Next Article in Journal
Social Security Enrollment as an Indicator of State Fragility and Legitimacy: A Field Experiment in Maghreb Countries
Next Article in Special Issue
Dating Violence: A Bibliometric Review of the Literature in Web of Science and Scopus
Previous Article in Journal
From the Inquisition Pyre to Insertion into the Church: The Familial and Social Trajectory of Hernando Ortiz, a Jewish Convert in the Spanish Empire in the 16th Century
Previous Article in Special Issue
Strategies for Territorial Peace: The Overcoming of the Structural Violence in Women Living in Palmira, Colombia
Article

Psychological and Gender Differences in a Simulated Cheating Coercion Situation at School

1
Department of Social Science, Universidad de la Costa, Barranquilla 080001, Colombia
2
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Universidad Europea de Madrid, 28670 Villaviciosa de Odón, Spain
3
Grupo de Investigación en Cultura, Educación y Sociedad, Universidad de la Costa, Barranquilla 080001, Colombia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sandra Walklate
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(7), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10070265
Received: 18 May 2021 / Revised: 28 June 2021 / Accepted: 7 July 2021 / Published: 9 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Violence, Victimization and Prevention)
This study aimed to analyze gender, anxiety, and psychological inflexibility differences of high school students’ behaviors in a simulated situation of peer coercion into academic cheating. Method: A total of 1147 volunteer adolescents participated, (Men: N = 479; Mage = 16.3; Women: N = 668; Mage = 16.2). The participants saw 15 s animated online video presenting peer coercion into an academic cheating situation, including a questionnaire about their reactions to face the situation. They also answered the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory for children and adolescents and the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y). Gender was associated with the behaviors facing the situation. Higher state anxiety and inflexibility were present in those participants that avoided aggressive behaviors facing the situation; on the other hand, trait anxiety was present in those who reacted aggressively. Finally, higher anxiety and inflexibility were associated with the used moral disengagement mechanisms, but also with peers’ perception as sanctioning or being against the participants’ decision. The most aggressive students were more flexible and less stressed than those who tried to solve assertively. Expectations about peers seem to be relevant to the decision-making facing moral dilemmas and peer victimization. View Full-Text
Keywords: peer victimization; moral disengagement; bullying; disruptive behavior peer victimization; moral disengagement; bullying; disruptive behavior
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Martínez-González, M.B.; Arenas-Rivera, C.P.; Cardozo-Rusinque, A.A.; Morales-Cuadro, A.R.; Acuña-Rodríguez, M.; Turizo-Palencia, Y.; Clemente-Suárez, V.J. Psychological and Gender Differences in a Simulated Cheating Coercion Situation at School. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 265. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10070265

AMA Style

Martínez-González MB, Arenas-Rivera CP, Cardozo-Rusinque AA, Morales-Cuadro AR, Acuña-Rodríguez M, Turizo-Palencia Y, Clemente-Suárez VJ. Psychological and Gender Differences in a Simulated Cheating Coercion Situation at School. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(7):265. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10070265

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martínez-González, Marina B., Claudia P. Arenas-Rivera, Aura A. Cardozo-Rusinque, Aldair R. Morales-Cuadro, Mónica Acuña-Rodríguez, Yamile Turizo-Palencia, and Vicente J. Clemente-Suárez 2021. "Psychological and Gender Differences in a Simulated Cheating Coercion Situation at School" Social Sciences 10, no. 7: 265. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10070265

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop