Special Issue "City Branding and Sustainable Destination Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Young-joo Ahn
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Tourism Industry Data Analytics Lab: TIDAL, Sejong University, Seoul, Korea
Interests: destination marketing and management; consumer behavior; aging and life-span development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

City branding presents a city with a memorable identity and the core values of a city. The city identity is a complex mixture of economic, social, cultural, and environmental aspects of the city (Kavarizis and Ashworth, 2005; Kavaratzis, 2009). The purpose of this Special Issue is to share various topics of city branding and sustainable destination management. Previous studies have indicated that competitive city brands maximize advantages such as positive destination reputation, strong landmark identity, investment for city regeneration, and hosting mega events (Zhang and Zhao, 2009).

Competitive city brands adopt correct strategies to successfully represent distinct and attractive characteristics of the city and maximize advantages of a successful city brand, such as the strong reputation of tourism attractions, more attractive investment, and city regeneration (Parkerson and Saunders, 2005; Zhang and Zhao, 2009). However, various stakeholders (i.e., residents, private sectors, tourists, nongovernment organizations, local and central government) need to be involved in developing competitive city brands. These successful city brands can increase quality of life. Moreover, the engagement and supportive behavior of various stakeholders are a key factor to create a consistent city brand sustainably (Ahn, Hyun, and Kim, 2016).

Recently, many issues have reared their head, such as overtourism, city regeneration, and environmental issues for sustainable tourism. In addition, a top–down city brand implementation under authorities develops more distinctive cities, such as smart city, industrial city, slow city, and cultural and heritage city. This Special Issue will embrace the emerging and essential conceptual and empirical research on city branding and sustainable destination development.

References:

Ahn, Y., Hyun, S. S., & Kim, I. (2016). City residents’ perception of MICE city brand orientation and their brand citizenship behavior: A case study of Busan, South Korea. Asia Pacific of Tourism Research. Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research, 21(3), 328-353.

Kavaratzis, M. (2009). Cities and their brands: Lessons from corporate branding. Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, 5(1), 26–37.

Kavaratzis, M., & Ashworth, G. (2005). City branding: An effective assertion of identity or a transitory marketing trick? Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, 2(3), 506–514.

Parkerson, B., & Saunders, J. (2005). City branding: Can goods and services branding models be used to brand cities? Place Branding, 1(3), 242–264.

Zhang, L., & Zhao, S. X. (2009). City branding and the Olympic effect: A case study of Beijing. Cities, 26(5), 245–254.

Dr. Young-joo Ahn
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • city branding
  • destination management
  • stakeholders
  • sustainable tourism development

