Motor Competence in a Life Span Perspective

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 21749

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
Interests: learning; skill development; passion; grit; mindset
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Guest Editor
Department of Teacher Education, Faculty of Sosial and Educational Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway
Interests: physical activity; motor competence; children; adolescents and older adults; assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Motor competence is a fundamental component in the human life span, as the execution of precise, coordinated, and adapted movements is a prerequisite for a highly functional lifestyle. Motor competence is of importance for participation in physical activity and plays an important part in physical fitness and physical activity outcomes during childhood and adolescence. In young children and infants, new motor skills create new opportunities for exploration and learning that initiate cascades of development across diverse psychological domains. In fact, research indicates that motor experiences and their associated sensorimotor consequences may help to enhance cognition during the whole life span, including among the elderly. What kind of role motor competence plays in enhancing health aspects and cognitive functions across the life span needs to be further explored. Therefore, this Special Issue seeks to highlight the important role of motor competence for physical activity behavior, health, and cognitive functions through the lifespan.

Prof. Dr. Hermundur Sigmundsson
Prof. Dr. Monika Haga
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • motor competence
  • functional movement
  • specificity of skill learning
  • life span motor development
  • cognitive functions
  • skill proficiency
  • physical activity

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 255 KiB  
Article
Associations between Motor Competence, Physical Self-Perception and Autonomous Motivation for Physical Activity in Children
by Ole Kristian Ensrud-Skraastad and Monika Haga
Sports 2020, 8(9), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8090120 - 1 Sep 2020
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3596
Abstract
Research indicates that children and adolescents gradually participate less in physical activity with age. Several factors are associated with children’s physical activity levels, such as motor performance, self-perception of athletic competence and motivation to physical activity. To gain a better understanding of the [...] Read more.
Research indicates that children and adolescents gradually participate less in physical activity with age. Several factors are associated with children’s physical activity levels, such as motor performance, self-perception of athletic competence and motivation to physical activity. To gain a better understanding of the factors of importance for behavior related to an active lifestyle, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between motor competence, physical self-perception and autonomous motivation and to examine to what extent this association may vary by sex. The sample consisted of 101 children, whose average age was 11.7 years (SD = 0.57), 53 boys and 48 girls. All subjects were measured on motor competence, physical self-perception and autonomous motivation for physical activity. The results indicate a low positive relationship between motor competence and physical self-perception for the entire sample and among girls. There is also a significant correlation between autonomous motivation and physical self-perception. No significant correlations were found between autonomous motivation and motor competence. The association between physical self-perception and autonomous motivation suggests that psychological factors play an important role in children’s participation in physical activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Motor Competence in a Life Span Perspective)
14 pages, 1365 KiB  
Article
The Effectiveness of a Primary School Based Badminton Intervention on Children’s Fundamental Movement Skills
by Michael J. Duncan, Mark Noon, Chelsey Lawson, Josh Hurst and Emma L. J. Eyre
Sports 2020, 8(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020011 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 6659
Abstract
This study examined the effects of the Badminton World Federation (BWF) Shuttle Time program on fundamental movement skills (FMS) in English children. A total of 124 children; 66 in key stage 1 (ages 6–7 years) and 58 in key stage 2 (10–11 years) [...] Read more.
This study examined the effects of the Badminton World Federation (BWF) Shuttle Time program on fundamental movement skills (FMS) in English children. A total of 124 children; 66 in key stage 1 (ages 6–7 years) and 58 in key stage 2 (10–11 years) undertook the Shuttle Time program, once weekly for six weeks (n = 63) or acted as controls (n = 61). Pre, post and ten-weeks post, both process and product FMS were determined. Children in the intervention group, aged 6–7 years, had higher total process FMS (via test of gross motor development-2) compared to the control group at post and ten-weeks post intervention (both p = 0.0001, d = 0.6 and 0.7, respectively). There were no significant differences in process FMS scores for children aged 10–11 years. Ten-meter sprint speed decreased pre to post and was maintained at ten-weeks post for the intervention groups aged 6–7 years (p = 0.0001, d = 0.6) and 10–11 years (p = 0.001, d = 0.2) compared to control. Standing long jump distance increased pre to post (p = 0.0001, d = 0.8) and was maintained at ten-weeks post (p = 0.0001, d = 0.5) for the intervention group. Medicine ball throw performance increased pre to post (p = 0.0001, d = 0.3) for the intervention group. The BWF Shuttle Time program is beneficial in developing FMS for key stage 1 children (ages 6–7). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Motor Competence in a Life Span Perspective)
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11 pages, 234 KiB  
Article
Motor Competence in Adolescents: Exploring Association with Physical Fitness
by Thórdís Gísladóttir, Monika Haga and Hermundur Sigmundsson
Sports 2019, 7(7), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7070176 - 20 Jul 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4246
Abstract
The purpose of this study was twofold: First, to examine the correlation between adolescents’ performance on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children -2 (MABC-2) and the Test of Motor Competence (TMC), and second, to interpret the correlation between performance on physical fitness measures [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was twofold: First, to examine the correlation between adolescents’ performance on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children -2 (MABC-2) and the Test of Motor Competence (TMC), and second, to interpret the correlation between performance on physical fitness measures and motor competence. This study had a cross-sectional design, in which 101 adolescents age 15–16 years were recruited. The participants were assessed with the MABC-2 (eight tasks), the TMC (four tasks) and physical fitness measures (four tasks). Ninety-four participants completed all the test items (51% male). The correlation between the standard score of the MABC-2 and TMC total score was found to be moderate (r = −0.418). A weak correlation was found between MABC-2 and total score of physical fitness (r = 0.278), while the correlation between TMC and physical fitness was a little stronger (r = 0.361). However, when removing one measure from the TMC (the walking/running in slopes), the correlation was weak and not significant (r = 0.109). The results suggest that different test batteries can cause discrepancy in the results regarding correlation between motor competence and physical fitness in adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Motor Competence in a Life Span Perspective)

Review

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14 pages, 760 KiB  
Review
The Effects of Physical Education on Motor Competence in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Håvard Lorås
Sports 2020, 8(6), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8060088 - 15 Jun 2020
Cited by 40 | Viewed by 6798
Abstract
Appropriate levels of motor competence are an integrated part of individuals’ health-related fitness, and physical education is proposed as an important context for developing a broad range of motor skills. The aim of the current study was to apply meta-analyses to assess the [...] Read more.
Appropriate levels of motor competence are an integrated part of individuals’ health-related fitness, and physical education is proposed as an important context for developing a broad range of motor skills. The aim of the current study was to apply meta-analyses to assess the effectiveness of curriculum-based physical education on the development of the overall motor competence of children and adolescents. Studies were located by searching seven databases and included according to predefined criteria. Random effects models using the standardized effect size (Hedges’ g) were used to aggregate results, including an examination of heterogeneity and inconsistency. The meta-analysis included 20 studies, and a total of 38 effect sizes were calculated. A statistically significant improvement in motor competence following curriculum-based physical education compared to active control groups was observed in children and adolescents (g = −0.69, 95% CI −0.91 to −0.46, n = 23). Participants’ ages, total time for physical education intervention, and type of motor competence assessment did not appear to be statistically significant moderators of effect size. Physical education with various curricula can, therefore, increase overall motor competence in children and adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Motor Competence in a Life Span Perspective)
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