E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "7th World Sustainability Forum—Selected Papers"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Marc A. Rosen

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainability; sustainable development; energy; efficiency; environmental impact; economics; ecology; sustainable engineering and design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The adoption of the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in September 2015 was accompanied by what insiders considered an optimism they have not experienced in relation to UN resolutions before. The relative efficiency in the drafting, the absence of trenches between East and West, or between North and South, and the unanimity of support of the 193 countries spoke volumes. In stark contrast, sustainability and dealing with it could be the poster child for what Robert Horn called a social mess (2007: 6): “a set of interrelated problems… resistant to analysis and, more importantly, to resolution.” The characteristics of a social mess generally, and of sustainability specifically, include an absence of a unique and correct solution, the interrelatedness of problems, ideological constraints, multiple possible intervention points, resistance to change, value conflict, and political and economic constraints. While these are excellent ingredients for a thorough academic debate, the issues underpinning the sustainability debate are so urgent that, beyond academic reflection, much more is necessary than what academics, political leaders, administrators, industry, nations, communities, and individuals are habitually prepared to do.

As part of the output of this conference, we plan to publish a Special Issue of Sustainability, on this thematic area. We are looking forward to receiving your submission to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Marc A. Rosen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Which Corporate Governance Mechanisms Drive CSR Disclosure Practices in Emerging Countries?
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010061
Received: 18 November 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 22 December 2018
PDF Full-text (524 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although several studies have analyzed the role that specific corporate governance mechanisms have on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) reporting practices, their findings have not been conclusive and the evidence from developing countries is scarce. The theoretical support for this relationship in the previous [...] Read more.
Although several studies have analyzed the role that specific corporate governance mechanisms have on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) reporting practices, their findings have not been conclusive and the evidence from developing countries is scarce. The theoretical support for this relationship in the previous literature is found in Stakeholder, Agency, Legitimacy, and Good Management theories. Undoubtedly, as the institutional environment has an important impact on CSR reporting practices, it would be relevant for this field of research to analyze this relationship in companies from emerging countries. It is suggested for the sake of convenience to consider different levels of corporate governance mechanisms together due to the high interdependence among them. Consequently, the aim of this paper is to analyze whether different levels of corporate governance mechanisms (at the institutional, group, and firm level) are determinant factors of the CSR reporting practices in BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). The final sample was composed of 281 companies. On the basis of our results, we conclude that institutional corporate governance mechanisms influence the company’s CSR reporting strategy and that both CSR disclosure practices analyzed are affected by group-level corporate governance mechanisms in companies from family-based societies. Our findings support the appropriateness of separately analyzing this issue in emerging countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 7th World Sustainability Forum—Selected Papers)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Consumer Attitude and Behavioral Intention toward Collaborative Consumption of Shared Services
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4468; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124468
Received: 1 November 2018 / Revised: 16 November 2018 / Accepted: 23 November 2018 / Published: 28 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (614 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The emerging market model of collaborative consumption, where underused resources can be collaboratively shared between consumers, is proving to be an increasingly profitable commercial business concept encouraging traditional non-sharing firms to seek models of shared access for their consumers. In terms of consumption [...] Read more.
The emerging market model of collaborative consumption, where underused resources can be collaboratively shared between consumers, is proving to be an increasingly profitable commercial business concept encouraging traditional non-sharing firms to seek models of shared access for their consumers. In terms of consumption reduction, however, the concept has seen slower uptake among consumers. For example, despite the promotion of car sharing and public transportation solutions, cities around the world report increasing car use and an increasing concentration of businesses in urban areas demanding parking spaces. Where it is known that private vehicle use in urban centers persists, this study explores consumer attitude and behavioral intention toward collaborative consumption of shared services, in the context of personal transport and the built, inner-city environment. The study reports survey data gathered from self-driving employees of businesses located in congested urban areas. Six motivational determinants of collaborative consumption and how they influence attitude and intention toward two different shared parking scenarios were explored using regression analysis. In this study, shared carparks are treated as an incremental step toward shifting more stubborn user perceptions of access over ownership in urban transport, as well as a solution to one aspect of the problems associated with increased urban density and underused land resources. Overall, the study finds a strong relationship between perceptions of ownership and risk reduction, with access models that protect a “primary” user, and allow for user flexibility, preferred by respondents. This offers clear guidelines for the development of successful shared space options in the parking context but can also be extended to other sharing service solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 7th World Sustainability Forum—Selected Papers)
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top