Special Issue "Violence, Victimization and Prevention"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760). This special issue belongs to the section "Social Policy and Welfare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Sónia Maria Martins Caridade
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. School of Psychology, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2. Interdisciplinary Center for Gender Studies (CIEG) of the Higher Institute of Social and Political Sciences of the University of Lisbon (ISCSP-UL), 1300-663 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: domestic violence; dating violence; victims of polivictimization; youth and delinquency; gender-based violence
Prof. Maria Alzira Pimenta Dinis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UFP Energy, Environment and Health Research Unit (FP-ENAS), University Fernando Pessoa (UFP), 4249-004 Porto, Portugal
Interests: violence and victimization; social sciences; global health; environment and human health; environmental science; sustainability; information and communication technologies (ITCs); statistics and probability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to address violence as a serious public health problem (Rossi and Talevi, 2017) that entails several new forms of victimization stimulated by contemporary societies. Violence and victimization cross different cultures and different systems (e.g., individual, family, school, social) and subsystems (e.g., marital, parental, peers, dating), impacting different areas, such as health (physical and mental), criminal justice, and social wellbeing, and may undermine social development (WHO, 2014; Seth and Peshevska, 2014). Experiencing violence is a major risk factor for the development of lifelong health and social problems (Rossi and Talevi, 2017). Violence is a complex, multifaceted, and multidetermined phenomenon (Dahlberg and Krug, 2006) that on a daily basis victimizes the lives of many children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly, requiring continuous effort to achieve an adequate understanding of how it is carried out and how to minimize it and prevent it (Hamby, 2017). The articles in this Special Edition should address the different types of violence and new forms of victimization present in the various systems and subsystems above identified, as well as the prevention practices developed to mitigate their impact and implications in individual and social terms. Papers related with practical implications for clinical and institutional support to victims of violence are also welcome. Submitted papers should be based on rigorous, high-quality quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods research, intersectional and comparative analyses, contributing to new insights and developments into the topics addressed. Papers based on research with under-represented, minoritized or marginalized groups, or specific social contexts are particularly encouraged.

References

Dahlberg, L., & Krug, E. (2006). Violence a global public health problem. Ciência & Saúde Coletiva, 11(2), 277-292.https://doi.org/10.1590/s1413-81232006000200007 

Hamby, S. (2017). On defining violence, and why it matters. Psychology of Violence, 7(2), 167-180. http://doi.org/10.1037/vio0000117

Rossi, A., & Talevi, D. (2017). Interpersonal violence and mental illness. Journal of Psychopathology, 23, 49-51.

Seth, D., & Peshevska, D. J. (2014). Preventing interpersonal violence in Europe. Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, 2(2), 350-352. https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2014.060

World Health Organization (WHO). (2014). Global status report on violence prevention. World Health Organization.

Other important references

Ameral, V., Palm Reed, K. M., & Hines, D. A. (2017). An analysis of help-seeking patterns among college students victims of sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1-25. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260517721169

Caridade, S. (2019). Dating violence in schools: Preventing and responding through the perspective of educational professionals. In W. Spencer (Ed.), Dating Violence: Prevalence, Risk Factors and Perspectives (pp. 25-40). New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

Caridade, S., Braga, T., & Borrajo, E. (2019). Cyber dating abuse: Evidence from a systematic review. Journal of Aggression and Violent Behavior, 48, 152-168. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2019.08.018

Caridade, S., Pinheiro, I., & Dinis, A. (2019). Disclosure in victims of dating violence: Strategies and reasons for help-seeking. In W. Spencer (Ed.), Dating violence: Prevalence, risk Factors and perspectives (pp. 85-106). New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

Chu, D. C., & Sun, I. Y. (2014). Reactive versus proactive attitudes toward domestic violence: A comparison of Taiwanese male and female police officers. Crime and Delinquency, 60(2), 216-237. http://doi.org/10.1177/0011128710372192  

De La Rue, L., Polanin, J., Espelage, D., & Pigott, T. (2017). A meta-analysis of school-based interventions aimed to prevent or reduce violence in teen dating relationships. Review of Educational Research, 87(1), 7-34. http://doi.org/10.3102/0034654316632061   

Delara, M. (2016). Mental health consequences and risk factors of physical intimate partner violence. Mental Health in Family Medicine, 12, 119-125. Retrieved from http://www.mhfmjournal.com/pdf/mental-health-consequences-and-risk-factors-of-physical-intimate-partner-violence.pdf  

Hagemann-White, C. (2017). Responses to domestic violence in Germany in a European context. In E. S. Buzawa & C. G. Buzawa (Eds.), Global responses to domestic violence (pp. 87-105). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56721-1_5  

Khubchandani, J., Clark, J., Wiblishause, M. et al. (2017). Preventing and responding to teen dating violence: A national study of school principals' perspectives and practices. Violence and Gender, 4(4), 144-151.  https://doi.org/10.1089/vio.2017.0043

Lamoreaux, D., & Sulkowski, M. L. (2019). An alternative to fortified schools: Using crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) to balance student safety and psychological well‐being. Psychology in the Schools, 1-14. http://doi.org/10.1002/pits.22301  

Palermo, T., Bleck, J., & Peterman, A. (2013). Tip of the iceberg: Reporting and gender-based violence in developing countries. American Journal of Epidemiology, 179(5), 602-612. http://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwt295 

Park, S., & Kim, S. (2018). The power of family and community factors in predicting dating violence: A meta-analysis. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 40, 19-28.  http://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2018.03.002  

Santos, A. & Caridade. S. (2017). Violence in intimate relationship between same- sex partners: prevalence study. Trends in Psychology, 25(3), 1357-1371.  http://doi.org/10.9788/tp2017.3-19pt

