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Special Issue "Cities, Climate Change and Human Health in Asia"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Air, Climate Change and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 1245

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Scott Baum
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia, 4111
Interests: climate change; community resilience; social disadvantage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the United Nations, cities in Asian countries including India and China will account for the majority of the growth in the urban population over the next 30 years. While cities provide significant opportunity, they also tend to highlight vulnerabilities. Urban populations often have to deal with environmental hazards that potentially impact human health outcomes. These can include thermal stress caused by urban heat islands; morbidity associated with increased air pollution; direct and indirect health impacts of natural disasters such as floods, bushfires and extreme storms; increases in vector-borne diseases due to higher temperatures and changed habitats; and increases in water- or foodborne diseases due to poor sanitation. The theme of this proposed Special Issue of Sustainability is Asian cities, climate change, and human health. The focus will be on:

  • Developing an understanding of the nature of the climate change/human health challenge within Asian cities;
  • Understanding potential adaptation and mitigation measures;
  • Measuring vulnerability as a background to developing successful adaptation and mitigation measures; and
  • Analyzing vulnerable populations and understanding the uneven climate/health impacts on vulnerable populations.

It is widely known that while cities provide significant opportunity, they also tend to highlight vulnerabilities. Urban populations often have to deal with environmental hazards that potentially impact on human health outcomes. These can include thermal stress caused by urban heat islands, morbidity associated with increased air pollution, direct and indirect health impacts of natural disasters such as floods, bushfires and extreme storms, increases in vector bourne diseases due to higher temperatures and changed habitats and increases in water or food bourne diseases due to poor sanitation. While all cities are likely to face potential climate change impacts, it is those located in some of the fastest growing regions of the world that are perhaps most vulnerable. The IPCC notes that cities in Asia contain a significant proportion of the global urban exposure and vulnerability related to climate change hazards.

In this context, the theme of this proposed special edition of Sustainability is Asian Cities, Climate Change and Human Health.

Papers are invited that cover, but are not limited to, the main topics of:

  • Understanding of the nature of the climate change / human health challenge within Asian cities;
  • understanding potential adaptation and mitigation measures;
  • measuring vulnerability as a background to developing successful adaptaion and mitigation measures ; and
  • analysing vulnerably populations and understanding the uneven climate/ health imapcts on vulnerable populations

Prof. Dr. Scott Baum
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cities
  • climate change
  • human health
  • extreme weather events
  • urban heat island
  • vector-borne disease
  • waterborne disease
  • foodborne disease
  • mortality
  • morbidity
  • vulnerability

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Exploring the Impact of International Trade on Carbon Emissions: New Evidence from China’s 282 Cities
by and
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8968; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13168968 - 11 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1006
Abstract
Carbon emissions (CE) reduction has been an important measure to control global warming. With the deepening of internationalization, the import and export trade can have a significant influence on CE. In this study, the panel data of 282 cities in China from 2003 [...] Read more.
Carbon emissions (CE) reduction has been an important measure to control global warming. With the deepening of internationalization, the import and export trade can have a significant influence on CE. In this study, the panel data of 282 cities in China from 2003 to 2016 were employed, and linear regression analysis with fixed effects, feasible generalized least squares and Driscoll–Kraay estimators were performed to assess the separate impacts of import and export trade on CE. The results show that there is a positive correlation between imports and CE, while the relationship is contrary for exports. The panel threshold regression method was further used for regression, and it found that there was one threshold value for gross domestic product (GDP) and two threshold values for gross industrial output (GIO) in the model. According to the division of threshold value, the impact of import trade on CE will turn from positive to negative, while the impact of export trade on reducing CE will be further enhanced. The structure of China’s import and export trade are used to illustrate the underlying mechanism of the different effects. For controlling CE in international trade, China should import more high-tech products to upgrade high-emission industries, and reduce the proportion of labor-intensive products exported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities, Climate Change and Human Health in Asia)
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