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Special Issue "Sensors Based on Diffraction Structures"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nikolay Kazanskiy
Website
Guest Editor
Samara National Research University, 34 Moskovkoye Shosse, Samara 443086, Russia
Interests: computer optics; diffractive nanophotonics; computer vision; plasmonic sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optical sensors are widely used in various research and commercial applications today. These sensors are utilized for quality and process control, medical technologies, metrology, imaging, and remote sensing and laser, imaging systems, and or/fibers. This Special Issue of Sensors will focus on the recent developments of optical sensors based on diffraction structures. However, the issue is open for new proposals of novel sensing principals. Review articles and original research papers based on theoretical, numerical, and experimental work addressing new and innovative applications are welcome.

I look forward to receiving your proposals.

Prof. Dr. Nikolay Kazanskiy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • plasmonic sensors
  • resonance structures
  • advanced sensing platforms
  • gas sensors
  • miniaturized lab-on-chip sensor designs
  • diffraction structures
  • surface plasmon-polariton
  • vortex beam
  • plasmonic lens

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Compact Imaging Systems Based on Annular Harmonic Lenses
Sensors 2020, 20(14), 3914; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20143914 - 14 Jul 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this study, a configuration of a compact imaging objective based on a reflecting annular harmonic lens was proposed. Light propagation through the proposed optical system was comprehensively modeled using a dedicated special program and the ZEMAX software, with the latter used to [...] Read more.
In this study, a configuration of a compact imaging objective based on a reflecting annular harmonic lens was proposed. Light propagation through the proposed optical system was comprehensively modeled using a dedicated special program and the ZEMAX software, with the latter used to derive the point spread function (PSF). Several relationships were used to describe the connection between key parameters of the objective, including its focal length, field of view, and thickness. We demonstrated that it was possible to design a compact imaging objective whose overall length could be one to two orders of magnitude smaller than its focal length. Using direct laser writing, a reflecting annular harmonic lens was fabricated and used in the proposed objective scheme. The performance of the objective was experimentally studied by imaging a light source and a test pattern. The performance of the compact imaging objective based on a reflecting annular harmonic lens was verified in principle. A PSF value of approximately 16 microns was experimentally obtained, for a lens with a diameter of 25 mm with a focal length of 100 mm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Based on Diffraction Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Wavefront Aberration Sensor Based on a Multichannel Diffractive Optical Element
Sensors 2020, 20(14), 3850; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20143850 - 10 Jul 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
We propose a new type of a wavefront aberration sensor, that is, a Zernike matched multichannel diffractive optical filter, which performs consistent filtering of phase distributions corresponding to Zernike polynomials. The sensitivity of the new sensor is theoretically estimated. Based on the theory, [...] Read more.
We propose a new type of a wavefront aberration sensor, that is, a Zernike matched multichannel diffractive optical filter, which performs consistent filtering of phase distributions corresponding to Zernike polynomials. The sensitivity of the new sensor is theoretically estimated. Based on the theory, we develop recommendations for its application. Test wavefronts formed using a spatial light modulator are experimentally investigated. The applicability of the new sensor for the fine-tuning of a laser collimator is assessed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Based on Diffraction Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Subwavelength Grating Double Slot Waveguide Racetrack Ring Resonator for Refractive Index Sensing Application
Sensors 2020, 20(12), 3416; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20123416 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this paper, a racetrack ring resonator design based on a subwavelength grating double slot waveguide is presented. The proposed waveguide scheme is capable of confining the transverse electric field in the slots and the gaps between the grating segments. This configuration facilitates [...] Read more.
In this paper, a racetrack ring resonator design based on a subwavelength grating double slot waveguide is presented. The proposed waveguide scheme is capable of confining the transverse electric field in the slots and the gaps between the grating segments. This configuration facilitates a large light–matter interaction which elevates the sensitivity of the device approximately 2.5 times higher than the one that can be obtained via a standard slot waveguide resonator. The best sensitivity of the design is obtained at 1000 nm/RIU by utilizing a subwavelength grating double slot waveguide of period 300 nm. The numerical study is conducted via 2D and 3D finite element methods. We believe that the proposed sensor design can play an important role in the realization of highly sensitive lab-on-chip sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Based on Diffraction Structures)
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Other

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Open AccessLetter
Lensless Scheme for Measuring Laser Aberrations Based on Computer-Generated Holograms
Sensors 2020, 20(15), 4310; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20154310 - 02 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
All of the existing holographic wavefront sensors are either bulky or have low accuracy of measuring wavefront aberrations. In this paper, we present an improvement of the holographic method of measuring wavefront aberrations using computer-generated Fourier holograms. The novelty of this work lies [...] Read more.
All of the existing holographic wavefront sensors are either bulky or have low accuracy of measuring wavefront aberrations. In this paper, we present an improvement of the holographic method of measuring wavefront aberrations using computer-generated Fourier holograms. The novelty of this work lies in the proposed approach to the synthesis of Fourier holograms, which are implemented using phase-only SLM. The main advantages of this method are the increased diffraction efficiency compared to the previously known methods, and the more compact implementation scheme due to the elimination of the conventional Fourier-lens. The efficiency of the proposed method was confirmed by numerical simulation and optical experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Based on Diffraction Structures)
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Open AccessLetter
An Airborne Offner Imaging Hyperspectrometer with Radially-Fastened Primary Elements
Sensors 2020, 20(12), 3411; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20123411 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
We propose a new layout for the Offner imaging hyperspectrometer that is utilized onboard small space vehicles. The layout is based on a method of adjusting the adaptive temperature-dependent optical scheme by moving just two coaxial optical components located inside the hyperspectrometer. We [...] Read more.
We propose a new layout for the Offner imaging hyperspectrometer that is utilized onboard small space vehicles. The layout is based on a method of adjusting the adaptive temperature-dependent optical scheme by moving just two coaxial optical components located inside the hyperspectrometer. We present the results of modeling for a temperature range of −40 to +45 °C and an optical experiment using a heat and cold chamber for the range of 12 to 40 °C, proving the basic functionality of the proposed layout. Based on simulation results, the new layout is supposed to allow the hyperspectrometer to operate in a temperature range of −40 to +45 °C without its optical characteristics deteriorating, thus making it suitable for work onboard space or stratospheric vehicles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Based on Diffraction Structures)
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