Special Issue "Sustainable Urban Transport Policy in the Context of New Mobility"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Yacan Wang
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Guest Editor
School of Economics and Management, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing, China
Interests: transportation economics; sustainable transport system; transport behavior response
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Andrea Cirà
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Guest Editor
Department of Economics, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: transport economics and sustainability; model choice in transport economics and tourism; tourism research; bioeconomics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Ioppolo
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Guest Editor
Department of Economics, University of Messina, Italy
Interests: environmental management; industrial ecology; environmental governance; local development
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Hongchang Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Economics and Management, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing, China
Interests: transportation economics; transport policy; transport planning and evaluation; transport governance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Driven by ICT development and smartphone application popularization (Shaheen et al, 2016), new forms of mobility such as bike-sharing (DeMaio, 2009; Cao et al, 2018), car sharing (Furuhata, 2013; Dowling, 2018), sharing freight and logistics (Krajewska et al, 2008; Gonzalez-Feliu & Morana, 2011) and so on have developed very quickly in the recent decades worldwide. Transport policy plays an essential role in bringing urban transportation into a desirable future (Gössling, 2018). How to design technologically, financially, and environmentally sustainable transport policies accommodating new mobility and business models is a very challenging problem faces by urban transport policy makers (Dowling and Kent, 2015).

In this Special Issue, we call attention to theoretical and empirical studies on sustainable urban transport policy driven by new mobility. This Special Issue will provide a platform for exchanging knowledge on emerging methods, practical implementation, and lessons learned concerning theoretical and empirical problems of sustainable urban transport policies related to new mobility. Specifically, the guest editors encourage submissions of original research articles with key words or directions including but not limited to:

  • Recent development of new mobility and its impact on transport;
  • New forms of transport services, business models driven by technology innovation;
  • Transport policy challenges especially brought forth by sharing transport faced by policy makers;
  • Fundamental theories as to regulation and governance of new types of mobility;
  • Theoretical research advancement as to sharing transport and beyond;
  • Quantitative modeling and big data analysis of the impacts of urban transport policy;
  • Case studies of pros and cons on sustainable urban transport policy on new mobility in China and other countries;
  • Co-ordinations and co-operations of anti-monopoly and industrial regulation needed to develop sustainable transport policy on new mobility;
  • Stakeholder analysis of the design of sustainable urban transport policy on new mobility.

References:

Shaheen, S., Cohen, A., & Zohdy, I. (2016). Shared mobility: current practices and guiding principles (No. FHWA-HOP-16-022).

Shaheen, S., Cohen, A., Zohdy, I., & Kock, B. (2016). Smartphone applications to influence travel choices: practices and policies (No. FHWA-HOP-16-023).

Furuhata, M., Dessouky, M., Ordóñez, F., Brunet, M. E., Wang, X., & Koenig, S. (2013). Ridesharing: The state-of-the-art and future directions. Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, 57, 28-46.

Dowling, R., Maalsen, S., & Kent, J. L. (2018). Sharing as sociomaterial practice: Car sharing and the material reconstitution of automobility. Geoforum, 88, 10-16.

Krajewska, M. A., Kopfer, H., Laporte, G., Ropke, S., & Zaccour, G. (2008). Horizontal cooperation among freight carriers: request allocation and profit sharing. Journal of the Operational Research Society, 59(11), 1483-1491.

Gonzalez-Feliu, J., & Morana, J. (2011). Collaborative transportation sharing: from theory to practice via a case study from France. In Technologies for supporting reasoning communities and collaborative decision making: Cooperative approaches (pp. 252-271). IGI Global.

Gössling, S., Cohen, S., Higham, J., Peeters, P., & Eijgelaar, E. (2018). Desirable transport futures.Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 61, 301-309.

Dowling, R., & Kent, J. (2015). Practice and public–private partnerships in sustainable transport governance: The case of car sharing in Sydney, Australia. Transport Policy, 40, 58-64.

Kc-claffy, & Clark, D. (2014). Platform models for sustainable Internet regulation. Journal of Information Policy, 4, 463-488.

