Special Issue "Advances in LC Column Technology: Design, Characterization, and Application"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sebastiaan Eeltink
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Department of Chemical Engineering, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium
Interests: separation science; multi-dimensional liquid chromatography; microfluidic chips

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Liquid chromatography (LC) in its various modes has become a pivotal technique in the characterization of purity, identity, and potency of a broad range of molecular compounds. To address the analysis problems, as for example encountered in the chemical industry and in life-science research, column technology has evolved rapidly over the last decade. This special issue will highlight new developments in stationary-phases design (packed columns, monoliths, coating, etc.) and column manufacturing for pressure- and/or electro-driven LC mode, and will describe fundamental aspects of column characterization. In addition, novel emerging applications enabled by new technologies will be included.

I would like to invite all colleagues working in this area of research to contribute original research papers, short communications, and review papers to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Sebastiaan Eeltink
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Core-shell particles
  • Monolithic stationary phases
  • Coated capillaries
  • Pillar-array columns

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
The Development of Silica Hydride Stationary Phases for High-Performance Liquid Chromatography from Conception to Commercialization
Separations 2019, 6(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations6020027 - 21 May 2019
Abstract
The development of a stationary phase material for high-performance liquid chromatography based on a surface of silica hydride as opposed to silanols on ordinary silica is discussed including synthetic approaches, characterization, and applications. There are several synthetic approaches available to create a silica [...] Read more.
The development of a stationary phase material for high-performance liquid chromatography based on a surface of silica hydride as opposed to silanols on ordinary silica is discussed including synthetic approaches, characterization, and applications. There are several synthetic approaches available to create a silica hydride surface. Modification of the Si–H moiety on the silica surface can be accomplished through the use of a hydrosilation reaction. Both the intermediate silica hydride and the material modified with an organic moiety can be characterized by a number of spectroscopic as well as a variety of other methods. Further insights into the retention mechanism are provided through chromatographic measurements. The ultimate utility of any chromatographic stationary phase material is determined by its success in solving challenging analytical problems. A broad range of applications is reviewed to illustrate the versatility and usefulness of silica hydride-based stationary phases. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Fundamental Properties of Packing Materials for Liquid Chromatography
Separations 2019, 6(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations6010002 - 05 Jan 2019
Abstract
The high performance of chemically-modified silica gel packing materials is based on the utilization of pure silica gels. Earlier silica gels used to be made from inorganic silica; however, nowadays, silica gels are made from organic silanes. The surface smoothness and lack of [...] Read more.
The high performance of chemically-modified silica gel packing materials is based on the utilization of pure silica gels. Earlier silica gels used to be made from inorganic silica; however, nowadays, silica gels are made from organic silanes. The surface smoothness and lack of trace metals of new silica gels permits easy surface modifications (chemical reactions) and improves the reproducibility and stability. Sharpening peak symmetry is based on developing better surface modification methods (silylation). Typical examples can be found in the chromatography of amitriptyline for silanol testing and that of quinizarin for trace metal testing. These test compounds were selected and demonstrated sensitive results in the measurement of trace amounts of either silanol or trace metals. Here, we demonstrate the three-dimensional model chemical structures of bonded-phase silica gels with surface electron density for easy understanding of the molecular interaction sites with analytes. Furthermore, a quantitative explanation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic liquid chromatographies was provided. The synthesis methods of superficially porous silica gels and their modified products were introduced. Full article
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