Sigurdsson, E. L. (2019). Domestic violence-are we up to the task? Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, Online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/02813432.2019.1608638

Smith, K., Cénat, J. M., Lapierre, L., Dion, J., & Hébert, M. (2018). Cyber dating violence: Prevalence and correlates among high school students from small urban areas in Quebec. Journal of Affective Disorders, 234, 220–223. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.02.043

Prof. Sónia Maria Martins Caridade
Prof. Maria Alzira Pimenta Dinis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Dating violence
  • Domestic violence
  • Early prevention
  • Elderly abuse
  • Exposure to interparental violence
  • Family violence
  • Gender-based violence
  • Interpersonal violence
  • Intimate partner violence (IPV)
  • Marital violence
  • Multicultural intervention
  • Multiple victimization
  • Polyvictimization
  • Primary prevention
  • Psychoeducational intervention
  • School violence
  • Secondary prevention
  • Secondary victimization
  • Singular victimization
  • Tertiary prevention
  • Violence and information and communication technologies (ICT’s)
  • Violence awareness
  • Violence prevention practices
  • Youth violence

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Sexual Assault Myths Acceptance in University Campus: Construction and Validation of a Scale
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(12), 462; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10120462 - 03 Dec 2021
Viewed by 254
Abstract
The study related to the myths of rape has been carried out since the 1980s at different scales. However, the interaction between the acceptance of these rape myths (myths related to sexual abuse) and the nightlife scene—where alcohol consumption becomes the epicenter of [...] Read more.
The study related to the myths of rape has been carried out since the 1980s at different scales. However, the interaction between the acceptance of these rape myths (myths related to sexual abuse) and the nightlife scene—where alcohol consumption becomes the epicenter of this particular context—has not been specifically evaluated. In this work, a questionnaire has been developed considering different scales. It has been tested online in a population of 367 first-year undergraduate students at the University of Alcalá (Spain). The results of the exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, as well as the reliability ones, indicate the adequacy of the scale construction and validation process for the university student population. In addition, the results obtained, in line with the specialized literature, indicate that the consumption of alcohol and other drugs appear as justifying elements of sexual violence, exonerating the aggressors and perpetrating the victim. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence, Victimization and Prevention)
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Article
Psychological and Gender Differences in a Simulated Cheating Coercion Situation at School
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(7), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10070265 - 09 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1461
Abstract
This study aimed to analyze gender, anxiety, and psychological inflexibility differences of high school students’ behaviors in a simulated situation of peer coercion into academic cheating. Method: A total of 1147 volunteer adolescents participated, (Men: N = 479; Mage = 16.3; Women: N [...] Read more.
This study aimed to analyze gender, anxiety, and psychological inflexibility differences of high school students’ behaviors in a simulated situation of peer coercion into academic cheating. Method: A total of 1147 volunteer adolescents participated, (Men: N = 479; Mage = 16.3; Women: N = 668; Mage = 16.2). The participants saw 15 s animated online video presenting peer coercion into an academic cheating situation, including a questionnaire about their reactions to face the situation. They also answered the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory for children and adolescents and the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y). Gender was associated with the behaviors facing the situation. Higher state anxiety and inflexibility were present in those participants that avoided aggressive behaviors facing the situation; on the other hand, trait anxiety was present in those who reacted aggressively. Finally, higher anxiety and inflexibility were associated with the used moral disengagement mechanisms, but also with peers’ perception as sanctioning or being against the participants’ decision. The most aggressive students were more flexible and less stressed than those who tried to solve assertively. Expectations about peers seem to be relevant to the decision-making facing moral dilemmas and peer victimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence, Victimization and Prevention)
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Article
Strategies for Territorial Peace: The Overcoming of the Structural Violence in Women Living in Palmira, Colombia
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(11), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9110211 - 18 Nov 2020
Viewed by 1444
Abstract
Women experience different types of violence, and poverty is one of them. The aim of this work was to show the situation of poverty experienced by women in Palmira and how this condition affects both their participation in and contribution to the achievement [...] Read more.
Women experience different types of violence, and poverty is one of them. The aim of this work was to show the situation of poverty experienced by women in Palmira and how this condition affects both their participation in and contribution to the achievement of territorial peace—a central political target in our country. For this, a descriptive and predictive study was carried out by applying a survey to measure the different types of violence affecting Palmirana women. The results demonstrate the predominance of structural violence suffered by women, which creates unfavorable conditions for the construction of peace in Colombia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence, Victimization and Prevention)

Review

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Review
Dating Violence: A Bibliometric Review of the Literature in Web of Science and Scopus
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(11), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10110445 - 22 Nov 2021
Viewed by 519
Abstract
This study has the general purpose of improving the understanding and description of the field of violence in young couple relationships by means of a bibliometric analysis. A descriptive and transversal-retrospective methodology is used, the objective of which is to describe in a [...] Read more.
This study has the general purpose of improving the understanding and description of the field of violence in young couple relationships by means of a bibliometric analysis. A descriptive and transversal-retrospective methodology is used, the objective of which is to describe in a quantitative way the information obtained from the production of 842 references registered in the Scopus and Web of Science databases. The results show that during 2017 and 2018, the majority of publications were concentrated, highlighting that the United States is the country with the highest amount of scientific production on violence in intimate relationships. It is important to highlight that more and more countries are investigating this subject, highlighting an increase in production from 2015 onwards. The violence that occurs in the relationships of young couples is a global social and health problem that requires research to be able to deepen its knowledge and in the prevention of this social scourge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence, Victimization and Prevention)
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