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Topical Advisory Panel Members’ Collection Series: Nanomaterials-Based Electrochemical Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 September 2024 | Viewed by 3358

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, 20-708 Lublin, Poland
Interests: development of electrochemical sensors; voltammetric sensors; electrode surface modification; development of analytical approaches for quantitative analysis of biomolecules; biomarker research; liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry; tryptophan metabolism; mycotoxins determination; sample preparation; biofluids analysis; food analysis
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Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Department of Energy Systems, School of Technology, University of Thessaly, Geopolis, Ring-Road of Larisa-Trikala, GR-41500 Larisa, Greece
Interests: electrochemistry; gas sensors; glucose; nanotechnology; bio-sensors; amperometric sensors; oxygen reduction reaction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Developments in nanotechnology have opened up new opportunities in the field of electrochemical sensing. The application of nanomaterials as modifiers of surfaces of accessible electrodes profoundly revolutionized the sensitivity, precision, efficiency, and diversity of electrochemical sensors. Diverse forms and kinds of nanomaterials (such as gold, silver, and silicon nanomaterials; carbon nanostructures; titanium dioxide nanotubes; magnetic nanoparticles; and cellulose nanofiber-based nanocapsules) have been applied to develop new sensors with superior electrochemical properties.

The present Special Issue is dedicated to presenting recent achievements in the design and application of nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for different aspects of human and environmental welfare. Both review articles and original research papers are welcome. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, recent developments in the following research areas:

  • Fabrication of nanomaterials;
  • Fabrication of sensors and new strategies for electrode surface modification;
  • Development of analytical methods using nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors;
  • Evaluation of performance of nanomaterial-based sensors;
  • Surface characterization of sensors modified with nanomaterials;
  • Application in the analysis of biological fluids, pharmaceuticals, food, and environmental samples.

We are looking forward to receiving your interesting submissions for the newly opened Special Issue.

Dr. Ilona Sadok
Dr. Angeliki Brouzgou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electrochemical sensors
  • nanomaterials
  • carbon nanomaterials
  • noble metal nanoparticles
  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • electrode surface modification

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 12008 KiB  
Article
Electrochemical DNA-Sensor Based on Macrocyclic Dendrimers with Terminal Amino Groups and Carbon Nanomaterials
by Tatjana Kulikova, Rezeda Shamagsumova, Alexey Rogov, Ivan Stoikov, Pavel Padnya, Igor Shiabiev and Gennady Evtugyn
Sensors 2023, 23(10), 4761; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23104761 - 15 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1428
Abstract
The assembling of thiacalix[4]arene-based dendrimers in cone, partial cone, and 1,3-alternate configuration on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode coated with carbon black or multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been characterized using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. [...] Read more.
The assembling of thiacalix[4]arene-based dendrimers in cone, partial cone, and 1,3-alternate configuration on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode coated with carbon black or multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been characterized using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Native and damaged DNA were electrostatically accumulated on the modifier layer. The influence of the charge of the redox indicator and of the macrocycle/DNA ratio was quantified and the roles of the electrostatic interactions and of the diffusional transfer of the redox indicator to the electrode interface indicator access were established. The developed DNA sensors were tested on discrimination of native, thermally denatured, and chemically damaged DNA and on the determination of doxorubicin as the model intercalator. The limit of detection of doxorubicin established for the biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes was equal to 1.0 pM with recovery from spiked human serum of 105–120%. After further optimization of the assembling directed towards the stabilization of the signal, the developed DNA sensors can find application in the preliminary screening of antitumor drugs and thermal damage of DNA. They can also be applied for testing potential drug/DNA nanocontainers as future delivery systems. Full article
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8 pages, 967 KiB  
Communication
Electrochemical Evaluation of Tyrosinase Enzymatic Activity in Deep Eutectic Solvent and Aqueous Deep Eutectic Solvent
by Rossella Svigelj, Fabiola Zanette and Rosanna Toniolo
Sensors 2023, 23(8), 3915; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23083915 - 12 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1499
Abstract
The use of green, inexpensive, and biodegradable deep eutectic solvents as nonaqueous solvents and electrolytes could be a useful way to potentially improve the enzyme biosensor performance as well as a profitable strategy to extend their use in the gas phase. However, enzyme [...] Read more.
The use of green, inexpensive, and biodegradable deep eutectic solvents as nonaqueous solvents and electrolytes could be a useful way to potentially improve the enzyme biosensor performance as well as a profitable strategy to extend their use in the gas phase. However, enzyme activity in these media, although fundamental for their implementation in electrochemical analysis, is still almost unexplored. In this study, an electrochemical approach was employed to monitor tyrosinase enzyme activity in a deep eutectic solvent. This study was performed in a DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) as a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) and glycerol as a hydrogen bond donor (HBD), while phenol was chosen as the prototype analyte. The tyrosinase enzyme was immobilized on a gold-nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrode, and its activity was monitored following the reduction current of orthoquinone produced by the tyrosinase biocatalysis of phenol. This work represents a first step toward the realization of green electrochemical biosensors capable of operating in both nonaqueous and gaseous media for the chemical analysis of phenols. Full article
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