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Special Issue "Wireless Sensing Systems for Body Area Networks"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensor Networks".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Boon-Chong Seet
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Fax: +64 9 921 9973
Interests: 5G wireless communications; antennas and radio frequency-based sensors; smart textile and wearable technologies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Xuejun Li
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Interests: wireless networking; wireless communications; networking protocols; radio frequency integrated circuits; wireless sensor networks; video streaming; system optimization; evolutionary computing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Body area networks (BANs) are a form of small-scale wireless sensor network (WSN) deployed on the human body, often for monitoring human physiological parameters and bodily movements. As the bridge between BANs and their external users, on-body or implanted radio frequency (RF) structures such as antennas fabricated with soft materials have gained much attention in recent years. These same structures can also function as sensors if their characteristics can naturally or be engineered to react to bodily phenomena such as temperature and humidity. These RF structures with sensing capability can be referred to as wireless sensing structures. For a system consisting of a wireless sensing structure, and circuitry or device for detection and interpretation of signal outputs from these sensing structures, we refer to it as a wireless sensing system. Such systems have been proposed for such BAN applications as body temperature sensing, foot pressure sensing, sweat analysis and gesture monitoring, among others.

This Special Issue invites original contributions on all topics related to wireless sensing systems for BANs, including but not limited to:

  • Microwave and millimeter-wave sensors for BANs
  • Radio frequency structures for sensing applications in BANs
  • Flexible, wearable and disposable sensors and wireless sub-systems for BANs
  • Harvested energy powered wireless sensing systems for BANs
  • Ultra-low power sensing, processing and communications for BANs
  • Robust signal detection and interpretation for body sensors in BANs
  • Backscattering for sensing and communication in BANs
  • Fabrication techniques for sensors and wireless sub-systems in BANs
  • Characterization methods for radio frequency-based sensors in BANs
  • Conductive and dielectric sensing materials (including metamaterials) for BANs
  • Body-centric communications for on-body and implanted sensors in BANs
  • Testbeds and real-world deployments

Assoc. Prof. Boon-Chong Seet
Dr. Xuejun Li
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wireless sensing
  • body area network
  • radio frequency
  • signal detection and interpretation
  • energy harvesting
  • communication
  • fabrication
  • characterization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Higher Order Feature Extraction and Selection for Robust Human Gesture Recognition using CSI of COTS Wi-Fi Devices
Sensors 2019, 19(13), 2959; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19132959 - 04 Jul 2019
Abstract
Device-free human gesture recognition (HGR) using commercial off the shelf (COTS) Wi-Fi devices has gained attention with recent advances in wireless technology. HGR recognizes the human activity performed, by capturing the reflections of Wi-Fi signals from moving humans and storing them as raw [...] Read more.
Device-free human gesture recognition (HGR) using commercial off the shelf (COTS) Wi-Fi devices has gained attention with recent advances in wireless technology. HGR recognizes the human activity performed, by capturing the reflections of Wi-Fi signals from moving humans and storing them as raw channel state information (CSI) traces. Existing work on HGR applies noise reduction and transformation to pre-process the raw CSI traces. However, these methods fail to capture the non-Gaussian information in the raw CSI data due to its limitation to deal with linear signal representation alone. The proposed higher order statistics-based recognition (HOS-Re) model extracts higher order statistical (HOS) features from raw CSI traces and selects a robust feature subset for the recognition task. HOS-Re addresses the limitations in the existing methods, by extracting third order cumulant features that maximizes the recognition accuracy. Subsequently, feature selection methods derived from information theory construct a robust and highly informative feature subset, fed as input to the multilevel support vector machine (SVM) classifier in order to measure the performance. The proposed methodology is validated using a public database SignFi, consisting of 276 gestures with 8280 gesture instances, out of which 5520 are from the laboratory and 2760 from the home environment using a 10 × 5 cross-validation. HOS-Re achieved an average recognition accuracy of 97.84%, 98.26% and 96.34% for the lab, home and lab + home environment respectively. The average recognition accuracy for 150 sign gestures with 7500 instances, collected from five different users was 96.23% in the laboratory environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Sensing Systems for Body Area Networks)
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Open AccessArticle
A Smart Phone Based Handheld Wireless Spirometer with Functions and Precision Comparable to Laboratory Spirometers
Sensors 2019, 19(11), 2487; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19112487 - 31 May 2019
Abstract
We report a smart phone based handheld wireless spirometer which uses a Lilly type sensing flowhead for respiratory signal acquisition and transmits the data to smartphone or other mobile terminals with Bluetooth signal transmission for data processing and result display. The developed spirometer [...] Read more.
We report a smart phone based handheld wireless spirometer which uses a Lilly type sensing flowhead for respiratory signal acquisition and transmits the data to smartphone or other mobile terminals with Bluetooth signal transmission for data processing and result display. The developed spirometer was demonstrated to be able to detect flow rates ranging from 0–15 L/s with an accuracy of 4 mL/s, and can perform tests of flow volume (FV), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), etc. By having the functions and precision comparable to laboratory spirometers, it satisfies the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) proposed performance requirements for spirometer. At the same time, it is low cost, light and handy, low power consumption battery-powered. The test of 12 cases of subjects using the developed spirometer also indicated that it was easy to use for both providers and patients, and suitable for the Point of Care Test (POCT) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma at general-practice settings and homes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Sensing Systems for Body Area Networks)
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Open AccessArticle
Bend and Moisture Effects on the Performance of a U-Shaped Slotted Wearable Antenna for Off-Body Communications in an Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) 2.4 GHz band
Sensors 2019, 19(8), 1804; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19081804 - 15 Apr 2019
Abstract
In recent years, the study and design of wearable antennas have been empowered given the success of Wireless Body Area Networks (WBAN) for healthcare and medical purposes. This work analyses a flexible textile antenna whose performance can be optimised by the careful selection [...] Read more.
In recent years, the study and design of wearable antennas have been empowered given the success of Wireless Body Area Networks (WBAN) for healthcare and medical purposes. This work analyses a flexible textile antenna whose performance can be optimised by the careful selection of the substrate thickness of the textile material, and by varying the antenna’s geometrical shape. After considering these parameters, several arrangements of antennas were simulated using the Computer Simulation Technology software (CST). The results of the simulations were compared to the experimental prototypes manufactured on a flexible felt material for a range of thicknesses and curvatures of the antenna substrate. Such antenna designs can be utilised in off-body communications and ISM applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Sensing Systems for Body Area Networks)
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