Special Issue "Training Models and Practices in Sociology"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Sandro Serpa

Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of the Azores, Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences—CICS.UAc/CICS.NOVA.UAc, and Interdisciplinary Centre for Childhood and Adolescence—NICA—UAc, 9501-801 Ponta Delgada, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sociology of education; sociology of organizations; teaching sociology; sociology of sustainable tourism
Guest Editor
Dr. Carlos Miguel Ferreira

1 Department of Estoril Higher, Institute for Tourism and Hotel Studies, Estoril, Portugal
2 Polytechnic Institute of Castelo Branco, and Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences – CICS.NOVA, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sociology of science; sociology of health; teaching sociology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue of the journal is to reflect on Sociology training processes, and their impact focuses on how to teach Sociology (either as introduction or general, or in its specialties).

Sociology is recognised, to a greater or lesser extent, as a scientific discipline that envisages specifically the social reality producing plural theoretical topics, formulating research problems within the context of these topics and building sets of principles, theories, methodical strategies and key results that function as models or guidance for research. In the models and practices of training in sociology, several elements are relevant and can be analysed, particularly the structure of study programmes and curricular units, the syllabuses of the curricular units, the teachers’ qualifications and competences, and the teaching/learning activities developed.

This Special Issue of Societies aims to invite the submission of original manuscripts (whether in the form of original research, systematic reviews, theoretical papers or even grounded personal comments) whatever the methodology used, so that this teaching is successful, in what it is a permanent challenge. To this end, the topics to be addressed, while not being limited to them, may focus, among other topics, on Sociology teaching practices at different educational levels, the specific contribution of the learning of Sociology for a sounder support in training in Sociology, and also in other scientific areas, and the legitimacy and prestige/representations of Sociology (or their lack thereof) in academia.

Dr. Sandro Serpa
Dr. Carlos Miguel Ferreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

 

  • teaching sociology
  • sociology in higher education
  • sociology in education
  • sociologist
  • training sociology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Training Models and Practices in Sociology
Societies 2018, 8(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8030056
Received: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Models and Practices in Sociology)

Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Scaffolding Rubrics to Improve Student Writing: Preliminary Results of Using Rubrics in a Sociology Program to Enhance Learning and Mechanical Writing Skills
Societies 2018, 8(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8020034
Received: 22 April 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 25 May 2018 / Published: 27 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (193 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the era of accreditation, academic accountability and transparency within curriculum is becoming a desired standard within and across disciplines. Through the use of course learning outcomes, program outcomes can be strengthened. Scaffolding within curricula can benefit both accountability and assessment goals. Through
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In the era of accreditation, academic accountability and transparency within curriculum is becoming a desired standard within and across disciplines. Through the use of course learning outcomes, program outcomes can be strengthened. Scaffolding within curricula can benefit both accountability and assessment goals. Through the use of Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy, scaffolding within the course can be used to aid in the accomplishment of the course learning outcomes. Scaffolding within the course curriculum can move students through Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy levels toward the mastery of specific skills. Writing is a major area of assessment as an indication of learning across disciplines. Scaffolding rubrics were used within sociology courses to specifically address both student learning and mechanical writing skills. Preliminary results of using rubrics to enhance student learning and scaffolding in eight courses (one 100-level, one 200-level, two 300-level, and four 400-level sociology courses) will be presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Models and Practices in Sociology)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Learning Outcomes in an Introductory Sociology Course: The Role of Learning Approach, Socio-Demographic Characteristics, Group and Teacher Effects
Societies 2018, 8(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8010004
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 5 January 2018 / Accepted: 7 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1000 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The article discusses a study on learning outcomes in an introductory Sociology course in a higher education setting. A quantitative model similar to education production functions is hypothesized. Independent variables include socio-demographic and psychological ones, as well as others pertaining to the learning
[...] Read more.
The article discusses a study on learning outcomes in an introductory Sociology course in a higher education setting. A quantitative model similar to education production functions is hypothesized. Independent variables include socio-demographic and psychological ones, as well as others pertaining to the learning environment. Learning is measured with the binary categories of “deep” and “surface” outcomes, which are qualitatively different, and are based on the comparison of mind maps drawn by students at the beginning and end of their first semester. Questionnaire data was collected from 264 first-year students of a Social Science Faculty. Significant effects on learning outcome are found for family background, major area of study, and teacher’s gender. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Models and Practices in Sociology)
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Other

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Open AccessEssay Sociology’s Role in the Teaching of Organizational Behavior in Higher Education. The Case of Hospitality Management
Societies 2018, 8(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8030051
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 6 July 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 13 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (262 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Teaching in universities, especially in management schools, is today orientated to solving-problems and operational skills’ development, short-term productivity gains and to a vocational perspective. This represents an impoverishment of a deeper learning, an obstacle to the development of competences in a broader and
[...] Read more.
Teaching in universities, especially in management schools, is today orientated to solving-problems and operational skills’ development, short-term productivity gains and to a vocational perspective. This represents an impoverishment of a deeper learning, an obstacle to the development of competences in a broader and integrative sense and the absence of a critical thinking practice. These are important tools to enhance in students and future managers, as specific social actors, abilities to act in a conscious, autonomous and long-term efficacious manner in society. This essay’s objective is to problematize the role that sociology could assume in the overcoming of that impoverishment, namely within the curricular unit of organizational behavior in two ways. First, teaching the social and macro dimensions that contribute to explain organizational structuring and behavior. Secondly, enhancing reflexivity and contextualization on the practices and discourses of all social actors involved and disassembling the dominant ideological, naturalized and simplistic individualized view on the reality of labor, employment and organizations. This is especially relevant in hospitality management studies because the dominant discourse about hospitality organizations hide, under a hegemonic paradigm of naturalized and individualized explanations, the macro-social dimensions of its organizational culture, work conditions, employees’ behaviors, management styles and market labor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Models and Practices in Sociology)
Open AccessEssay Challenges in the Teaching of Sociology in Higher Education. Contributions to a Discussion
Societies 2017, 7(4), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc7040030
Received: 29 July 2017 / Revised: 22 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 October 2017 / Published: 31 October 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
At a time when Sociology (either in its introductory or general dimension or in the form of specialised Sociologies) is acknowledged as a scientific discipline with important contributions in training at the higher education level, and not only for the future sociologist, there
[...] Read more.
At a time when Sociology (either in its introductory or general dimension or in the form of specialised Sociologies) is acknowledged as a scientific discipline with important contributions in training at the higher education level, and not only for the future sociologist, there is a need to (re)think the problem of teaching Sociology in this context. This article seeks to contribute to this discussion on the teaching of Sociology in higher education, being a grounded reflection that is based on the authors’ teaching experience in the Portuguese context. Sociology has specificities, which we put forward through four framing principles, namely the need to permanently mobilise sociological imagination, be multi-paradigmatic, the need to be receptive to a heuristic interdisciplinarity, and, finally, foster reflexivity at several levels. These principles should, from our standpoint, shape the teaching of Sociology, both delimiting what should be taught and fostering the way to teach while abiding by these principles. As a conclusion, this problem of teaching Sociology needs an in-depth investigation, in the search for a growing pedagogical quality in a context of increasing opportunities to reform the type of teaching provided in higher education, which is a permanent challenge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Models and Practices in Sociology)
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