Topic Editors

Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of the Azores, 9500-321 Ponta Delgada, Portugal
CIPES – Centre for Research in Higher Education Policies, 4450-227 Matosinhos, Portugal

Embedding Sustainability in Organizations through Climate, Culture and Leadership

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 March 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
31 May 2024
Viewed by
15415

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability is unavoidable and is present in the various dimensions of social life, that is, at the macro-, meso- and micro-social levels. The development of sustainability in organizations, whatever type they are, has become increasingly paramount for their survival and growing success, whether they are for-profit organizations or not, whether their action focuses on the provision of goods or services. This wide range includes educational institutions, and higher education institutions in particular, which play a pivotal role in promoting and developing sustainable awareness and behavior in their actors. However, the development of sustainability proves to be a complex process, in an increasingly digital future. It is this context that shapes this topic, which seeks to contribute, through the publication of high-quality and relevant manuscripts that use different theoretical, conceptual and methodological approaches, to a better understanding and implementation of climate (perception of the environment in the organization), culture (the shared way of being, thinking and acting in a coordinated people with reciprocal expectations), and/or leadership (management of organizations), whether in dialogue with each other or not, as instruments that can be mobilized for embedding sustainability in any type of organization.

Dr. Sandro Serpa
Dr. Maria José Sá
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • digitalization in/of organizations
  • human resources
  • leadership practices
  • organizational climate
  • organizational culture
  • organizational identity
  • sustainable management
  • sustainable organizations
  • sustainability in organizations

