sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Energy-Harvesting Microsystems and Microsensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Nagamalleswara Rao Alluri
Website
Guest Editor
Nano Materials and System Laboratory, Department of Mechatronics Engineering, College of Engineering, Jeju National University, 690-756 Jeju-Do, Korea
Interests: functional nanomaterials; piezoelectric/triboelectric harvesting; self-powered sensors; piezo-phototronic devices; single crystal growth techniques; micro/nanodevice fabrication methods
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The demand for alternative energy harvesting approaches (small and large scale) is increasing day-by-day due to industrialization in every sector, the tremendous growth of the population, and the development of automated lifestyles. Human lives are in danger due to the massive consumption of natural resources and the catastrophic increase in environmental pollution. To control this, renewable technologies such as solar cells, fuel cells, and hydrogen energy processes have been developed; however, they are unable to utilize the abundant amount of mechanical energy waste produced by society. A new energy harvesting approach is required to harness energy from biomechanical motion, ocean waves, and wind motion. Triboelectric, piezoelectric energy harvesting systems show the way to generate clean energy, and fabricated devices can use a micro-power source to drive low-power-consuming sensors and systems. Sometimes, nanogenerators can play a dual role, such as energy harvesting and active sensing, to monitor various physical, chemical, and biological stimuli. Here, the performance of all of these technologies mainly depends on the design and development of efficient nanomaterials, ceramics, polymers, composite materials, and novel design architectures. To reach this goal, new synthesis routes, flexible in-device designs, cost-effectiveness, and improvement in the power density of devices is highly necessary.

For this Special Issue of Sensors, we aim to present a collection of review and original research articles related to the development of micro energy harvesters as well as sensors. We invite scientists and academic researchers across the globe to contribute relevant articles.

Dr. Nagamalleswara Rao Alluri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • piezoelectric materials
  • 2D materials
  • ferroelectric materials
  • self-powered sensors
  • piezoelectric nanogenerator
  • triboelectric nanogenerator
  • piezo-phototronic effect
  • MEMS sensors

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Universal Triboelectric Nanogenerator Simulation Based on Dynamic Finite Element Method Model
Sensors 2020, 20(17), 4838; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20174838 - 27 Aug 2020
Abstract
The lack of a universal simulation method for triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) makes the device design and optimization difficult before experiment, which protracts the research and development process and hinders the landing of practical TENG applications. The existing electrostatic induction models for TENGs have [...] Read more.
The lack of a universal simulation method for triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) makes the device design and optimization difficult before experiment, which protracts the research and development process and hinders the landing of practical TENG applications. The existing electrostatic induction models for TENGs have limitations in simulating TENGs with complex geometries and their dynamic behaviors under practical movements due to the topology change issues. Here, a dynamic finite element method (FEM) model is proposed. The introduction of air buffer layers and the moving mesh method eliminates the topology change issues during practical movement and allows simulation of dynamic and time-varying behaviors of TENGs with complex 2D/3D geometries. Systematic investigations are carried out to optimize the air buffer thickness and mesh densities, and the optimized results show excellent consistency with the experimental data and results based on other existing methods. It also shows that a 3D disk-type rotating TENG can be simulated using the model, clearly demonstrating the capability and superiority of the dynamic FEM model. Moreover, the dynamic FEM model is used to optimize the shape of the tribo-material, which is used as a preliminary example to demonstrate the possibility of designing a TENG-based sensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy-Harvesting Microsystems and Microsensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop