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Towards Integrated Watershed Governance for Sustainable Production and Social-Ecological Systems

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Resources and Sustainable Utilization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 3744

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Korea Environment Institute, Sejong 30147, Korea
Interests: integrated watershed governance; ecological health; geomorphology; regional frequency analysis; hydrololgic modeling; climate-land-water interactions; machine learning
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea
Interests: urban hydrology; urban green infrastructure; urban water availability; urban stormwater management; water quality modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon-si 16227, Republic of Korea
Interests: hydrology; environmental engineering; hydrological modeling; spatial–temporal analysis; hydro-meteorology; risk analysis; climate change impacts; statistical analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that we ask you to share your novel research results in the field of integrated watershed governance for sustainable production, social-ecological system, hydrology, hydraulics, water quality, environment, and climate change adaptation in a broad sense to the Special Issue “Resources and Sustainable Utilization” of Sustainability. Integrated water management in watershed governance plays a significant role in building sustainable cities and societies considering water availability, hydroclimate variability, water pollution, and ecological impairment. Furthermore, strategic natural resource management with sustainable utilization can assist in providing solutions for water and environmental issues in the world. Moving toward integrated water governance is highly crucial to solving global issues related to water resource management including complexity and variability under climate change. This Special Issue of Sustainability is envisioned to showcase the state-of-the-art in the adaptation and use of observed data for social-ecological systems, water resources, water quality, aquatic ecosystems, and the natural environment.  

Given the importance and relevance of this Special Issue, we invite researchers to contribute original research articles as well as review articles. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Integrated water governance
  • Water resources management
  • Sustainable social-ecological systems
  • Hydrological/environmental modeling
  • Water quality monitoring
  • River ecosystem resilience
  • Geomorphological processes and characteristics
  • Water policy
  • Environmental assessment
  • Natural disaster risk analysis
  • Machine learning technology

Dr. Kichul Jung
Prof. Dr. Daeryong Park
Prof. Dr. Myoung-Jin Um
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • integrated water management
  • hydrologic/hydraulic/water quality/ecologic modeling
  • stream resilience and aquatic ecosystem enhancement
  • data analysis/statistical analysis/machine learning
  • climate change adaptation
  • sustainable development strategies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 32471 KiB  
Article
Response of Fish Community to Building Block Methodology Mimicking Natural Flow Regime Patterns in Nakdong River in South Korea
by Soohong Kim, Kichul Jung and Hyeongsik Kang
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3587; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063587 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1743
Abstract
Water regulation and flood control of rivers are changing due to streamflow depletion following industrialization and urbanization, significantly impacting aquatic ecosystems. Therefore, restoration of the ecological environment is necessary to maintain a healthy river ecosystem. For ecosystem restoration, the amount of discharge from [...] Read more.
Water regulation and flood control of rivers are changing due to streamflow depletion following industrialization and urbanization, significantly impacting aquatic ecosystems. Therefore, restoration of the ecological environment is necessary to maintain a healthy river ecosystem. For ecosystem restoration, the amount of discharge from dams must be controlled and the appropriate environmental flow must be calculated according to the fish species. The change in the flow through the dam due to hydropeaking directly impacts the fish. This study aimed to construct a building block methodology (BBM) using dam inflows in the Gudam Bridge basin upstream of the Nakdong River, build a River2D model of this area, and calculate the natural flow regime and the weighted usable area (WUA). The analysis of the scenarios for the whole period (2006–2020) and by flow regime showed that WUA decreased in some periods, but improved overall in the scenario reflecting the BBM. For Zacco platypus, a dominant fish species of the Gudam Bridge, WUA decreased by ~11% in some periods (in September) but the habitat improvement effect measured up to 79%. Changing the dam discharge pattern by considering the flow regime seemed more effective in improving the habitat of fish living downstream. Full article
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22 pages, 8403 KiB  
Article
Safety First? Lessons from the Hapcheon Dam Flood in 2020
by Taesam Lee, Kiyoung Seong, Seung Oh Lee and Hyung Ju Yoo
Sustainability 2022, 14(5), 2975; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14052975 - 3 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1496
Abstract
Floods change the living environment and threaten public health, while dam construction has often been made to protect and mitigate floods. Meanwhile, an exceptionally high outflow, five times higher than the maximum historical outflow, was discharged on 8 August 2020 from the Hapcheon [...] Read more.
Floods change the living environment and threaten public health, while dam construction has often been made to protect and mitigate floods. Meanwhile, an exceptionally high outflow, five times higher than the maximum historical outflow, was discharged on 8 August 2020 from the Hapcheon Dam (HCD), which is located at the middle of the Hwang River, South Korea. As a result, the 2020 flood event occurred in the downstream area, flooding the villages located downstream of the HCD, and damaging agricultural and residential areas. The current study investigates the cause of the flood and how the outflow affected the downstream area. The investigation showed that the Hwang River and the streams connected to the Hwang River experienced piping and overflow in several levees downstream. The frequency analysis of the rainfall upstream and the inflow to the HCD illustrated that the rainfall return periods are only 5–30 years for different durations. The return period of inflow to the HCD was only approximately five years. Sustaining a high-water level before the flooding season for future environmental use caused an exceptionally high outflow. Lowering the water level might have prevented damage to the downstream area. The 2020 flood event provided an imperative lesson to water managers and policymakers, demonstrating that the HCD and downstream safety must be prioritized over water conservation for environmental use. Full article
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