Recent Trends in Resources considering Sustainability, Economy, and Corporate Social Responsibility

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2023) | Viewed by 19431

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Operations Research and Business Intelligence, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: sustainable development; diversity; sustainable education; corporate social responsibility; resources management; renewable energy sources; mining industry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland
2. Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 708-00 Ostrava, Czech Republic
Interests: signal analysis; advanced signal processing methods; renewable energy; ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is intended as a forum for advancing research concerning resources in point of sustainable development, economy and corporate social responsibility. As the range of resources such as natural resources, energy and water resources, mineral and geo-resources, it is necessary to address the different research gaps. Under this special issue the deep scientific discussion will be performed in light of sustainable resources management; economy-related research about resources; resource governance and policy; recent research trends in energy sources; corporate social responsibility from both customers and producers of resources-based sectors. Submissions may concern, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Achieve sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources
  • Sustainable water and energy policy
  • Sustainable consumption in light of resources
  • Economy-based resources allocation
  • Economy against sustainability in resources management
  • Mineral extraction policy
  • Resource governance and policy
  • Clean Energy
  • Renewable and non-renewable energy resources
  • Corporate social responsibility in non-renewable resource-based communities
  • Corporate social responsibility of resources-based sectors

Dr. Elzbieta Jasinska
Prof. Dr. Zbigniew Leonowicz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable resources management
  • sustainable development
  • resource governance and policy
  • water and energy policy
  • extraction policy
  • economy-based resources allocation
  • corporate social responsibility

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

25 pages, 5588 KiB  
Article
Dynamic Capabilities: Unveiling Key Resources for Environmental Sustainability and Economic Sustainability, and Corporate Social Responsibility towards Sustainable Development Goals
by Jacqueline de Almeida Barbosa Franco, Ary Franco Junior, Rosane Aparecida Gomes Battistelle and Barbara Stolte Bezerra
Resources 2024, 13(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources13020022 - 1 Feb 2024
Viewed by 2403
Abstract
This paper examines the role of dynamic capabilities as resources for achieving environmental sustainability, economic sustainability, and corporate social responsibility within the pillars of the Sustainable Development Goals. Economic growth and technological progress, while driving societal advancements, have also contributed to challenges such [...] Read more.
This paper examines the role of dynamic capabilities as resources for achieving environmental sustainability, economic sustainability, and corporate social responsibility within the pillars of the Sustainable Development Goals. Economic growth and technological progress, while driving societal advancements, have also contributed to challenges such as inefficient resource utilization, social inequality, climate change, and unsustainable production. Through an integrative review, the paper identifies sixteen dynamic capabilities incorporated into a business framework. These capabilities aim to support environmental and economic sustainability, along with corporate social responsibility in line with the Sustainable Development Goals. The paper emphasizes opportunities for companies and academia to adopt sustainable practices. This contribution aims to advance the broader objective of sustainable development by promoting a balance between societal progress and responsible resource management. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 3729 KiB  
Article
Inter-Sectoral Economic Linkages in the Mining Industries of Botswana and Tanzania: Analysis Using Partial Hypothetical Extraction Method
by Fitsum Semere Weldegiorgis, Evelyn Dietsche and Shabbir Ahmad
Resources 2023, 12(7), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources12070078 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3034
Abstract
Fiscal and local content policies aimed at promoting linkages between mining and other economic sectors have been informed by theories built on historical observations dating back to the 1950s. This paper contends that there is a need to rethink theories about mining-based economic [...] Read more.
Fiscal and local content policies aimed at promoting linkages between mining and other economic sectors have been informed by theories built on historical observations dating back to the 1950s. This paper contends that there is a need to rethink theories about mining-based economic linkages and the prospects for structural change based on an improved understanding of existing and potential inter-sectoral linkages. Using the input–output tables for Tanzania and Botswana, we apply the Partial Hypothetical Extraction Method within the Leontief and Gosh input–output frameworks to examine the linkages between the mining and quarrying sector and other economic sectors within these two economies. We find that, for Botswana, possible linkage pathways lie in scaling-up coal, soda ash and salt mining and investing in glass, polymer, and chemicals manufacturing. For Tanzania, opportunities for linkage pathways lie with the mining and manufacturing of non-metallic and construction materials as well as metallic minerals and natural gas. For both countries, the prospects for transforming their economies away from a heavy reliance on mineral extraction hinges on leveraging extractives for infrastructure, innovative technology, and technical skills, as well as capturing business opportunities, knowledge, and financial returns to invest in more diversified economic activities. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1575 KiB  
Article
Public Administration and Landowners Facing Real Estate Cadastre Modernization: A Win-Lose or Win-Win Situation?
by Malgorzata Busko and Michal Apollo
Resources 2023, 12(6), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources12060073 - 20 Jun 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1968
Abstract
Keeping the real estate cadastre’s database up to date is a very important process. The scope of the modernization works includes, among other things, fieldwork and office (chamber) work carried out by surveyors to update information about land and buildings. Therefore, modernization may [...] Read more.
Keeping the real estate cadastre’s database up to date is a very important process. The scope of the modernization works includes, among other things, fieldwork and office (chamber) work carried out by surveyors to update information about land and buildings. Therefore, modernization may result in changes to plot areas; changes to the marking of plots and land use (and, consequently, a change in the property tax); and the disclosure or deletion of buildings and premises, as well as changes to their technical data. The research, based on a case study (rural municipality Serniki, Poland), and supported by a literature review, remote sensing, and digital photogrammetry, clearly showed the importance of initiating the cadastre modernization procedure and obtaining funds for this purpose, which will be beneficial for both parties. Landowners will gain by bringing the current image of their real estate closer to the actual state (e.g., by paying taxes for the real utility of the land), while administrative units will become the beneficiaries of higher tax revenues (up to over 500%). Thus, the analysis carried out on the case study shows positive effects for both parties, and justifies the financial outlay incurred by the administrative units for this process. Moreover, the analysis revealed that, due to the possibility of obtaining funding from other sources, the cost to the public administration may be marginal. Thus, the cadastre modernization procedure should be integrated into regional and national policies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 1878 KiB  
Article
Guidelines for the Technical Sustainability Evaluation of the Urban Drinking Water Systems Based on Analytic Hierarchy Process
by Rukhshanda Rehman, Muhammad Sagheer Aslam, Elżbieta Jasińska, Muhammad Faisal Javed and Miroslava Goňo
Resources 2023, 12(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources12010008 - 3 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2043
Abstract
The challenge of achieving and measuring urban water sustainability is hard because of its complex nature. The sustainability of urban drinking water system (UDWS) is no exception, as integration of technical, environmental, social, economic, and institutional elements of sustainability is defying and perplexing [...] Read more.
The challenge of achieving and measuring urban water sustainability is hard because of its complex nature. The sustainability of urban drinking water system (UDWS) is no exception, as integration of technical, environmental, social, economic, and institutional elements of sustainability is defying and perplexing in terms of its application and evaluation. This paper deals with the technical aspects related to the design, construction, operation, and maintenance factors of a UDWS. Measurement of the status of such factors is almost impossible in generic formats. Therefore, a list of measurable sub factors was developed through an extensive literature survey and refined by involving appropriate stakeholders. This led to the development of a hierarchy from criteria to factors and from factors to sub factors, making a case for the utilization of an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) for multicriteria analysis (MCA). Appropriate stakeholders were included in this research to address the issues for which there were major gaps in the literature. A set of guidelines were developed for the evaluation of the status of various sub factors in a quantitative format. It is concluded that a trans disciplinary framework, the involvement of stakeholders, and guidelines for adopting appropriate processes and techniques may improve the sustainability of stressed urban water systems. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 5572 KiB  
Article
Modelling Hazard for Tailings Dam Failures at Copper Mines in Global Supply Chains
by Sören Lars Nungesser and Stefan Pauliuk
Resources 2022, 11(10), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources11100095 - 18 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2918
Abstract
The global mining industry generates several billion tons of waste every year. Much of it is stored in liquid form, known as tailings, in large impoundments. Recent dam failures at tailing ponds with catastrophic outcomes have raised public concern, such that industry initiatives [...] Read more.
The global mining industry generates several billion tons of waste every year. Much of it is stored in liquid form, known as tailings, in large impoundments. Recent dam failures at tailing ponds with catastrophic outcomes have raised public concern, such that industry initiatives and investors are beginning to address the problem. So far, a lack of publicly available data makes an independent and comprehensive risk assessment challenging. We introduce a simple and transparent hazard indicator built from environmental proxy variables and screen a global sample of 112 copper mines for natural hazards regarding tailings dams. In a second step, material footprints of copper for the European Union and five major economies are estimated and compared using a Multi-Regional Input–Output model, shedding light on the regions of origin. Finally, hazard scores are linked to regional copper footprints to identify hotspots in supply chains of final consumption. The most hazardous mines are located in Chile and Peru including some of the world’s largest copper producers. China and the US have the largest copper ore footprints and per capita values in the US were 25 times larger than in India. The United States’ and European footprints are satisfied by domestic extraction to about 66 and 40 percent respectively. Copper from Poland contributes around 19 and 28 percent to supply chains of German and European final demand respectively and, as a consequence, Poland constitutes the main hazard hotspot for Europe’s copper supply chain. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

