Special Issue "Approaches to Embedding Sustainability in Teacher Education"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tuula Keinonen
Website
Guest Editor
School of Applied Educational Science and Teacher Education, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 111, Joensuu 80101, Finland
Interests: Science Education, Societal Science Issues approaches, Career Aspiration in Science, Environmental Education, Teacher Education
Dr. Sirpa Kärkkäinen
Website
Guest Editor
School of Applied Educational Science and Teacher Education, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 111, Joensuu 80101, Finland
Interests: Science education, Health Education, Biology Education, Teacher Education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue, “Teaching Approaches to Embedding Sustainability in Teacher Education”, is to provide versatile experiences of how sustainability can be promoted in teacher education. UNESCO’s Educational Strategy (2014–2021) outlines the objective to empower learners to be responsible global citizens through, for example, strengthening education for sustainable development and the objective to shape the future education agenda by rethinking education for the future. UNESCO aims to reorient education so that it gives everyone the opportunity to acquire competence, and the knowledge, attitudes and values needed to contribute to sustainable development.

“Teaching Approaches to Embedding Sustainability in Teacher Education” focuses on the intersection between sustainability and teacher education in order to present the range of approaches currently being used to embed sustainability in teacher education across the globe. The SI will focus on sustainability in teacher education curricula, courses, learning environments, and practices to promote teachers’ and students’ understanding of sustainability. In addition, your contribution can present and reflect on the embedding of complex combinations of interdisciplinary knowledge, understanding, skills, values and dispositions into the teacher education, both pre- and in-service, and the rationales for doing so, the theoretical frameworks and pedagogical approaches they draw upon, and challenges faced in these endeavours.

References:

UNESCO. (2014). UNESCO Education Strategy 2014–2021. France: UNESCO

Evans, N., Stevenson, R.B., Lasen, M., & Ferreira, J.-A. (2017). Approaches to embedding sustainability in teacher education: A synthesis of the literature. Teaching and Teacher Education, 63, 405-417.

Lozano, R., Merrill, M.Y., Sammalisto, K., Ceulemans, K., & Lozano, F.J. (2017). Connecting Competences and Pedagogical Approaches for Sustainable Development in Higher Education: A Literature Review and Framework Proposal. Sustainability, 9, 1889; doi: 10.3390/su9101889.

Santone, S., Saunders, S., & Seguin, C. (2014). Essential Elements of Sustainability in Teacher Education. Journal of Sustainability Education, 6, May 2014.

Prof. Dr. Tuula Keinonen
Dr. Sirpa Kärkkäinen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • Education for Sustainability
  • Teacher Education
  • Teaching
  • Global Citizens

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Measuring Teachers’ Perceptions to Sustain STEM Education Development
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1531; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041531 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2041
Abstract
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development emphasized teachers as the cornerstone for the betterment of education. Teachers’ practices are strongly affected by teachers’ perceptions. The purpose of this study was to identify teachers’ perceptions to sustain STEM education development, regarding STEM education, STEM [...] Read more.
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development emphasized teachers as the cornerstone for the betterment of education. Teachers’ practices are strongly affected by teachers’ perceptions. The purpose of this study was to identify teachers’ perceptions to sustain STEM education development, regarding STEM education, STEM competencies, and difficulties in STEM implementation. We collected the data from 186 Vietnamese teachers, including STEM sub-field teachers and no STEM sub-field teachers. We used a survey method to capture teachers’ perceptions of STEM education. The one-way ANOVA was employed to examine the differences in teachers’ perceptions of STEM education in terms of the categorization of teaching experience, education background, and teaching subjects. The quantitative analysis showed that most Vietnamese teachers had positive views on STEM education. The higher educational background teachers and science teachers have the highest statistically significant scores in (1) STEM education, (2) STEM competencies, and (3) difficulties in implementation. The novice teachers have more positive views of STEM education, in terms of a better understanding of STEM education and assessing STEM competencies as being more valuable. There are no statistically significant differences in teachers’ difficulties among teaching experience groups. These results provide valuable information to design effective teacher professional development to sustain STEM education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Approaches to Embedding Sustainability in Teacher Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Relevance of Life-Cycle Assessment in Context-Based Science Education: A Case Study in Lower Secondary School
Sustainability 2019, 11(21), 5877; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11215877 - 23 Oct 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 689
Abstract
The article introduces a science education intervention using life-cycle analysis of consumer products. The intervention aims to promote lower secondary school students’ science career awareness and interest toward science studies. In this study, two lower secondary school teachers planned an intervention on life-cycle [...] Read more.
The article introduces a science education intervention using life-cycle analysis of consumer products. The intervention aims to promote lower secondary school students’ science career awareness and interest toward science studies. In this study, two lower secondary school teachers planned an intervention on life-cycle analysis, which aimed to be relevant for the students from an individual, societal, and vocational perspective. The study then examined how students perceived the relevance of the intervention, based on classroom observations, students’ life-cycle presentations, questionnaire responses, as well as interviews. The findings indicate that students found life-cycle assessment to be a relevant topic both from an individual and societal perspective. However, findings on vocational relevance were two-fold, as students gained knowledge on different occupations, but this did not seem to directly affect their future career aspirations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Approaches to Embedding Sustainability in Teacher Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Nordic Student Teachers’ Views on the Most Efficient Teaching and Learning Methods for Species and Species Identification
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5231; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195231 - 24 Sep 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 952
Abstract
Teachers need knowledge of species and species identification skills for teaching the structure and function of ecosystems, and the principles of biodiversity and its role in sustainability. The aim of this study is to analyze Nordic student teachers’ views on the most efficient [...] Read more.
Teachers need knowledge of species and species identification skills for teaching the structure and function of ecosystems, and the principles of biodiversity and its role in sustainability. The aim of this study is to analyze Nordic student teachers’ views on the most efficient methods and strategies to teach and learn species and species identification, and to find some trends about how well their views are reflected in a species identification test. Student teachers in Finland, Norway, and Sweden (N = 426) answered a questionnaire consisting of fixed and open-ended questions, and a species identification test. An analysis of variance, Chi-Square, and t-test were used for quantitative data and an inductive content analysis for qualitative data. Results showed that outdoor teaching and learning methods are more efficient than indoor methods. The majority of student teachers considered outdoor experiential learning with living organisms as the most efficient teaching and learning method. Student teachers who highlighted outdoor experiential learning and outdoor project work as their most efficient methods received significantly better results in the species identification test than the others. Field trips and fieldwork were emphasized as the most important sources in schools and universities, while the Internet was the most important source among media. The student teachers underlined teachers’ expertise in the form of in-depth understanding of subjects and supervising skills for efficient teaching both outdoors and indoors. Therefore, teaching and learning of species and species identification as the practical part of biodiversity and sustainability education is emphasized as an integral part of teacher education programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Approaches to Embedding Sustainability in Teacher Education)
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