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Special Issue "Cognition and Education: How to Create a Sustainable Bridge"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2022 | Viewed by 2661

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Demis Basso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cognitive and Educational Sciences Lab., Faculty of Education, Free University of Bolzano, Bressanone-Brixen, BZ 39042, Italy
Interests: visuo-spatial planning, prospective memory, visuo-spatial working memory, attention and inhibition processes, with relevance on education
Dr. Milvia Cottini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cognitive and Educational Sciences Lab., Faculty of Education, Free University of Bolzano, Bressanone-Brixen, BZ 39042, Italy
Interests: cognitive development in preschool and school-aged children with particular focus on: prospective memory, working memory, metacognition, executive functions, bilingualism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is no doubt that cognition and education are two fertile research fields. In recent years, they have contributed to extend theories as well as to help and form practitioners. Cognition has contributed to increase our knowledge of human processes and skills, while education has promoted new and efficient instructional methods and educational programs.

However, in the last decade many scholars have questioned the interaction between these two disciplines. Conferences, papers, and journals addressed the matter, evaluating whether and how a common ground could exist. Moreover, they allowed experts to merge their perspectives around a common table and discuss their own findings.

Although some results obtained in the psychological domain are evaluated and included in the educational field, it often happens that findings are misinterpreted and lead to the creation of false beliefs. In addition, the two disciplines are not offered a concrete and sustainable opportunity to share their methods and results. On the one hand, practitioners are given several "to-do" and "not-to-do" lists; on the other hand, they push researchers to fulfil to their own “desires” lists. This vicious mechanism is detrimental to the development of both psychological and educational research fields. We strongly believe that there must be other ways for the two fields to communicate with each other.

Rather than positing criticism to what is lacking, the main intention of the Special Issue consists in collecting a series of papers which would constructively contribute to create a sustainable virtuous circle. Therefore, this Special Issue is expected to publish papers that provide examples to both researchers and practitioners in psychology and education about how to design learning methods and environments in a sustainable way. Consequently, a secondary aim will be the promotion of wellbeing and of more effective learners.

With contributions from leading researchers in educational psychology, we try to establish a useful and relevant frame of reference about how the two disciplines could converge to each other. Moreover, experts in both psychological and educational domains are asked to find a way to communicate relevant issues in their research to experts in the other reciprocal domain. Therefore, the Special Issue expects not only submissions from the conjunction of the two research fields, but solicits leading experts in their respective fields to submit papers about how their findings could produce relevant outcomes and stimulate research in the other field.

We look forward to receiving your contributions, which would move the discussion between cognition and education onto a more beneficial and fruitful level.

Prof. Dr. Demis Basso
Dr. Milvia Cottini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • general psychology
  • education
  • developmental psychology
  • cognitive processes
  • methods and procedures

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Definitional Skills as a Bridge towards School Achievement
Sustainability 2022, 14(1), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010286 - 28 Dec 2021
Viewed by 256
Abstract
The general aim of the current study was to investigate the role of definitional skills in promoting primary school achievement (third- to fifth graders) and how school learning may shape definitional skills. Marks from four school subjects, linguistic (Italian and English) and scientific [...] Read more.
The general aim of the current study was to investigate the role of definitional skills in promoting primary school achievement (third- to fifth graders) and how school learning may shape definitional skills. Marks from four school subjects, linguistic (Italian and English) and scientific (Math and Science) were collected as well as scores in a Definitional Task. These two domains were chosen as they clearly entail the two different definition types, that is, lexicographic and scientific. Results indicated that scientific school subject marks are more predictive of definitional skills than linguistic school marks are. The opposite direction (i.e., how definitional skills are predictive of school achievement) appears less clear. In sum, the results, although preliminary, suggest that definitional skills represent a bridge towards school achievement as they promote good marks in all disciplines. Moreover, definitional skills are predicted from levels of competence acquired especially in scientific school subjects that request a higher degree of formal/organized learning. It is then of primary importance to promote interaction–integration between these two kinds of concepts via formal schooling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognition and Education: How to Create a Sustainable Bridge)
Article
What Influences Attitudes and Confidence in Teaching Physics and Technology Topics? An Investigation in Kindergarten and Primary-School Trainee Teachers
Sustainability 2022, 14(1), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010087 - 22 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 926
Abstract
This study investigated the correlations of general knowledge, vocational interests, and personality with trainee teachers’ attitudes and perceived capabilities in teaching physics and technology topics in kindergarten and primary school. A quantitative survey was composed using the Nature–Human–Society questionnaire, the general knowledge test [...] Read more.
This study investigated the correlations of general knowledge, vocational interests, and personality with trainee teachers’ attitudes and perceived capabilities in teaching physics and technology topics in kindergarten and primary school. A quantitative survey was composed using the Nature–Human–Society questionnaire, the general knowledge test BOWIT, the general interest structure test AIST-R, and the 10-item Big Five Inventory. The sample consisted of 196 female trainee teachers for kindergarten and primary school, and the results showed that only a few trainee teachers favoured teaching physics and technology topics. The bivariate analyses indicated that investigative and realistic interests were highly correlated with their confidence in teaching physics and technology topics, followed by significant relationships with possessing general knowledge in science and technology. The relationships with personality, especially neuroticism and extraversion, were also evident, but they were not as strong. The results were further differentiated in various subgroups (i.e., a group who favoured teaching physics and technology topics versus a group who did not, as well as a group with the typical interest profile of kindergarten and primary-school teachers versus a group with a social and investigative interest profile), which provided additional insights. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognition and Education: How to Create a Sustainable Bridge)
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Article
Different Impact of Perceptual Fluency and Schema Congruency on Sustainable Learning
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7040; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137040 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 572
Abstract
Perceptual fluency, that is, the ease with which people perceive information, has diverse effects on cognition and learning. For example, when judging the truth of plausible but incorrect information, easy-to-read statements are incorrectly judged as true while difficult to read statements are not. [...] Read more.
Perceptual fluency, that is, the ease with which people perceive information, has diverse effects on cognition and learning. For example, when judging the truth of plausible but incorrect information, easy-to-read statements are incorrectly judged as true while difficult to read statements are not. As we better remember information that is consistent with pre-existing schemata (i.e., schema congruency), statements judged as true should be remembered better, which would suggest that fluency boosts memory. Another line of research suggests that learning information from hard-to-read statements enhances subsequent memory compared to easy-to-read statements (i.e., desirable difficulties). In the present study, we tested these possibilities in two experiments with student participants. In the study phase, they read plausible statements that were either easy or difficult to read and judged their truth. To assess the sustainability of learning, the test phase in which we tested recognition memory for these statements was delayed for 24 h. In Experiment 1, we manipulated fluency by presenting the statements in colors that made them easy or difficult to read. In Experiment 2, we manipulated fluency by presenting the statements in font types that made them easy or difficult to read. Moreover, in Experiment 2, memory was tested either immediately or after a 24 h delay. In both experiments, the results showed a consistent effect of schema congruency, but perceptual fluency did not affect sustainable learning. However, in the immediate test of Experiment 2, perceptual fluency enhanced memory for schema-incongruent materials. Thus, perceptual fluency can boost initial memory for schema-incongruent memory most likely due to short-lived perceptual traces, which are cropped during consolidation, but does not boost sustainable learning. We discuss these results in relation to research on the role of desirable difficulties for student learning, to effects of cognitive conflict on subsequent memory, and more generally in how to design learning methods and environments in a sustainable way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognition and Education: How to Create a Sustainable Bridge)
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