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Administrative Sciences
admsci
3.0 3.9 2011 20.6 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Education Sciences
education
3.0 4.0 2011 24.9 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Societies
societies
2.1 2.3 2011 32.6 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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19 pages, 969 KiB  
Review
The Impact of Green Human Resource Management Practices on Employees, Clients, and Organizational Performance: A Literature Review
by Aisha AlKetbi and John Rice
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14040078 (registering DOI) - 20 Apr 2024
Viewed by 214
Abstract
This literature review aims to examine the relationship between Green Human Resource Management (G-HRM) practices and various outcomes, including employee green attitudes, employee green satisfaction, client green satisfaction, employee green behavior, and organizational green performance. We reviewed existing literature on G-HRM practices and [...] Read more.
This literature review aims to examine the relationship between Green Human Resource Management (G-HRM) practices and various outcomes, including employee green attitudes, employee green satisfaction, client green satisfaction, employee green behavior, and organizational green performance. We reviewed existing literature on G-HRM practices and their impact on the selected outcomes. The review process involved the identification of articles through a systematic search in Scopus and Web of Science databases from January 2013 to December 2023. The search retrieved 2142 citations; of them, a total of 17 articles were deemed eligible for this review. The reviewed literature provides good evidence supporting a positive predictive relationship between G-HRM practices and employee green attitudes, employee green satisfaction, client green satisfaction, employee green behavior, and organizational green performance. However, there is a notable gap in studies exploring the influence of G-HRM practices on employee and client satisfaction. Overall, G-HRM practices emerge as a crucial tool for fostering environmentally conscious attitudes and behaviors among employees, ultimately contributing to enhanced employee satisfaction and improved organizational ecological performance. Future research should pay attention to the mechanisms underlying these relationships and explore potential moderating factors to enrich our understanding of the interrelated dynamics between G-HRM practices and sustainable outcomes. Full article
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15 pages, 503 KiB  
Article
How to Improve an Enterprise’s Innovation Capability from the Perspective of High- and Low-Level Enterprises Using Fuzzy-Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis
by Xiaoyu Bai, Shengxu Xiong, Zhe Zhou and Xin Liu
Sustainability 2024, 16(7), 3036; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16073036 - 05 Apr 2024
Viewed by 471
Abstract
An enterprise’s capability is based on the quantity and collocation pattern of the heterogeneous resources it possesses. Innovation resources are the source of enterprise innovation capability. However, there is still a “black box” problem of the impact of the intensity of government support [...] Read more.
An enterprise’s capability is based on the quantity and collocation pattern of the heterogeneous resources it possesses. Innovation resources are the source of enterprise innovation capability. However, there is still a “black box” problem of the impact of the intensity of government support on enterprise innovation. Therefore, it is necessary to study high- or low-level enterprise innovation capability by combining the internal and external factors of the enterprise—the background characteristics of R&D personnel and the degree of government support. Based on the configuration perspective, this study uses the qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) method to conduct a comparative analysis of the innovation capabilities of enterprises in five time windows over six years with the longitudinal database of China’s industrial enterprises whose operating income exceeds RMB 20 million from 2010 to 2015. This paper summarizes two ways of realizing high-level enterprise innovation capability: female and highly educated R&D personnel type, and highly educated R&D personnel and high government investment type. The enterprise innovation capability is affected simultaneously by multiple conditional variables, and the impact of each conditional variable on enterprise innovation capability has a trend. Further, it analyzes the impact of every antecedent variable comparing high- to low-level enterprise innovation. Full article
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18 pages, 1707 KiB  
Article
Illegitimate Tasks, Negative Affectivity, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior among Private School Teachers: A Mediated–Moderated Model
by Nessrin Shaya, Laila Mohebi, Rekha Pillai and Rawan Abukhait
Sustainability 2024, 16(2), 733; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16020733 - 15 Jan 2024
Viewed by 785
Abstract
Social sustainability has gained popularity over the last decade, with a growing body of research calling for researchers to focus on the personal-level determinants of employee satisfaction and well-being in the pursuit of social sustainability. By using negative affectivity as a mediating mechanism [...] Read more.
Social sustainability has gained popularity over the last decade, with a growing body of research calling for researchers to focus on the personal-level determinants of employee satisfaction and well-being in the pursuit of social sustainability. By using negative affectivity as a mediating mechanism and gender and passive leadership as moderators, this study examines a novel sequential mediation–moderation model that explores the relationship between unreasonable tasks and teachers’ Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB). It employs the Conservation of Resources (COR) and Stress as Offense to Self (SOS) paradigms as a comprehensive theoretical framework for organizational stressors and organizational behavior. A total of 415 matched questionnaire responses were collected from private school teachers in the UAE. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) is conducted using AMOS 20, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) is utilized to verify the causal and moderation hypotheses, and the resulting moderated mediated conceptual model is evaluated by employing Hayes PROCESS analysis. Results demonstrate the effects of illegitimate tasks on OCB are indirect and statistically significant and are mediated through negative affectivity. The cumulative effect of illegitimate tasks and negative affectivity on OCB is magnified by the moderating effects of passive leadership. Full article
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29 pages, 730 KiB  
Article