29 pages, 16686 KiB  
Review
Structural Performance of Waste Plastic Bottles Modified Asphalt: A Review
by Abdul Muqeet Shah, Rida Hameed Lodhi, Muhammad Faisal Javed, Michał Jasiński, Elżbieta Jasińska and Miroslava Gono
Resources 2023, 12(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources12010010 - 6 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3880
Abstract
The usage of plastic materials in our daily life is increasing day by day. These plastic materials are somehow beneficial for us, but the disposal of waste plastic materials has become a serious problem. The use of plastic not only enhances road construction [...] Read more.
The usage of plastic materials in our daily life is increasing day by day. These plastic materials are somehow beneficial for us, but the disposal of waste plastic materials has become a serious problem. The use of plastic not only enhances road construction but also helps extend the life of roads and improves the environment. Waste plastics use in roads increases durability and also reduces water retention. This research reviews the use of waste plastics in asphalt pavement. In this study, the properties such as Marshall stability, flow, resilient modulus, fatigue, etc., are studied to boost the usage of waste plastic in asphalt pavements. It is concluded that with the use of waste plastic in asphalt pavement, the quality of roads will be enhanced, and it will also be very beneficial for our environment. The other major advantage is that it will be very cost-effective for underdeveloped countries. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

14 pages, 1008 KiB  
Concept Paper
An Approach to Assess the Water Resources Reliability and Its Management
by Jakub Żywiec, Dawid Szpak, Izabela Piegdoń, Krzysztof Boryczko, Katarzyna Pietrucha-Urbanik, Barbara Tchórzewska-Cieślak and Janusz Rak
Resources 2023, 12(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources12010004 - 3 Jan 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2079
Abstract
One of the factors limiting the possibility of the development of urban agglomerations is access to drinking water. Due to progressive climate change, the available water resources are limited. The paper proposes new indicators of limiting the development of agglomerations related to the [...] Read more.
One of the factors limiting the possibility of the development of urban agglomerations is access to drinking water. Due to progressive climate change, the available water resources are limited. The paper proposes new indicators of limiting the development of agglomerations related to the availability of water resources and the production capacity of water treatment plants, a method for assessing the diversification of water resources (using the Pielou index), and a water loss balance was prepared based on International Water Association (IWA) standards. On the basis of the obtained results, the potential increase in the number of inhabitants indicators (∆PR, ∆PP) and the time for the development of agglomeration indicators (TR, TP), the directions of development of the studied agglomerations in terms of the possibility of water supply were indicated. The main problems were reducing the amount of water losses, appropriate management of the migration policy of the population, and the necessity to look for alternative sources of water. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop