Special Issue "Natural Resource Management and Sustainable Development Goals"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Katharine N. Farrell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Associated Fellow & Coordination Team Member, Berlin Workshop in Institutional Analysis of Social-Ecological Systems, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany
2. Investigadora Vinculat, L'Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès (Barcelona), Spain
Prof. Dr. Konrad Hagedorn
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Senior Professor, Department of Agricultural, Steering Group Leader, Berlin Workshop in Institutional Analysis of Social-Ecological Systems, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Starting with the first United Nations (UN) Human Development Report, in 1998, which included five human development goals, questions regarding how the allocation and distribution of the world’s resources are related to human well-being have gained increasing international attention. With the adoption of the Millennium Development Goals, in 2000, the scope was expanded to include the environment and, in 2015, the centrality of human–environment relations to ensuring human well-being was recognized with the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In mainstream economic analyses, the matters of concern raised in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals—e.g. poverty, hunger, injustice, environmental impacts—are typically addressed in terms of the relationship between general welfare, social costs and sustainability; in discourses critiquing colonialist development they are addressed in terms of the capacity to control access to and the allocation and distribution of the world’s resources; both lie at the heart of the Latin American discourse on Living Well (Sumak Kawsay). In all cases, these questions are intimately bound up with how economic life is organized by human communities through their institutions. In this Special Issue, we aim to open up a space for constructive and critical debate regarding the institutional economic implications of the Sustainable Development Goals and concerning their potential and limitations as a vehicle to foster generalized human well-being. We invite contributions concerning three general thematic areas: Supply and Demand for Resources and the SDGs; Challenges for the Study of Resource Management in the Context of the SDGs; and Regulation and Governance of Resource Use under the SDGs.

Dr. Katharine N. Farrell
Prof. Dr. Konrad Hagedorn
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • The Sustainable Development Goals
  • Institutional Economics
  • Incentives
  • Regulation
  • Cooperation
  • Conflict

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Assessment of Policy Integration of Sustainable Consumption and Production into National Policies
Resources 2017, 6(4), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6040048 - 22 Sep 2017
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 5257
Abstract
Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP) was adopted as a stand-alone goal and reflected as one of the cross-cutting objectives of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with a central role to address global resource consumption and its associated environmental impacts, as well as numerous [...] Read more.
Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP) was adopted as a stand-alone goal and reflected as one of the cross-cutting objectives of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with a central role to address global resource consumption and its associated environmental impacts, as well as numerous social and economic issues. With this broad characterization of SCP, policy integration is crucial in addressing it at national level. This paper analyzes characteristics of SCP policy integration based on a survey of national government policies. It reveals that SCP is not fully integrated in national policy-making; high resource consumption sectors such as urban planning, building, and tourism are not fully incorporated into national SCP policies, and there is only limited participation of relevant government ministries other than environment ministries. We find that among countries with horizontal policy integration, those with Green Economy/Green Growth frameworks tend to have better sectoral integration; and those with SCP-specific frameworks are likely to have broader coordination of ministries. By conducting cross-analysis using income level and region, the different characteristics of SCP policy-making approaches were identified. The results of this study provide a better understanding of how SCP is integrated into policy for effective national policy-making and measurement of the SDG Goal 12. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management and Sustainable Development Goals)
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Article
Is Sustainable Intensification Pro-Poor? Evidence from Small-Scale Farmers in Rural Tanzania
Resources 2017, 6(3), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6030047 - 15 Sep 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4294
Abstract
The transition of farming systems to higher levels of productivity without overusing natural resources is of rising interest especially in African countries, where population growth has often been larger than past productivity increases. This paper aims to contribute to the debate on whether [...] Read more.
The transition of farming systems to higher levels of productivity without overusing natural resources is of rising interest especially in African countries, where population growth has often been larger than past productivity increases. This paper aims to contribute to the debate on whether environmentally friendly agricultural practices are compatible with economic interests. In the context of small-scale farm households in Tanzania, the analysis focuses on Conservation Agriculture (CA) at different levels of agricultural output, as CA is a promising toolbox for sustainable intensification. The results are based on a household survey conducted in 2014 with 900 randomly selected small-scale farmers in rural Tanzania, i.e., in semi-arid Dodoma and in semi-humid Morogoro region. We find that mulching is most frequently applied, followed by crop rotation, fallowing, intercropping and tree planting. Logit regressions show that CA adoption is influenced by socio-economic factors, farm characteristics and the regional context. Quantile regressions explain different levels of agricultural output through variables related to the extent of using CA. They indicate that marginalized farmers have the strongest crop income effect from an increased use of mulching. With increasing levels of agricultural output, the use of mulching remains beneficial for farmers, but the effect appears less pronounced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management and Sustainable Development Goals)
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Article
Rules of Engagement: A Review of Regulatory Instruments Designed to Promote and Secure Local Content Requirements in the Oil and Gas Sector
Resources 2017, 6(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6030046 - 06 Sep 2017
Viewed by 3462
Abstract
Regulatory interventions, such as Local Content (LC) requirements, have been incorporated to counter market forces to maximise petroleum revenues. This has been undertaken with the hypothesis that the governments of petroleum-producing countries depend heavily on petroleum sectors for development, yet energy markets inadequately [...] Read more.
Regulatory interventions, such as Local Content (LC) requirements, have been incorporated to counter market forces to maximise petroleum revenues. This has been undertaken with the hypothesis that the governments of petroleum-producing countries depend heavily on petroleum sectors for development, yet energy markets inadequately allocate these resources. Thus, governments revise existing, and often out-of-date, petroleum laws and introduce new petroleum legislation to specifically promote socio-economic objectives. This article explores the key legislative instruments of LC as developed and implemented in the oil and gas sectors both from developed and developing countries’ perspectives. In assessing the overall policy approach, this article evaluates instruments used to secure Local Content requirements in the oil and gas industry. In conclusion, governments must identify appropriate frameworks that consider the political and regulatory challenge of striking a balance between incentivising upstream investors and fulfilling national interests, such as creating jobs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management and Sustainable Development Goals)
Article
Modeling Cross-Border Regions, Place-Making, and Resource Management: A Delphi Analysis
Resources 2017, 6(3), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6030032 - 21 Jul 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3522
Abstract
Along international borders, spillover of resource management issues is a growing challenge. Development of cross-border regions (CBRs) is seen as an emerging means of addressing these issues. A set of theoretical models, geo-economic mobilization and a resource-focused territorial program of place-making have been [...] Read more.
Along international borders, spillover of resource management issues is a growing challenge. Development of cross-border regions (CBRs) is seen as an emerging means of addressing these issues. A set of theoretical models, geo-economic mobilization and a resource-focused territorial program of place-making have been proposed as a lens for understanding why such change could occur. From this theory, we identify three C’s as critical initial or necessary conditions to start the process: common territorial identity, convergence of knowledge and values, willingness for cooperation. We then utilize results of a Delphi study in the Fraser Lowland, a sub-district of the American-Canadian Cascadia borderland, to test if these three are present and actively working together. Our analysis based on both cumulative logit and mixed-effect modeling confirms the active existence of the three C’s demonstrating the value of these theoretical models. However, the Delphi also shows that not all in this region are convinced of cross-border convergence and case studies provide mixed signals of successful cross-border resource management, indicating that sufficient conditions are yet to be fully met. Thus, our results confirm the value of these models as a lens to view events, but leave many questions to be researched. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management and Sustainable Development Goals)
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