resources and Sustainable Utilization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. David Patiño Vilas
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Heat Engines and Machines, and Fluids, University of Vigor, Spain
Interests: biomass combustion; pollutant reduction; renewable thermal energy; particulate matter formation; reduction and measurement; CFD modelling; alternative biofuels

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The successful development of renewable energies is mainly determined by the use of many different energy sources. Among them, the use of bioresources (biomass) maintains a strong interest, especially dealing with direct heat generation or using intermediate by-products like syngas, biochar, hydrochar, and other special solid fuels.

The main challenges to massively increasing the use of bioresources could be summed up in three basic research areas:

  1. The viability study of new alternative biofuels that can guarantee a sustainable supply, especially those low-cost and low-grade biomasses with high economic competitiveness without relevant use in other markets. That point includes not only fuel utilization, but also the development of additives, for example.
  2. The development of new utilization or exploitation techniques (technologies) that are affordable and environmentally friendly (low emissions of intermediate products, gases, etc.). Evolution in already stablished technologies, CFD modeling optimization, use of novel deep and machine learning techniques to improve the process control, fouling and slagging reduction measurements, as well as modern active techniques for pollutant emissions reduction are hereby included.
  3. Lastly, all those studies and developments focused on the passive reduction of pollution produced during the thermal conversion are of great interest, too. That includes all the abatement techniques to treat gases, leachates or aerosols (particulate matter) produced all along the productive and use chain of the bioresources.

This Special Issue aims to gather all the edge research framed in any of the aforementioned categories that would help to push forward the boundaries of knowledge in the development and sustainable use of the bioresources.

Thank you for your contributions.

Prof. Dr. David Patiño
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biofuel viability
  • bioresources utilization
  • emissions reduction
  • particulate abatement techniques
  • sustainable energy crops
  • nouvelle biofuel valorization technologies
  • process optimization
  • optimization
  • biofuel characterization
  • waste utilization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Viability of Agricultural and Forestry Residues as Biomass Fuels in the Galicia-North Portugal Region: An Experimental Study
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8206; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198206 - 05 Oct 2020
Abstract
In this study, an experimental approach was utilized to assess the viability of three biomass fuels in a small laboratory-scale combustor. Three feedstocks currently considered as residues were selected based on their widespread presence in the Euroregion Galicia-North Portugal, and some were modified [...] Read more.
In this study, an experimental approach was utilized to assess the viability of three biomass fuels in a small laboratory-scale combustor. Three feedstocks currently considered as residues were selected based on their widespread presence in the Euroregion Galicia-North Portugal, and some were modified to improve their behavior by removing fine particles or adding substances to increase the melting point of the ashes. The experimental facility was a highly modifiable, fixed-bed combustor with air-staging capabilities and a wide array of sensors intended to measure a large quantity of parameters. A series of tests was performed to cover the widest range of total air flows possible for the facility, with values of 0.223, 0.279 and 0.334 kg/m²s being used, while 30% of the total air flow enters from below the combustion bed and 70% over it. Results from the proximate and elemental analyses show high proportions of ash in every fuel compared to commercial wood pellets, and empirical deposition indexes suggest a high risk of fouling and slagging. Testing confirmed the analysis predictions, resulting in the kiwi- and vine-based fuels not being suitable for a facility without ash elimination systems. Some modifications of the gorse fuel showed improved behavior compared to unmodified gorse fuel, namely, the addition of a 2% mass fraction of CaCO3 and the removal of fine particles. The former prevented ash sintering, and the latter greatly decreased the fouling of the heat exchanger tubes. These results suggest that some of the vegetal species studied might be suitable for their use in small-scale biomass burners, and besides the accuracy of one of the deposition indexes used is confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioresources and Utilization of Biomass in Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Novel Test Bench for the Active Reduction of Biomass Particulate Matter Emissions
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010422 - 06 Jan 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
This paper introduces an experimental plant specifically designed to challenge the main operating issues related to modern biomass combustion systems (mainly NOx, particulate matter, and deposition phenomena). The prototype is an 11–18 kW overfed fixed-bed burner with a modular configuration, and [...] Read more.
This paper introduces an experimental plant specifically designed to challenge the main operating issues related to modern biomass combustion systems (mainly NOx, particulate matter, and deposition phenomena). The prototype is an 11–18 kW overfed fixed-bed burner with a modular configuration, and the design considers the implementation of certain strategies for improving combustion: (1) a complete refrigeration system that also includes the fuel bed; and (2) an air injection control through flue gas recirculation. First, the stability and repeatability of the facility were successfully tested, establishing the duration of transient periods in the phase of experiment design. The results revealed similar effects in temperature and particulate emissions when comparing the use of the cooling bed and recirculation techniques. Reductions of 15% and up to 70% were achieved for the exhaust temperature and particulate matter concentration, respectively. Otherwise, the refrigeration considerably reduced the bed temperature, especially in its core, which enhanced the condensation of volatile salts and therefore the fouling phenomena. Although the viability of using both techniques as temperature control methods is demonstrated, further studies are needed to clarify the specific effects of each technology and to clarify the possible significance of a hybrid solution that combines both strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioresources and Utilization of Biomass in Sustainability)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review of Technical and Economic Aspects of Biomass Briquetting
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4609; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114609 - 04 Jun 2020
Cited by 8
Abstract
Growing global demand and utilization of fossil fuels has elevated wealth creation, increased adverse impacts of climate change from greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions, and endangered public health. In most developing countries, biomass wastes, which include but are not limited to agricultural residues, are [...] Read more.
Growing global demand and utilization of fossil fuels has elevated wealth creation, increased adverse impacts of climate change from greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions, and endangered public health. In most developing countries, biomass wastes, which include but are not limited to agricultural residues, are produced in large quantities annually. They are either inefficiently used or disposed of indiscriminately, which threatens the environment. It is possible to convert these wastes, through densification, into high-density and energy-efficient briquettes. Densification of biomass into briquettes presents a renewable energy option as an alternative to fossil fuels. This paper reviews biomass briquetting with reference to biomass resources, feedstock pre-processing, briquetting process parameters, briquetting technology, and briquettes quality evaluation parameters. The review also includes the economic aspect of briquetting relating to costs and feasibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioresources and Utilization of Biomass in Sustainability)
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