Special Issue "Built Environment Education"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Carolyn S. Hayles
Website
Guest Editor
Cardiff School of Art and Design, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff CF5 2YB, UK
Interests: climate change adaptation and resilience; environmental design; low-zero carbon design; sustainable decision making
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recognition of the interconnectedness of buildings, people, and community is essential for the creation of a sustainable built environment. A number of factors have led to a focus on sustainable design and construction within the built environment. These include a greater awareness of and sensitivity towards the world’s limited natural resources (reducing environmental impacts), as well as a growing demand for healthier, more energy-efficient, and more environmentally responsible homes, schools, hospitals, work places, and leisure facilities (providing physiologically and psychologically healthier indoor environments).  In this special edition of Sustainability on ‘Built Environment Education’, we invite submissions from those working with the next generation of building professionals to share their experiences of embedding sustainability principles and education for sustainable decision-making in Built Environment Education programmes. Papers that explore approaches to teaching the interrelationship of the designed and constructed environment with human behaviour, human health and welfare, and environmental responsibilities are particularly welcomed.

Dr. Carolyn S Hayles
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Importance of Standardised Data-Collection Methods in the Improvement of Thermal Comfort Assessment Models for Developing Countries in the Tropics
Sustainability 2019, 11(15), 4180; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154180 - 02 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Thermal comfort in the built environment is one of the most defining parameters influencing energy use, environmental quality, and occupant satisfaction. Unfortunately, there is a lack of research in this area within developing countries, which are becoming increasingly urbanised and where mechanical air [...] Read more.
Thermal comfort in the built environment is one of the most defining parameters influencing energy use, environmental quality, and occupant satisfaction. Unfortunately, there is a lack of research in this area within developing countries, which are becoming increasingly urbanised and where mechanical air conditioning demands are rising. Many of these countries are adopting thermal comfort standards such as the ASHRAE Standard 55, the EN 15251, and the ISO 7730 to regulate the use of air-conditioning; even when these standards have been widely criticised for their inadequacy within geographical regions different to the ones that they were designed for. Research suggests the need to confirm these models through further post-occupancy studies and fieldwork. Deficiencies in data collection and methodologies are thought to require particular attention to develop algorithms that can predict thermal comfort levels accurately. Comprehensive strategies considering interrelated psychological, physiological and social factors are needed. This manuscript highlights gaps of research, specifically within tropical developing countries, through the analysis of Colombia as a case study. It emphasises the importance of standardised fieldwork data and gives examples of alternative collection systems. This aims to contribute to the understanding of occupant´s adaptive behaviours and their impact on the mitigation of climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Built Environment Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Role of Education in the Sustainable Regeneration of Built Heritage: A Case Study of Malta
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2563; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092563 - 03 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Vernacular architecture has great historical, cultural and architectonic value, but also much potential for reducing energy demand. However, the eco-refurbishment of heritage buildings within Mediterranean countries poses particular challenges. The research presented in this paper is part of a wider study aiming to [...] Read more.
Vernacular architecture has great historical, cultural and architectonic value, but also much potential for reducing energy demand. However, the eco-refurbishment of heritage buildings within Mediterranean countries poses particular challenges. The research presented in this paper is part of a wider study aiming to develop an effective framework for the sustainable regeneration of heritage buildings in Malta, using the 17th-century Presidential Palace of San Anton, Attard, as a case study. This paper focuses on the role of education in this field. Through qualitative research, including workshops with stakeholders, a stakeholders focus group and a public questionnaire, the awareness levels, educational background and attitudes of key stakeholders were analysed and assessed, as was the policy framework within which they operate. Interventions were found to be required at all levels. Increased awareness and education, a supportive policy framework, and a shift in the perceptions and attitudes of several key stakeholders were identified as crucial in ensuring that interventions on heritage buildings do not negatively affect their environmental performance, and/or impact their architectural and cultural value. This paper features recommendations outlining a supportive strategy for improving the knowledge base of stakeholders, including students, professionals, the public, policy-makers and operators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Built Environment Education)
Open AccessArticle
The Inclusion of a Sustainability Awareness Indicator in Assessment Tools for High School Buildings
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 387; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020387 - 14 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The growing debate about global environmental problems is evident in several spheres of society. The concern for the future of the planet is used as a political slogan, inspiring the creation of new laws and encouraging academic research that serves this purpose, as [...] Read more.
The growing debate about global environmental problems is evident in several spheres of society. The concern for the future of the planet is used as a political slogan, inspiring the creation of new laws and encouraging academic research that serves this purpose, as well as increasing the number of government agencies concerned with this matter. The 21st century is considered the “century of sustainable development”. Sustainability education in high schools has the potential to make the benefits of civil construction more visible to society and media by showing students, parents, and communities in general how sustainability in the built environment can improve their lives in economic, social, and environmental aspects. This study was applied in three high schools of Juiz de Fora (Brazil) and Guimarães (Portugal). These high schools have similar characteristics regarding teaching patterns and commitment to strengthening sustainability in their respective regions and reflect their socio-economic conditions, governmental strategies, everyday habits, and cultural attributes. The information was collected through questionnaires applied to high school students in 2017. This paper shows the need for including an indicator of sustainability awareness in sustainability assessment tools for high school buildings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Built Environment Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop