Special Issue "Sustainable Health and Quality of Life in Urban Areas"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Roberta Cocci Grifoni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Design, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Interests: computational fluid dynamics (CFD); nature based solutions (NbS) for outdoor thermal comfort; urban heat island (UHI); analysis and mitigation of the local microclimate in order to achieve better environmental quality; climate change and urban health
Dr. Maria Federica Ottone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Design, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Interests: methodologies and strategies for urban regeneration and innovations in technologies and sustainable materials; design and technologies of NbS; design and technologies of urban/buildings interfaces
Dr. Rosalba D’Onofrio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Design, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Interests: urban planning and urban regeneration in particular on urban health and wellbeing in cities
Dr. Elio Trusiani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Design, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Interests: urban planning and urban regeneration; landscape planning and cultural heritage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fifty-five percent of the world’s population lives in cities, and according to a report by the International Resource Panel instituted within the UN’s Environment Programme (UNEP) by 2050 a good 2.5 billion people will move to urban areas, with an expected 125% increase in natural resource consumption. The international scientific community and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2019) maintain that the effects of extreme climate events are further aggravated by human activities. Global climate change thus represents an emergency being felt increasingly even on the local scale. In particular, various studies have shown how cities are affected by extreme climate phenomena such as heatwaves, increasingly frequent and intense precipitation, and atmospheric pollution. All these aspects generate uncomfortable conditions and reduce the quality of life. To contrast or limit the impact of these phenomena, improve urban territory’s resilience to environmental stresses, and increase urban health,  actions to reduce impermeabilization, renaturalize the land, enable urban forestation, and to adjust systems and societies to withstand the impacts of climate change have to be developed. The current scientific debate is focused on the need to formulate effective policies for adaptation and mitigation to climate change. In particular, most adaptation studies deal with governance, social learning, and vulnerability assessments, while paying little attention to physical planning and urban design interventions. There is a clear mismatch between the long time horizons of climate change impacts and the effects of adaptation actions; between the costs of adaptation planning that tend to arise in the short term and the benefits that often materialize in the long run.

The concept of “urban health” and the role of urban design in the quality promotion of the cities’ living spaces has been present in the international debate for some decades, but only since the publication of the “New Urban Agenda” (WHO 2016), health has been defined as “one of the most effective markers of any city’s sustainable development”. Moreover, the pandemic emergency we are experiencing imposes even more compelling reflection on the relationship between health and the city, and on the role of research and city administration to understand what the city of the future will be like. Within this framework, the special issue wants to promote research methodologies and tools to deal with the effects of climate change on urban health and equity in assessing urban regeneration in healthy cities and limiting  climate change effects on health and equity in urban contexts. It wants, also, identifying urban planning measures and tools that implement the climate change adaptation and mitigation actions concretely, avoiding too long times.

Dr. Roberta Cocci Grifoni
Dr. Maria Federica Ottone
Dr. Rosalba D’Onofrio
Dr. Elio Trusiani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nature based solutions
  • urban heat island
  • air pollution
  • urban modelling
  • urban health
  • urban governance
  • urban planning
  • urban regeneration
  • sustainable design

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Selecting a Contextualized Set of Urban Quality of Life Indicators: Results of a Delphi Consensus Procedure
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 4945; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13094945 - 28 Apr 2021
Viewed by 233
Abstract
Although indicators are commonly used to measure/assess urban quality of life (QOL), there is no consensus in the literature on the core indicators of urban QOL. This paper aims to identify a set of key indicators that will be used to assess/measure urban [...] Read more.
Although indicators are commonly used to measure/assess urban quality of life (QOL), there is no consensus in the literature on the core indicators of urban QOL. This paper aims to identify a set of key indicators that will be used to assess/measure urban QOL in the Saudi Arabia (SA) context. For this purpose, a three-round online Delphi procedure is used. A group of 92 local experts were asked to rate the importance of a set of pre-defined indicators in assessing/measuring urban QOL. The results reveal that the panel of experts reached consensus and agreed on the high importance of 53 indicators for assessing/measuring urban QOL. These indicators provide appropriate coverage of the three core dimensions of urban QOL: environmental, social and economic. However, the results also show that the social indicators are perceived as more essential than economic and environmental indicators. This finding has practical implications for designing and developing QOL assessment tools to better capture and measure urban QOL in the SA context. Furthermore, research findings also identified some methodological limitations associated with using the Delphi approach, which need to be addressed to ensure the development of comprehensive QOL assessment tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Health and Quality of Life in Urban Areas)
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