Organizational Health Behavior Index (OHBI): A Tool for Measuring Organizational Health
by Muath Jaafari, Abad Alzuman, Zaiba Ali, Ansarullah Tantry and Rahila Ali
Sustainability 2023, 15(18), 13650; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151813650 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3034
Abstract
Organizational health helps companies achieve their goals, gain a competitive edge, and boost employee engagement and well-being by determining a company’s ability to establish, communicate, and implement a unified business strategy while retaining highly engaged employees. The current study aimed to develop and [...] Read more.
Organizational health helps companies achieve their goals, gain a competitive edge, and boost employee engagement and well-being by determining a company’s ability to establish, communicate, and implement a unified business strategy while retaining highly engaged employees. The current study aimed to develop and validate an original two-subscale measure that evaluates organizational health behavior determinants, including a quantitative 5-point Likert-type “Subscale A” of 16 items in 5 dimensions (awareness, appreciation, relations, employee engagement, and internal communication) and a qualitative “Subscale B” of 10 items in 3 dimensions (employee persona, organizational culture, and employee voice) called the Organization Health Behavior Index (OHBI). The combination of the two methodologies enhances the study’s credibility, validity, and applicability, as well as its contribution to the field of organizational health behavior research. Furthermore, the study included three sample groups and a sample of 3510 respondents from five sectors in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: agriculture, education, government, health, and logistics. This research includes various stages in the development and evaluation of the psychometric properties of the OHBI. These stages include conducting reliability analysis, performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and finalizing the scale. The model’s fit indices, such as the chi-squared test, comparative fit index (CFI), Tucker–Lewis index (TLI), root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA), and standardized root mean square residual (SRMR), collectively demonstrated a favorable fit for the model. The findings presented in this study offer support for the reliability and validity of the OHBI scale. The OHBI scale comprehensively encompasses the necessary psychometric properties related to its construction and validation, thereby establishing its validity and reliability as a robust measure of organizational health behavior. The OHBI can help create an environment at work that boosts productivity, engagement, and retention. Organizations can compare their health behavior ratings to industry standards or best practices using the index. Full article
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16 pages, 3488 KiB  
Article
Ethical Reasoning at Work: A Cross-Country Comparison of Gender and Age Differences
by Karin Lasthuizen and Kamal Badar
Adm. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci13050136 - 19 May 2023
Viewed by 2681
Abstract
This paper uses the IBE Ethics at Work 2018 survey to explore employees’ ethical reasoning and examine gender and age differences across 12 countries. Debates about gender and ethics have been intense since Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, with feminist critiques from Gilligan [...] Read more.
This paper uses the IBE Ethics at Work 2018 survey to explore employees’ ethical reasoning and examine gender and age differences across 12 countries. Debates about gender and ethics have been intense since Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, with feminist critiques from Gilligan and others advocating the different voice of women, while the recent arrival of Millennials in the workplace has raised new questions about age/generational differences and ethics. The findings in this study suggest that women and older workers have stronger ethical judgments in the workplace than men and younger workers. These gender and age differences, both among employees and managers, are consistent across countries. This study shows that individual characteristics are important for employees’ ethical reasoning, which affects their ability to make ethical decisions and act ethically. Business ethics research should therefore take greater account of differences between (groups of) employees and their learning needs when examining the effectiveness of ethics policies and instruments, while organizations can improve employee ethical reasoning by adopting diversity-based training programs and ethical leadership. Full article
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25 pages, 521 KiB  
Article
The Holistic Model of Labour Retention: The Impact of Workplace Wellbeing Factors on Employee Retention
by Martin Gelencsér, Gábor Szabó-Szentgróti, Zsolt Sándor Kőmüves and Gábor Hollósy-Vadász
Adm. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci13050121 - 01 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 6321
Abstract
This paper explores the holistic context of workforce retention. The global labour shortages in developed countries have made employers realise that in a world of scarce resources, employee wellbeing and retention are key factors in competitiveness. The aim of the research is to [...] Read more.
This paper explores the holistic context of workforce retention. The global labour shortages in developed countries have made employers realise that in a world of scarce resources, employee wellbeing and retention are key factors in competitiveness. The aim of the research is to create a model to identify the key determinants of employee well-being and workforce retention. A quantitative research methodology was applied, using a questionnaire with 58 validated statements, completed online by the research participants (n = 406). The PLS-SEM method was used for data analysis and inner and outer modelling. The measurement model was tested for internal consistency reliability and convergent and discriminant validity. Cronbach’s α and CR values were above the 0.7 threshold for all constructions, indicating high internal consistency of measurements. In our model, there are a total of 36 significant relationships between latent variables. Based on the research results, the effect of organizational commitment on the intention to quit was determined. If the organizational commitment within an organization changes, the intention to resign changes. Thus, critical variables affecting workforce retention (benefits, promotion, communication, nature of work, coworkers, and normative commitment) have been identified, the changing of which will affect organizational commitment. The results support that if employees perceive these factors negatively, their commitment will drastically decrease. Full article
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