Arbolino, R., Carlucci, F., Cirà, A., De Simone, L., Ioppolo, G., Yigitcanlar, T. (2018) Factors affecting transport privatization: An empirical analysis of the EU. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice (110), 149-160

Yigitcanlar, T., Kamruzzaman, Md., Buys, L., Ioppolo, G., Sabatini-Marques, J., Moreira da Costa, E., Yun J.J. (2018) Understanding ‘smart cities’: Intertwining development drivers with desired outcomes in a multidimensional framework. Cities 81, 145-160

Prof. Yacan Wang
Prof. Dr. Andrea Cirà
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Ioppolo
Prof. Dr. Hongchang Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • sustainable urban transportation
  • new mobility
  • transport policy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mixed Logit Model Based on Improved Nonlinear Utility Functions: A Market Shares Solution Method of Different Railway Traffic Modes
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1406; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041406 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
In recent years, with the development of high-speed railway in China, the railway operating mileages and passenger transport capacity have increased rapidly. Due to the high density of trains and the limited capacity of railways, it is necessary to solve market shares of [...] Read more.
In recent years, with the development of high-speed railway in China, the railway operating mileages and passenger transport capacity have increased rapidly. Due to the high density of trains and the limited capacity of railways, it is necessary to solve market shares of different railway traffic modes in order to adjust the operation plans appropriately and run railway passenger transport products in line with passenger demand. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to calculate market shares by formulating a mixed logit model based on improved nonlinear utility functions taking different factors into consideration, such as seat grades, fares, running time, passenger income levels and so on. Firstly according to maximum likelihood estimation, the likelihood function of this mixed logit model is proposed to maximize utility of all passenger groups. After that, we propose two improved algorithms based on the simulated annealing algorithm (ISAA-CC and ISAA-SS) to estimate the unknown parameters and solve the optimal solution of this model in order to enhance the computational efficiency. Finally, a real-world instance with related data of Beijing–Tianjin corridor, is implemented to demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of the proposed approaches. In addition, by performing this numerical experiment and comparing these two improved algorithms with the traditional Newton method, the ant colony algorithm and the simulated annealing algorithm, we prove that the improved algorithms we developed are superior to others in the optimal solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Transport Policy in the Context of New Mobility)
Open AccessArticle
Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Bike-Sharing Usage around Rail Transit Stations: Evidence from Beijing, China
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1299; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041299 (registering DOI) - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
As an emerging mode of transport, bike-sharing is being quickly accepted by Chinese residents due to its convenience and environmental friendliness. As hotspots for bike-sharing, railway-station service areas attract thousands of bikes during peak hours, which can block roads and pedestrian walkways. Of [...] Read more.
As an emerging mode of transport, bike-sharing is being quickly accepted by Chinese residents due to its convenience and environmental friendliness. As hotspots for bike-sharing, railway-station service areas attract thousands of bikes during peak hours, which can block roads and pedestrian walkways. Of the many works devoted to the connection between bikes and rail, few have addressed the spatial‒temporal pattern of bike-sharing accumulating around station service areas. In this work, we investigate the distribution patterns of bike-sharing in station service areas, which are influenced not only by railway-station ridership but also by the built environment around the station, illustrating obvious spatial heterogeneity. To this end, we established a geographic weighted regression (GWR) model to capture this feature considering the variables of passenger flow and the built environment. Using the data from bike-sharing in Beijing, China, we applied the GWR model to carry out a spatiotemporal characteristic analysis of the relationship between bike-sharing usage in railway-station service areas and its determinants, including the passenger flow in stations, land use, bus lines, and road-network characteristics. The influence of these factors on bike-sharing usage is quite different in time and space. For instance, bus lines are a competing mode of transport with bike-sharing in suburban areas but not in city centers, whereas industrial and residential areas could also heavily affect the bike-sharing demand as well as railway-station ridership. The results of this work can help facilitate the dynamic allocation of bike-sharing and increase the efficiency of this emerging mode of transport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Transport Policy in the Context of New Mobility)
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Open AccessArticle
Research on the Relationship between the Individual Characteristics of Electric Bike Riders and Illegal Speeding Behavior: A Questionnaire-Based Study
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030799 - 21 Jan 2020
Abstract
To examine the relationship between electric bike riders’ individual characteristics and their riding speed, this paper obtained 350 valid survey responses from e-bike riders using an on-site sampling survey method. Using the non-aggregate theory, we take the individual attributes of the rider’s age, [...] Read more.
To examine the relationship between electric bike riders’ individual characteristics and their riding speed, this paper obtained 350 valid survey responses from e-bike riders using an on-site sampling survey method. Using the non-aggregate theory, we take the individual attributes of the rider’s age, driving age, personality, and corrective vision as potential influencing factors. The metric model of the influencing factors of the rider’s personal characteristics on riding speed is established, and we analyze the sensitivity of many influencing factors by using the theory of elasticity. The results show that the absolute value of the elasticity value corresponding to the rider’s gender, age, corrected visual acuity, and other factors is less than 1, which indicates that the above factors have no flexibility regarding the rider’s riding speed selection behavior. However, in four selection intervals, the elasticity values of the rider’s education level are 1.577, 2.484, 1.810, and 1.667; those of their driving age are −1.537, −2.061, −1.547, and −1.606, and those of their riding proficiency are 3.302, 12.038, 10.370, and 11.177, which indicate that the three factors of rider’s education level, driving age, and riding proficiency have a significant impact on the riding speed choice behavior. The finding of the study is helpful for the relevant government departments to formulate more accurate classified intervention measures, and effectively prevent the occurrence of illegal speeding behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Transport Policy in the Context of New Mobility)
