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Special Issue "Plasmonic Biosensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Venkat R. Bhethanabotla
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, University of South Florida Tampa, Tampa, FL, USA
Interests: chemical and biological sensors and systems; plasmonics; catalysis; sensors research involving utilizing acoustic wave devices
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sanchari Chowdhury
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 801 Leroy Pl, Socorro, NM 87801, USA
Interests: plasmonic; solar energy conversion; single molecule microscopy; catalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasmonic materials interact with light to produce collective oscillations of free charges at the boundaries between metal and dielectric, which are often categorized into two classes: propagating surface plasmons (PSP) and localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance. Since the first demonstration of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors to study processes at the surfaces of metals in the early 1980s, SPR biosensors have made vast technological and commercial advances. Different formats of plasmon resonance are implemented for sensing biomolecules and for studying their interactions and properties. One common mechanism is detecting the change in the SPR response due to the slightest modification of the refractive index of dielectric medium upon bimolecular binding. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) supported by metallic nanoparticles is another powerful technique for highly sensitive biosensing. Using LSPR to focus the electromagnetic field at nanoscale is extensively applied in numerous surface-enhanced spectroscopic processes, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF), to detect molecules of biological relevance. The distance dependence of the enhanced electromagnetic field around plasmonic nanoparticles and the LSPR wavelength-shift due to change in medium have been employed for real-time sensitive detection of different biomolecules and their interactions. Reversible conformational changes of unlabeled proteins, sensing of single biomolecules, label-free detection of enzyme-reactant interactions, and nucleic acid detection are a few examples of LSPR-based sensing. Photothermal properties of plasmonic nanoparticles provide another attractive avenue for sensing. Photothermal gold nanoparticles are used to achieve ultrafast real-rime bioassays based on nucleic acid amplification and quantification via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ease of integrating LSPR biosensors in miniaturized optical platforms has led to a surge of interest in integrating those in a portable point of care (PoC) diagnostic or spectroscopy platform. Integrability with microfluidic systems, multiplexing, and high-throughput label-free real-time analysis of molecular interaction offer major advantages for developing PoC plasmonic devices. However, there are some major limitations which need to be addressed in future research for effective PoC devices based on LSPR biosensing. Some of those challenges are the absorptive losses inherent in some plasmonic metals, specificity of analyte recognition, and the difficulty in immobilizing the target molecule near the plasmonic nanoparticles. While label-free detection is a key advantage in plasmonic biosensing, additional sensor system level advances are needed to address the influence of nonspecific interactions on the plasmonic signal. Finally, theoretical developments at the classical, semi-classical, and quantum mechanical levels for the above-described plasmonic phenomena will lead to better sensor designs. Utilization of any of the above phenomena towards plasmonic biosensing is of interest to this Special Issue, and such contributions are invited.

Prof. Dr. Venkat R. Bhethanabotla
Prof. Dr. Sanchari Chowdhury
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Communication
Fractional Derivative Modification of Drude Model
Sensors 2021, 21(15), 4974; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21154974 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 282
Abstract
A novel, two-parameter modification of a Drude model, based on fractional time derivatives, is presented. The dielectric susceptibility is calculated analytically and simulated numerically, showing good agreement between theoretical description and numerical results. The absorption coefficient and wave vector are shown to follow [...] Read more.
A novel, two-parameter modification of a Drude model, based on fractional time derivatives, is presented. The dielectric susceptibility is calculated analytically and simulated numerically, showing good agreement between theoretical description and numerical results. The absorption coefficient and wave vector are shown to follow a power law in the frequency domain, which is a common phenomenon in electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation in complex media such as biological tissues. The main novelty of the proposal is the introduction of two separate parameters that provide a more flexible model than most other approaches found in the literature. Moreover, an efficient numerical implementation of the model is presented and its accuracy and stability are examined. Finally, the model is applied to an exemplary soft tissue, confirming its flexibility and usefulness in the context of medical biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonic Biosensors)
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Letter
Combined SPRi Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Nitrate and Ammonium in Wastewater
Sensors 2021, 21(3), 725; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030725 - 21 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 684
Abstract
Water pollution is a serious problem in modern society. Agriculture, being responsible for the discharge of agrochemicals, organic matter, or drug residues, produces a huge amount of wastewater. Aquaponics has the potential to reduce both water consumption and the impact of water pollution [...] Read more.
Water pollution is a serious problem in modern society. Agriculture, being responsible for the discharge of agrochemicals, organic matter, or drug residues, produces a huge amount of wastewater. Aquaponics has the potential to reduce both water consumption and the impact of water pollution on fish farming and plant production. In the aquatic environment, inorganic nitrogen is mostly present in the form of nitrate and ammonium ions. Nitrate, as a final product of ammonia mineralization, is the most common chemical contaminant in aquifers around the world. For continuous monitoring of nitrogen compounds in wastewater, we propose a sensor for the simultaneous detection of nitrate and ammonium. A surface plasmon resonance imaging method with enzyme-mediated detection was used. Active layers of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were created on the gold surface of a biochip and tested for the sensing of nitrate and ammonium in water from an aquaponic system. The proposed sensor was applied in water samples with a concentration of NO3 and NH4+ in a range between 24–780 mg·L−1 and 0.26–120 mg·L−1, respectively, with minimal pretreatment of a sample by its dilution with a buffer prior to contact on a biochip surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonic Biosensors)
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