Special Issue "Terrestrial Remote Sensing of Hazards and Landforms in Forests and Agricultural Environments"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2022 | Viewed by 1860

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Martina Slámová
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dep. of Landscape Planning and Design, Faculty of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Technical University in Zvolen, 960 01 Zvolen, Slovakia
Interests: terrestrial remote sensing; innovative outdoor positioning technologies; historical landforms; natural hazards; land cover; digital models; QGIS; spatial planning
Dr. Martin Mokroš
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, 165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: terrestrial photogrammetry; UAV photogrammetry; terrestrial laser scanning; remote sensing; forest; forestry
Dr. Grazia Tucci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dep. of Civil and Environmental Engineering (DICEA), University of Florence, 3 – 50139 Firenze, Italy
Interests: geomatics; laser scanner; photogrammetry; GIS/BIM; landscape; Built Heritage
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonio Santoro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI), University of Florence, 50145 Firenze, Italy
Interests: rural landscape; agricultural heritage; cultural landscape; agroforestry; GIAHS; sustainable forest management
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Dr. Martina Venturi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dep. of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI), University of Florence, 18-50145 Florence, Italy
Interests: landscape planning; agricultural heritage; forest management; agrosilvopastoral traditional systems
Dr. Csaba Centeri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nature Conservation and Landscape Management, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, H-2100 Gödöllő, Hungary
Interests: ecosystem services; soil-related ecosystem services; soil erosion; land use change; nature conservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human activities leave ineffaceable traces in the environment. Mankind can learn from the environmental degradation caused by the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as from the wisdom and endeavours of ancestors who originated sophisticated constructions delivering benefits to human society and natural environment (irrigation systems, terraces, etc.). Human-induced hazards pose a daily risk to man-made properties, but they often remain unrecognized as hidden threats in forests.

Forested areas limit the use of remote sensing technologies. Dense vegetation floor and terrain constraints often cause the inaccessibility of the study site for aerial survey. Hence, terrestrial remote sensing technologies turn out to be an appropriate tool for gathering supplementary or missing data. Therefore, studies bringing a novelty to the mapping and monitoring of human-induced hazards and historical landforms within forest using terrestrial/mobile photogrammetry or laser scanning and other wearable reality capture systems providing accurate data are particularly welcome. Due to insufficient Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal transmission in forests, inventories using technologies integrating GNSS with Inertial Measurement Unit (IME), and simultaneous positioning and mapping algorithm (SLAM), or other novel approaches are also welcome. Furthermore, innovative ways for the fusion of terrestrial remote sensing methods with aerial or satellite data to improve the monitoring and mapping of human-induced hazards are another focus area of this special issue.

Human-induced hazards and historical landforms related to agricultural activities are of a prior interest. Nevertheless, the special issue is opened to all studies dealing with human-induced hazards and landforms in forests and extensively used agricultural environments (currently covered with successive vegetation). Their fast and low-cost detection has a high priority in territorial planning and decision-making processes.

Dr. Martina Slámová
Dr. Martin Mokroš
Dr. Grazia Tucci
Dr. Antonio Santoro
Dr. Martina Venturi
Dr. Csaba Centeri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human-induced hazards
  • landforms
  • dense vegetation
  • wearable reality capture systems
  • terrestrial laser scanning
  • close-range photogrammetry

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Observation of Diurnal Ground Surface Changes Due to Freeze-Thaw Action by Real-Time Kinematic Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(11), 2167; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13112167 - 01 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1059
Abstract
Ground surface changes caused by freeze-thaw action affect agriculture and forestry, as well as artificial structures such as roads. In this study, an area is examined in which reforestation is urgently needed but the growth of naturally restored seedlings and planted trees is [...] Read more.
Ground surface changes caused by freeze-thaw action affect agriculture and forestry, as well as artificial structures such as roads. In this study, an area is examined in which reforestation is urgently needed but the growth of naturally restored seedlings and planted trees is impaired by freeze-thaw action. Thus, a method of measuring freeze-thaw induced ground surface changes and mitigating their negative impacts is needed. Real-time kinematic unmanned aerial vehicle and structure-from-motion multiview stereophotogrammetry are used on slope-failure sites in forest areas to observe the ground surface changes caused by freeze-thaw action over a wide area, in a nondestructive manner. The slope characteristics influencing the ground-surface changes were examined, and it was confirmed that it is possible to observe minute topographical changes of less than ±5 cm resulting from freeze-thaw action. Statistical models show that the amount of freeze-thaw action is mostly linked to the cumulative solar radiation, daily ground-surface temperature range, and topographic-wetness index, which influence the microscale dynamics of the ground surface. The proposed method will be useful for future quantitative assessments of ground-surface conditions. Further, efficient reforestation could be implemented by considering the effects of the factors identified on the amount of freeze-thaw action. Full article
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