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Open AccessArticle
Dynamic Crosswalk Signal Timing Optimization Model Considering Vehicle and Pedestrian Delays and Fuel Consumption Cost
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 689; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020689 - 17 Jan 2020
Abstract
Due to the development of video perception technology, obtaining the volume of pedestrians and vehicles at a crosswalk has become much easier. Based on this development, this paper proposes a dynamic crosswalk signal timing optimization model and then analyzes the effects for three [...] Read more.
Due to the development of video perception technology, obtaining the volume of pedestrians and vehicles at a crosswalk has become much easier. Based on this development, this paper proposes a dynamic crosswalk signal timing optimization model and then analyzes the effects for three different signal timing strategies. First, we propose the dynamic signal timing optimization model by involving the delays of pedestrians and vehicles, as well as the fuel consumption cost, simultaneously. In the model, we design a dynamic signal timing strategy, using the volume of past cycles to predict the present volume, and then calculate the optimal signal timing by minimizing the total cost of the system. Second, the model is applied to a crosswalk in Beijing, China, as an example, and we compare and analyze the results of three timing strategies: Dynamic signal timing, optimal fixed timing, and current fixed timing. The results show that the dynamic signal timing is more efficient during the morning peak hour in terms of decreasing the total cost. Compared to the current fixed timing result, the vehicle delay and the fuel consumption decrease, while the pedestrian delay increases in both morning peak hour and flat hour for the other two signal timing strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Transport Policy in the Context of New Mobility)
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Open AccessArticle
The Underlying Reasons behind the Development of Public Electric Buses in China: The Beijing Case
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020688 - 17 Jan 2020
Abstract
After great efforts towards the development of the electric vehicle (EV) industry and the use of its products in public transportation networks, more electric buses operate in China than in any other country in the world. As more investors will enter the industry, [...] Read more.
After great efforts towards the development of the electric vehicle (EV) industry and the use of its products in public transportation networks, more electric buses operate in China than in any other country in the world. As more investors will enter the industry, the effect of new participants on the development of the EV industry becomes an important issue. Based on the analysis of several key stakeholders (central and local governments, electric bus producers, users/bus companies, and providers of charging infrastructure in public transportation, this paper constructs a dynamic game-theory model to determine the main participants and their strategic space payoff functions, and ultimately estimates a Nash equilibrium. The dynamic game-model analysis clearly shows that the government’s decision to provide subsidies or not is currently affecting the entire industry and is an important prerequisite for a dynamic game. The user decides the pace of the development of this industry and the user’s management efficiency is a key factor affecting users’ needs. In addition, the availability of EVs and charging station facilities are equally important to the development of the industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Transport Policy in the Context of New Mobility)
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Open AccessArticle
The Impact of the Freight Transport Modal Shift Policy on China’s Carbon Emissions Reduction
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 583; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020583 - 13 Jan 2020
Abstract
How to reduce the negative transport externalities, especially its carbon emissions, without having significant negative influence on economic and social development is the key for sustainable development in China. This paper explores the impacts of China’s recent modal shift policy on carbon emissions, [...] Read more.
How to reduce the negative transport externalities, especially its carbon emissions, without having significant negative influence on economic and social development is the key for sustainable development in China. This paper explores the impacts of China’s recent modal shift policy on carbon emissions, summaries experience from China, and points out future development directions. The paper first compares the different energy consumption and carbon emissions between the road freight transport and the railways in China, and then has a scenarios analysis on China’s energy consumption and carbon emissions of the transport sector in 2025. The latest progress and major problems of modal shift policy in China are presented, and a methodology to address this problem is also proposed. Based on the methodology, we compare the benefits and costs brought by modal shift policy in the case of Ordos, Inner Mongolia. Based on the results, principles and suggestions on how to design and implement more efficient modal shift policy are proposed. We find that road transport is the most polluting mode among various modes of transport, and the railway transport has the least carbon emissions. Furthermore, the modal shift policy plays a positive role in carbon emissions, but the costs caused by the policy are higher than the benefits at some circumstances. Moreover, to achieve the sustainable modal shift policy by relying on the feasible market mechanism, together with scientific and effective regulation, instead of “one size for all” administrative policy, are likely the way forward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Transport Policy in the Context of New Mobility)
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