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New Advances and Applications in Environmental Electrochemical Gas Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 2271

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Physics, Institute for Micromanufacturing, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272, USA
Interests: electroceramic materials; gas sensors; perovskite materials; solid oxide fuel cells; solid-state electrochemistry; corrosion; 3D printing; surface chemistry; electrocatalysis
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Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Interests: gas sensors; diamond-based neuro sensors; diamond-electrochemistry; enzymatic-neuro sensors; polymer-based sensors; surface chemistry; material characterization; electrodeposition; energy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Corning Incorporated, Research and Development, 21 Lynn Morse Drive, Painted Post, NY 14870, USA
Interests: electrochemistry; biosensors; microcantilever-based sensors; optical fibers; optical sensors; optics; photonics; microfabrication; micro-optics devices; gas sensors

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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences and Technologies (DISTEBA), University of Salento, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Interests: electrochemistry; (bio)sensors; surface analysis; thin (bio)films; nano materials; CMEs
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The continuous release of various chemical pollutants as gaseous material from industries, automobiles, and households into the environment has an acute global impact. Such chemical pollutant release has accelerated climate change through several detrimental issues, such as the greenhouse effect, acid rain, ozone depletion, etc. Hence, electrochemical sensors that can play a critical role in environmental monitoring and control (both outdoor and indoor), facilitating a better quality of life and environmental health, have an ever-increasing role to play. The projected increase in global energy usage and simultaneous release of pollutants demand the R&D of robust, reliable, and cheaper sensors. In this regard, gas sensors based on electrochemical platforms are attractive. Electrochemical sensors can achieve rapid, selective, sensitive, and efficient detection of gases and chemical vapors. Such sensors are readily amenable to miniaturization by association with existing chip-based electrical systems. This Special Issue aims to showcase the latest significant developments in the fundamental and applied research of electrochemical gas sensors for environmental monitoring. The Special Issue will cover broad topics ranging from sensor design and testing, new developments in semiconductor materials for enhanced sensing, and nanomaterials for transducers, including nanoparticles and organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposites.

Dr. Erica Perry Murray 
Dr. Gaurab Dutta
Dr. Agnivo Gosai
Dr. Maria Rachele Guascito
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electrochemical characterization
  • redox reactions
  • interface reaction kinetics
  • pollution
  • air quality measurement
  • nanocomposites
  • internet of things
  • gas detectors
  • nanomaterials
  • semiconductor sensors
  • climate change
  • meteorology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 3054 KiB  
Article
Nb2O5 Microcolumns for Ethanol Sensing
by Gayan W. C. Kumarage, Shasika A. Panamaldeniya, Valentin A. Maraloiu, Buddhika S. Dassanayake, Nanda Gunawardhana and Elisabetta Comini
Sensors 2024, 24(6), 1851; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24061851 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 661
Abstract
Pseudohexagonal Nb2O5 microcolumns spanning a size range of 50 to 610 nm were synthesized utilizing a cost-effective hydrothermal process (maintained at 180 °C for 30 min), followed by a subsequent calcination step at 500 °C for 3 h. Raman spectroscopy [...] Read more.
Pseudohexagonal Nb2O5 microcolumns spanning a size range of 50 to 610 nm were synthesized utilizing a cost-effective hydrothermal process (maintained at 180 °C for 30 min), followed by a subsequent calcination step at 500 °C for 3 h. Raman spectroscopy analysis unveiled three distinct reflection peaks at 220.04 cm−1, 602.01 cm−1, and 735.3 cm−1, indicative of the pseudohexagonal crystal lattice of Nb2O5. The HRTEM characterization confirmed the inter-lattice distance of 1.8 Å for the 110 plain and 3.17 Å for the 100 plain. The conductometry sensors were fabricated by drop-casting a dispersion of Nb2O5 microcolumns, in ethanol, on Pt electrodes. The fabricated sensors exhibited excellent selectivity in detecting C2H5OH (ΔG/G = 2.51 for 10 ppm C2H5OH) when compared to a variety of tested gases, including CO, CO2, NO2, H2, H2S, and C3H6O. The optimal operating temperature for this selective detection was determined to be 500 °C in a dry air environment. Moreover, the sensors demonstrated exceptional repeatability over the course of three testing cycles and displayed strong humidity resistance, even when exposed to 90% relative humidity. This excellent humidity resistance gas sensing property can be attributed to their nanoporous nature and elevated operating temperature. Full article
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18 pages, 5856 KiB  
Article
Peptide-Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Chemiresistors: The Effect of Nanotube Density on Gas Sensing
by Daniel Sim, Tiffany Huang and Steve S. Kim
Sensors 2023, 23(20), 8469; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23208469 - 14 Oct 2023
Viewed by 964
Abstract
Biorecognition element (BRE)-based carbon nanotube (CNT) chemiresistors have tremendous potential to serve as highly sensitive, selective, and power-efficient volatile organic compound (VOC) sensors. While many research groups have studied BRE-functionalized CNTs in material science and device development, little attention has been paid to [...] Read more.
Biorecognition element (BRE)-based carbon nanotube (CNT) chemiresistors have tremendous potential to serve as highly sensitive, selective, and power-efficient volatile organic compound (VOC) sensors. While many research groups have studied BRE-functionalized CNTs in material science and device development, little attention has been paid to optimizing CNT density to improve chemiresistor performance. To probe the effect of CNT density on VOC detection, we present the chemiresistor-based sensing results from two peptide-based CNT devices counting more than 60 different individual measurements. We find that a lower CNT density shows a significantly higher noise level and device-to-device variation while exhibiting mildly better sensitivity. Further investigation with SEM images suggests that moderately high CNT density with a stable connection of the nanotube network is desirable to achieve the best signal-to-noise ratio. Our results show an essential design guideline for tuning the nanotube density to provide sensitive and stable chemiresistors. Full article
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