Special Issue "Impacts of Climatic Variability on Terrestrial Ecosystems and Resources"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alisher Mirzabaev
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Development Reserach (ZEF), University of Bonn, Germany
Interests: economics of land degradation; desertification; climate change impacts and adaptation; bioeconomy; decentralized energy; water–energy–food security nexus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleageus,

Increasing climatic variability under climate change will affect the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems in numerous ways, with significant socio-economic impacts. This Special Issue seeks to explore the effects of climatic variability on land ecosystem services and their implications for societies and people. The Special Issue particularly focuses on themes such as interactions between climatic variability and soil/land degradation, joint impacts of climatic variability and land degradation on crop and livestock productivity, non-provisioning ecosystem services, particularly carbon sequestration, the implications of these interactions for poverty, food security and the livelihoods of smallholder agricultural and pastoral producers, especially in the developing countries. Articles exploring the role of adaptation measures against increasing climatic variability based on sustainable land management are also highly encouraged for submission to this Special Issue.

Dr. Alisher Mirzabaev
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climatic variability
  • Land and soil degradation
  • Sustainable land management
  • Socio-economic consequences
  • Poverty
  • Food security
  • Crop and livestock production
  • Carbon sequestration
  • Rangelands
  • Forests
  • Pastoral communities
  • Acess to land resources

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Perceived Changes in Ecosystem Services in the Panchase Mountain Ecological Region, Nepal
Resources 2019, 8(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8010004 - 29 Dec 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2458
Abstract
Ecosystem services (ES) are increasingly recognized as a means to facilitate adaption to environmental change. However, the provisions of ES are likely to be impacted by changes in climate and/or changes in land use. In developing countries, where people are typically dependent on [...] Read more.
Ecosystem services (ES) are increasingly recognized as a means to facilitate adaption to environmental change. However, the provisions of ES are likely to be impacted by changes in climate and/or changes in land use. In developing countries, where people are typically dependent on these services for their livelihoods, these impacts are of concern; however, very little is known about the changes in provisioning of ES over time. In this study, we assess the perceived changes on ES in the Panchase Mountain Ecological Region of western Nepal. The study area accommodates three distinct ecoregions, ranging from lowland to upland ecosystems and communities. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews were used to collect information on how ES may have changed in the landscape over time. This approach was supported by transect walks, field observations, and secondary sources of information, such as climatic and remote sensing data. Perceived changes on ES in the study region include reduced availability of water, reduced food production, degradation of forest ecosystems, and changes in species compositions. These changes are thought to have impacted other ES, and, in turn, local livelihoods. Management actions that can help local communities foster ES are recommended. Full article
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Article
Assessing the Impacts of Climate Change on Distribution of Major Non-Timber Forest Plants in Chitwan Annapurna Landscape, Nepal
Resources 2018, 7(4), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7040066 - 23 Oct 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2334
Abstract
For many decades, non-timber forest products (NTFPs) have been an important livelihood commodity in Nepal as a traditional source of food, fiber, and medicines. However, the importance of NTFPs have been recognized only recently. NTFPs form more than 5% of Nepal’s national gross [...] Read more.
For many decades, non-timber forest products (NTFPs) have been an important livelihood commodity in Nepal as a traditional source of food, fiber, and medicines. However, the importance of NTFPs have been recognized only recently. NTFPs form more than 5% of Nepal’s national gross domestic product and are facing threat due to anthropogenic drivers and changing climate. Understanding of the current distribution and future dynamics of NTFPs is essential for effective conservation planning and management. In the maiden attempt, we used the Maxent model to understand the current and predict the future distribution by 2050 of 10 major NTFPs in Chitwan Annapurna Landscape, Nepal. The prediction accuracy of the models calculated based on the area under curve was high (>90%) and the prediction by 2050 highlights potential increase in distribution range of seven NTFPs and potential decrease in that of three NTFPs in the study area. The results from our study could play an important role in planning and management of these NTFPs considering their high economic and ecological significance and sensitivity to predicted climate change. Full article
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