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Impact of Short Food Videos on the Tourist Destination Image—Take Chengdu as an Example
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6739; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176739 - 20 Aug 2020
Abstract
Taking Chengdu as an example, based on the destination image theory and employing the content analysis methodology, this paper conducts data mining on the online comment texts of TikTok short food videos, and analyzes the impact of short food videos on the destination [...] Read more.
Taking Chengdu as an example, based on the destination image theory and employing the content analysis methodology, this paper conducts data mining on the online comment texts of TikTok short food videos, and analyzes the impact of short food videos on the destination image (cognitive image, affective image and conative image). The results show that: (1) in terms of cognitive image, short food videos have increased potential tourists’ attention to the destination image, especially their attention to the flavor characteristics of food in the destination and the local social environment; (2) in terms of affective image, the comments of short food videos are mainly neutral and positive, and the contents about the flavor characteristics of food and the local social environment are more likely to affect the affective image of the destination; and (3) in terms of conative image, the appearance description of food in short food videos brings about an obvious effect of intention, and it also creates the demand to travel together and obtain information. This paper is inspiring for city managers and tourism marketers to use TikTok short videos to establish and disseminate food-based city brands and destination images. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Branding and Sustainable Destination Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Determinants of Smart Tourist Environmentally Responsible Behavior Using an Extended Norm-Activation Model
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4934; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124934 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The emergence of the smart tourism paradigm has shifted some research attention to the technologies that drive innovations. However, tourism destinations are not freed from the usual threats in the tourism industry. Environmental impacts have remained a fundamental concern for any destinations regardless [...] Read more.
The emergence of the smart tourism paradigm has shifted some research attention to the technologies that drive innovations. However, tourism destinations are not freed from the usual threats in the tourism industry. Environmental impacts have remained a fundamental concern for any destinations regardless of their adoption and incorporation of smart technologies. Tourists remain a critical source of harm inflicted on environmental systems. Thus, this present study aims to study smart tourists’ environmentally responsible behavior using an extended norm-activation model. The study model incorporates two new constructs measuring the involvement of culture and attitude towards cultural conservation as additional predictors of environmentally responsible behavior. A total sample of 554 is subjected to data analysis. The results support all proposed hypotheses. Both newly added constructs produce the largest total impact scores on the final construct. Model comparison between the study model and the original framework showed improved predictive ability while retaining superior fit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Branding and Sustainable Destination Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Role of a City Council in a Place Branding Campaign: The Case of Vic in Catalonia
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4420; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114420 - 28 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The fundamental goal of this article is to show the implications that place branding has for regional public management through a case study of the brand “Vic, a city with a human dimension” [Vic, ciutat a la mesura humana, in Catalan language], a [...] Read more.
The fundamental goal of this article is to show the implications that place branding has for regional public management through a case study of the brand “Vic, a city with a human dimension” [Vic, ciutat a la mesura humana, in Catalan language], a project commissioned by the city council of Vic and carried out by the city’s university (University of Vic-Central University of Catalonia). Vic is the capital of the Osona region, in the centre of Catalonia, with a population of 45,040 inhabitants. Methodologically, this research utilised 14 focus group discussions, two in-depth interviews and a survey addressed to citizens and answered by 855 people. In regards to results, the research shows that the practice of place branding transcends the traditional action areas of place marketing and place promotion, in order to be fully integrated in the region’s overall management policies, that is to say, its urban governance. The article also concludes that the processes of conceptualisation and implementation of new place brands must be framed within a bottom-up approach, integrating all the stakeholders (public–private cooperation) in the decision-making process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Branding and Sustainable Destination Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Tourist-Perceived Quality and Loyalty Intentions towards Rural Tourism in China
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3614; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093614 - 30 Apr 2020
Cited by 7
Abstract
The growing interest in ruralism among Chinese people has been observed as China’s population in urban areas has exceeded its rural population. Rural tourism has become one of the leading tourism sectors in China, in large part because many of China’s popular tourist [...] Read more.
The growing interest in ruralism among Chinese people has been observed as China’s population in urban areas has exceeded its rural population. Rural tourism has become one of the leading tourism sectors in China, in large part because many of China’s popular tourist attractions are surrounded by rural communities. This study identified 12 dimensions of tourist-perceived quality. In addition, perceived value and satisfaction were used as mediators to explain the relationships between perceived quality and three dimensions of behavioral intentions (i.e., revisitation intention, positive word-of-mouth, and willingness to pay for special rural products). Furthermore, the moderating impact of urban versus rural residence was tested. A total sample of 495 was used for data analysis. Four tourist-perceived quality dimensions (i.e., tourism infrastructure and transportation, hospitality and learning, handicrafts and culture, and rural environment) were found. The results of this study demonstrated the empirical evidence of the relationship between perceived quality, perceived value, satisfaction, and behavioral intentions. Finally, the results showed a moderating effect. The findings of this study can contribute to increasing various behavioral intentions and sustainable rural tourism in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Branding and Sustainable Destination Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Living as Residents in a Tourist Destination: A Phenomenological Approach
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1836; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051836 - 29 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Many people have lived in tourist destinations even before such areas became well known, and will continue to live in these areas whether tourism is successful or not. This study explores residents’ subjective thoughts and perspectives by using a phenomenological methodology. Phenomenology is [...] Read more.
Many people have lived in tourist destinations even before such areas became well known, and will continue to live in these areas whether tourism is successful or not. This study explores residents’ subjective thoughts and perspectives by using a phenomenological methodology. Phenomenology is a theory that seek to understand an individual’s recognition of their own subjectivity rather than explaining objective factors about an individual. We collected data from interviews with 13 residents of Bulguk-dong Gyeongju City, which has long experienced the ups and downs of being a tourist destination. The phenomenological results were expressed as three themes: (1) Being a resident with an inevitable choice, (2) the meaning of tourism in the lived experience as a resident, (3) the formation of conflicts. In conclusion, the lived experience of the residents at the tourist destination is considered “a route for individuals to protect themselves within an ever-changing social structure”. From this perspective, the tourism industry must have multilateral and detailed information about residents, and not just assume that the residents have either a positive or negative attitude towards tourism development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Branding and Sustainable Destination Management)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Factors Determining City Brand Equity—A Systematic Literature Review
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 7858; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12197858 - 23 Sep 2020
Abstract
The aim of this study is to analyze factors determining city brand equity (CBE) on the bases of a systematic literature review (SLR) according to a procedure developed by Tranfield. Five databases were searched (Scopus, Web of Sciences, Google Scholar, EBSCO, and Elsevier) [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to analyze factors determining city brand equity (CBE) on the bases of a systematic literature review (SLR) according to a procedure developed by Tranfield. Five databases were searched (Scopus, Web of Sciences, Google Scholar, EBSCO, and Elsevier) for studies containing the term ‘city brand equity’. In addition, databases were searched for ‘destination brand equity’ and ‘place brand equity’ statements focusing on city brands. This SLR contains 36 empirical studies and does not include conference materials, and books. The analysis was based on three issues: general information (author/authors, year of publication, research tools, sample size, city and country as well as sample population), research specification (variables, hypotheses or research questions, statistical methods and research tools), and findings related to CBE and practical implications for destination marketing organizations, and destination or city managers. In summary, there are many factors determining CBE, including brand image, brand quality and brand awareness. These factors are related to cultural, environmental and ecological elements, as well as infrastructure and services offered to tourists. Brand assets related to the perception of the city brands in various aspects also proved to be important. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue City Branding and Sustainable Destination Management)
Back to TopTop