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Green Technologies for Urban Water Management

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2022) | Viewed by 11213

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: Green technologies for urban stormwater management (e.g. bioretention systems, green walls) Stormwater quality monitoring & modelling Integrated urban water modelling Water Sensitive Urban Design (sponge city)

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Guest Editor
Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: vegetated water treatment technology; stormwater treatment; greywater treatment; stormwater quantity and quality modelling; stormwater and greywater quality monitoring; alternative water sources for crop production; human interaction with water infrastructure; social science in water engineering

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Guest Editor
Sao Carlos School of Engineering, Dept Hydraulics & Sanitation Engineering, WADI Lab, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos-SP 13566-590, Brazil
Interests: low-carbon sponge cities; climate-resilient green infrastructure; water footprint mitigation; socio-hydrology and citizen science; water-adaptive design; integrated modelling; urban waters’ recycle; water-energy-food nexus valuation; rainwater cleansing; digital/smart water; urban wetland restoration

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Guest Editor
Department of hydraulic and environmental engineering, University of Belgrade, Beograd 11000, Serbia
Interests: pollution dynamics in urban runoff; stormwater management; urban water management; water supply and sanitation; drinking and wastewater treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cities are facing more challenges in the way they deal with urban water. Green technologies, e.g., constructed wetlands, ponds, bioretentions, and porous pavement, are popular solutions labelled as nature friendly for urban water management.

The scope of this special issue contains following:

i.   Treatment & reuse: hydraulic performance, water quality improvement, recycling

ii.   Modelling: process-based models, data-driven approach

iii.   IoT technologies: real time control & monitoring, artificial intelligence

iv.   Planning: water management and planning, agent-based modelling

v.   Climate impact: decarbonization, zero-net water-energy optimization

We not only welcome the continuing novel research on the treatment performance of green technologies, modelling and planning, but also encourage studies employing new ideas (e.g., real time control and monitoring).

We look forward to your contributions to this Special Issue and your help in promoting green technology for urban water management.

Dr. Kefeng Zhang
Dr. Veljko Prodanovic
Prof. Dr. Eduardo Mário Mendiondo
Prof. Dr. Aleksandar Djukić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green infrastructure
  • treatment
  • data-driven
  • Internet of Things
  • planning
  • climate impact
  • resilient cities

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1195 KiB  
Article
Implementation of P-Reactive Layer for Improving Urban Water Quality: Kinetic Studies, Dimensioning and Economic Analysis
by Agnieszka Bus
Sustainability 2022, 14(15), 9151; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159151 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1175
Abstract
Urbanization and climate change affecting water quality are the most critical problems that humanity has to encounter globally. Undoubtedly, urban water bodies are heavily contaminated by phosphorus (P). This study aims to identify the mechanisms and efficiency of the P sorption process for [...] Read more.
Urbanization and climate change affecting water quality are the most critical problems that humanity has to encounter globally. Undoubtedly, urban water bodies are heavily contaminated by phosphorus (P). This study aims to identify the mechanisms and efficiency of the P sorption process for selected reactive materials (Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), Filtralite® Nature P, lightweight expanded clay aggregate (Leca®), limestone, opoka, and zeolite) with surface water as adsorbate and dimension of P-reactive reactive layer supported with economic analysis. Four kinetic models were used to know the sorption mechanism: pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion model. Calculating the P-reactive layer was based on dimensioning rain retention spaces standards. The pseudo-second model provided the best description of the adsorption kinetics of most materials. The sorption properties obtained after 72 h showed the reduction of 83, 81, 59, 53, 37, and 36% for AAC, opoka, Filtralite® Nature P; limestone, Leca®, and zeolite, respectively. Depending on the volume, the P-reactive layer can remove 29–77 or 61–163 g of P-PO4. The unit cost of removing P-PO4 by the P-reactive layer range from 49.57 to 85.53 €/P-PO4 g. For these reasons, reactive materials seem to be an effective way of removing P from the urban water environment worldwide from both environmental and economic points of view. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Technologies for Urban Water Management)
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27 pages, 8372 KiB  
Article
Modular Design of Bioretention Systems for Sustainable Stormwater Management under Drivers of Urbanization and Climate Change
by Marina Batalini de Macedo, Marcus Nóbrega Gomes Júnior, Vivian Jochelavicius, Thalita Raquel Pereira de Oliveira and Eduardo Mario Mendiondo
Sustainability 2022, 14(11), 6799; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14116799 - 1 Jun 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2596
Abstract
The increase in urbanization and climate change projections point to a worsening of floods and urban river contamination. Cities need to adopt adaptive urban drainage measures capable of mitigating these drivers of change. This study presents a practical methodology for a modular design [...] Read more.
The increase in urbanization and climate change projections point to a worsening of floods and urban river contamination. Cities need to adopt adaptive urban drainage measures capable of mitigating these drivers of change. This study presents a practical methodology for a modular design of bioretention systems incorporating land use and climate change into existing sizing methods. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis for these methods was performed. The methodology was applied to a case study in the city of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil. Three application scales were evaluated: property scale (PS), street scale (SS) and neighborhood scale (NS) for three temporal scenarios: current, 2015–2050 and 2050–2100. The choice of the sizing method was the factor with greatest influence on the final bioretention performance, as it considerably affected the surface areas designed, followed by the hydraulic conductivity of the filtering media. When analyzing the sensitivity of the parameters for each method, the runoff coefficient and the daily precipitation with 90% probability were identified as the most sensitive parameters. For the period 2050–2100, there was an increase of up to 2×, 2.5× and 4× in inflow for PS, SS and NS, respectively. However and despite the great uncertainty of future drivers, bioretention performance would remain almost constant in future periods due to modular design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Technologies for Urban Water Management)
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Review

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28 pages, 608 KiB  
Review
Advances in Technological Research for Online and In Situ Water Quality Monitoring—A Review
by Gabriel Marinho e Silva, Daiane Ferreira Campos, José Artur Teixeira Brasil, Marcel Tremblay, Eduardo Mario Mendiondo and Filippo Ghiglieno
Sustainability 2022, 14(9), 5059; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095059 - 22 Apr 2022
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 5425
Abstract
Monitoring water quality is an essential tool for the control of pollutants and pathogens that can cause damage to the environment and human health. However, water quality analysis is usually performed in laboratory environments, often with the use of high-cost equipment and qualified [...] Read more.
Monitoring water quality is an essential tool for the control of pollutants and pathogens that can cause damage to the environment and human health. However, water quality analysis is usually performed in laboratory environments, often with the use of high-cost equipment and qualified professionals. With the progress of nanotechnology and the advance in engineering materials, several studies have shown, in recent years, the development of technologies aimed at monitoring water quality, with the ability to reduce the costs of analysis and accelerate the achievement of results for management and decision-making. In this work, a review was carried out on several low-cost developed technologies and applied in situ for water quality monitoring. Thus, new alternative technologies for the main physical (color, temperature, and turbidity), chemical (chlorine, fluorine, phosphorus, metals, nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, pH, and oxidation–reduction potential), and biological (total coliforms, Escherichia coli, algae, and cyanobacteria) water quality parameters were described. It was observed that there has been an increase in the number of publications related to the topic in recent years, mainly since 2012, with 641 studies being published in 2021. The main new technologies developed are based on optical or electrochemical sensors, however, due to the recent development of these technologies, more robust analyses and evaluations in real conditions are essential to guarantee the precision and repeatability of the methods, especially when it is desirable to compare the values with government regulatory standards. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Technologies for Urban Water Management)
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