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Special Issue "Development of Virtual and Augmented Reality Systems for Health and Clinical Assessment"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Patricia Sánchez González
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biomedical Engineering and Telemedicine Centre, ETSI Telecomunicación, Center for Biomedical Technology, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: virtual reality; computer vision; medical education and assessment; patient rehabilitation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ignacio Oropesa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biomedical Engineering and Telemedicine Centre, ETSI Telecomunicación, Centre for Biomedical Technology, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040, Spain
Interests: video-based tracking; biomedical signal processing; virtual reality; augmented reality machine/deep learning; wearables; natural language processing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are redefining what is possible in healthcare. These technologies are becoming more widespread every day, thanks to the recent availability of cheap commercial solutions. Novel applications are being continuously pursued to develop new effective and engaging interventions. Thus, the number of potential applications of VR and AR is also growing constantly, including health promotion, management and care.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to present the recent advancements in VR and AR systems in healthcare applications. Areas of interest of these systems are numerous. These include: lifestyles education, patient rehabilitation, medical and surgical training, clinical assessment of elderly people, paediatric patients and pain management

Contributions may focus on preliminary feasibility of applied innovative technologies or novel applications for existing ones. Studies may cover different stages of the technological and clinical validation.

Dr. Patricia Sánchez González
Dr. Ignacio Oropesa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • virtual reality
  • augmented reality
  • healthcare
  • medical applications
  • rehabilitation
  • medical education
  • pain management
  • patient education

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Communication
Rest Intervals during Virtual Reality Gaming Augments Standing Postural Sway Disturbance
Sensors 2021, 21(20), 6817; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21206817 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 271
Abstract
Immersive virtual reality (VR) can cause acute sickness, visual disturbance, and balance impairment. Some manufacturers recommend intermittent breaks to overcome these issues; however, limited evidence examining whether this is beneficial exists. The aim of this study was to examine whether taking breaks during [...] Read more.
Immersive virtual reality (VR) can cause acute sickness, visual disturbance, and balance impairment. Some manufacturers recommend intermittent breaks to overcome these issues; however, limited evidence examining whether this is beneficial exists. The aim of this study was to examine whether taking breaks during VR gaming reduced its effect on postural sway during standing balance assessments. Twenty-five people participated in this crossover design study, performing 50 min of VR gaming either continuously or with intermittent 10 min exposure/rest intervals. Standing eyes open, two-legged balance assessments were performed immediately pre-, immediately post- and 40 min post-exposure. The primary outcome measure was total path length; secondary measures included independent axis path velocity, amplitude, standard deviation, discrete and continuous wavelet transform-derived variables, and detrended fluctuation analysis. Total path length was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced immediately post-VR gaming exposure in the intermittent rest break group both in comparison to within-condition baseline values and between-condition timepoint results. Conversely, it remained consistent across timepoints in the continuous exposure group. These changes consisted of a more clustered movement speed pattern about a lower central frequency, evidenced by signal frequency content. These findings indicate that caution is required before recommending rest breaks during VR exposure until we know more about how balance and falls risk are affected. Full article
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Article
Hybrid Simulation and Planning Platform for Cryosurgery with Microsoft HoloLens
Sensors 2021, 21(13), 4450; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21134450 - 29 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 587
Abstract
Cryosurgery is a technique of growing popularity involving tissue ablation under controlled freezing. Technological advancement of devices along with surgical technique improvements have turned cryosurgery from an experimental to an established option for treating several diseases. However, cryosurgery is still limited by inaccurate [...] Read more.
Cryosurgery is a technique of growing popularity involving tissue ablation under controlled freezing. Technological advancement of devices along with surgical technique improvements have turned cryosurgery from an experimental to an established option for treating several diseases. However, cryosurgery is still limited by inaccurate planning based primarily on 2D visualization of the patient’s preoperative images. Several works have been aimed at modelling cryoablation through heat transfer simulations; however, most software applications do not meet some key requirements for clinical routine use, such as high computational speed and user-friendliness. This work aims to develop an intuitive platform for anatomical understanding and pre-operative planning by integrating the information content of radiological images and cryoprobe specifications either in a 3D virtual environment (desktop application) or in a hybrid simulator, which exploits the potential of the 3D printing and augmented reality functionalities of Microsoft HoloLens. The proposed platform was preliminarily validated for the retrospective planning/simulation of two surgical cases. Results suggest that the platform is easy and quick to learn and could be used in clinical practice to improve anatomical understanding, to make surgical planning easier than the traditional method, and to strengthen the memorization of surgical planning. Full article
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