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Special Issue "Optical Resonator"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2022) | Viewed by 3005

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Vladimir Yu. Venediktov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Laser Measuring and Navigation Systems, Saint Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI”, 197022 St. Petersburg, Russia
2. Department of General Physics, Saint Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg, Russia
Interests: optical sensors; rotation sensors; accelerometers; adaptive optics; holography; optical resonators; wavefront sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optical resonators or optical cavities represent a kind of tuning-fork for the world of optics, laser science, and photonics. In fact, following the introduction of the Fabrys–Perot interferometer 120 years ago, they became the basis for numerous devices, most importantly lasers. Today, there are numerous known variants of devices with the closed-loop trace of optical rays, which are characterized by the existence of their eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies. These are linear and ring cavities, 3D, planar, and waveguide resonators, passive (empty) and active (laser) cavities, etc., with the resonators of the whispering gallery modes, the microspherical resonators, and other advanced schemes later added to this list. Since their eigenfrequencies of all optical cavities are extremely sensitive to any variations of the optical length of the resonator or changes in its shape, they provide a very sensitive tool for various kinds of sensors and sensing devices—from microbiology and nanophotonics to optical gyros. In this Special Issue on optical resonator sensors, we anticipate papers on all possible existing and future sensors and sensing technologies, employing optical cavities of any kind.

Prof. Dr. Vladimir Yu. Venediktov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • optical resonator
  • optical cavity
  • eigenmode
  • eigenfrequency

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Prototype for a Passive Resonant Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyroscope with a 3 × 3 Directional Coupler
Sensors 2023, 23(3), 1319; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23031319 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 486
Abstract
Reducing the dimensions of optical gyroscopes is a crucial task and resonant fiber optic gyroscopes are promising candidates for its solution. The paper presents a prototype of a miniature resonant interferometric gyroscope of a strategic accuracy class. Due to the use of passive [...] Read more.
Reducing the dimensions of optical gyroscopes is a crucial task and resonant fiber optic gyroscopes are promising candidates for its solution. The paper presents a prototype of a miniature resonant interferometric gyroscope of a strategic accuracy class. Due to the use of passive optical elements in this gyroscope, it has a great potential for miniaturization, alongside a low production cost and ease of implementation, since it does not require many feedback loops. The presented prototype shows results on a zero instability of 20°/h and an angle random walk of 0.16°/√h. A theoretical model explaining the nature of the multipath interference of resonant spectra and establishing the relationship between the resonator parameters and the output parameters of the presented prototype is proposed. The results predicted are in agreement with the experimental data. The prototype gyroscope demonstrates a scale factor instability and a change in the average signal level, which is due to the presence of polarization non-reciprocity, occurring due to the induced birefringence in the single-mode fiber of the contour. This problem requires further investigation to be performed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Resonator)
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Article
Vibration Property of a Cryogenic Optical Resonator within a Pulse-Tube Cryostat
Sensors 2021, 21(14), 4696; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21144696 - 09 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1355
Abstract
Cryogenic ultrastable laser cavities push laser stability to new levels due to their lower thermal noise limitation. Vibrational noise is one of the major obstacles to achieve a thermal-noise-limited cryogenic ultrastable laser system. Here, we carefully analyze the vibrational noise contribution to the [...] Read more.
Cryogenic ultrastable laser cavities push laser stability to new levels due to their lower thermal noise limitation. Vibrational noise is one of the major obstacles to achieve a thermal-noise-limited cryogenic ultrastable laser system. Here, we carefully analyze the vibrational noise contribution to the laser frequency. We measure the vibrational noise from the top of the pulse-tube cryocooler down to the experiment space. Major differences emerge between room and cryogenic temperature operation. We cooled a homemade 6 cm sapphire optical resonator down to 3.4 K. Locking a 1064 nm laser to the resonator, we measure a frequency stability of 1.3×1015. The vibration sensitivities change at different excitation frequencies. The vibrational noise analysis of the laser system paves the way for in situ accurate evaluation of vibrational noise for cryogenic systems. This may help in cryostat design and cryogenic precision measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Resonator)
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