Special Issue "Earth Observation and Sustainable Development in Marine and Freshwater Systems"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Trevor Platt
Website
Guest Editor
Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth PL1 3DH, UK
Interests: the physiological ecology of marine phytoplankton; structure and function of the marine ecosystem; submarine optics; remote sensing of ocean colour; the ocean carbon cycle and climate change, and the ecological approach to fisheries management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Shubha Sathyendranath
Website
Guest Editor
Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth PL1 3DH, UK
Interests: ocean colour modelling; spectral characteristics of light penetration underwater; bio-optical properties of phytoplankton; modelling primary production; bio-geochemical cycles in the sea; climate change; biological–physical interactions in the marine system; ecological provinces in the sea; ecological indicators and phytoplankton functional types
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Christine Gommenginger
Website
Guest Editor
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK
Interests: microwave ocean remote sensing; ocean winds and waves; coastal sea level; wind/wave/current interactions; submesoscale ocean dynamics; ocean currents in coastal, shelf and polar seas; sea surface salinity and freshwater fluxes
Dr. Marie-Fanny Racault
Website
Guest Editor
Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth PL1 3DH, United Kingdom
Interests: marine ecosystem dynamics; climate change impacts, risks, opportunities and trade-offs; ocean-colour remote sensing; EO applications for aquatic-system health-risk assessment; ecology of microbial pathogens
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Craig Baker-Austin
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft, UK
Interests: marine microbiology; vibrios; climate changes; waterborne infectious disease; biological oceanography; human pathogens
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gina Tsarouchi
Website
Guest Editor
Flood and Water Management Group, HR Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BA, United Kingdom
Interests: Hydrology, water resources, early warning systems, droughts, floods, earth observation applications for sustainable development, dengue fever and other vector-borne infectious diseases, climate change impact assessments, land-surface modelling, land-use change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The United Nations has issued a series of seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) intended to increase the welfare of the world’s citizens by the year 2030. EO technologies and innovations are constantly evolving, and can help enhance the capability to monitor the Earth’s vital resources, and to support the planning, design, operation, and management processes of various sectors.

This Special Issue invites contributions demonstrating how EO technologies provide the information needed to confront key sustainable development challenges, spanning a whole range of themes such as: marine and freshwater systems, disaster response and early warning systems, water resources, agriculture, deforestation, land-use change, urban development, and health.

SDGs that are of particular interest include:

  • SDG 14 – Life below water
  • SDG 3 – Good health and wellbeing
  • SDG 6 – Clean water and sanitation

The Special Issue will include contributions that address the power of Earth observation to support our ability to address issues related to these SDGs. Examples include remotely-sensed metrics of marine ecosystem status, fishery potential estimated using ocean-colour data, surveillance for governance on the high seas, early warning systems for floods and droughts, approaches for monitoring land cover change and so on.  

The scope is very broad. It will also include papers that deal with other SDGs that have an aquatic context. For example water-associated diseases impinge on SDG 3 (health) and on SDG 6 (clean water) as well as on SDG 14. Papers on applications of remote sensing to study water-associated diseases would therefore be welcome contributions to the Special Issue. There are many other such cross-cutting topics that could be contributed to the Special Issue. The SDGs, as well the related targets and indicators, can be found at

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300

Prof. Trevor Platt
Dr. Shubha Sathyendranath
Dr. Christine Gommenginger
Dr. Marie-Fanny Racault
Dr. Craig Baker-Austin
Dr. Gina Tsarouchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • remote sensing
  • sustainable development
  • marine
  • brackish
  • freshwater
  • coastal
  • marine protected areas
  • fisheries
  • human health
  • clean water
  • climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Contribution of Remote Sensing Technologies to a Holistic Coastal and Marine Environmental Management Framework: A Review
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(14), 2313; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12142313 - 18 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2185
Abstract
Coastal and marine management require the evaluation of multiple environmental threats and issues. However, there are gaps in the necessary data and poor access or dissemination of existing data in many countries around the world. This research identifies how remote sensing can contribute [...] Read more.
Coastal and marine management require the evaluation of multiple environmental threats and issues. However, there are gaps in the necessary data and poor access or dissemination of existing data in many countries around the world. This research identifies how remote sensing can contribute to filling these gaps so that environmental agencies, such as the United Nations Environmental Programme, European Environmental Agency, and International Union for Conservation of Nature, can better implement environmental directives in a cost-effective manner. Remote sensing (RS) techniques generally allow for uniform data collection, with common acquisition and reporting methods, across large areas. Furthermore, these datasets are sometimes open-source, mainly when governments finance satellite missions. Some of these data can be used in holistic, coastal and marine environmental management frameworks, such as the DAPSI(W)R(M) framework (Drivers–Activities–Pressures–State changes–Impacts (on Welfare)–Responses (as Measures), an updated version of Drivers–Pressures–State–Impact–Responses. The framework is a useful and holistic problem-structuring framework that can be used to assess the causes, consequences, and responses to change in the marine environment. Six broad classifications of remote data collection technologies are reviewed for their potential contribution to integrated marine management, including Satellite-based Remote Sensing, Aerial Remote Sensing, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Unmanned Surface Vehicles, Unmanned Underwater Vehicles, and Static Sensors. A significant outcome of this study is practical inputs into each component of the DAPSI(W)R(M) framework. The RS applications are not expected to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide insight into the current use of the framework as a foundation for developing further holistic resource technologies for management strategies in the future. A significant outcome of this research will deliver practical insights for integrated coastal and marine management and demonstrate the usefulness of RS to support the implementation of environmental goals, descriptors, targets, and policies, such as the Water Framework Directive, Marine Strategy Framework Directive, Ocean Health Index, and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Additionally, the opportunities and challenges of these technologies are discussed. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Environmental Reservoirs of Vibrio cholerae: Challenges and Opportunities for Ocean-Color Remote Sensing
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(23), 2763; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11232763 - 24 Nov 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1791
Abstract
The World Health Organization has estimated the burden of the on-going pandemic of cholera at 1.3 to 4 million cases per year worldwide in 2016, and a doubling of case-fatality-rate to 1.8% in 2016 from 0.8% in 2015. The disease cholera is caused [...] Read more.
The World Health Organization has estimated the burden of the on-going pandemic of cholera at 1.3 to 4 million cases per year worldwide in 2016, and a doubling of case-fatality-rate to 1.8% in 2016 from 0.8% in 2015. The disease cholera is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae that can be found in environmental reservoirs, living either in free planktonic form or in association with host organisms, non-living particulate matter or in the sediment, and participating in various biogeochemical cycles. An increasing number of epidemiological studies are using land- and water-based remote-sensing observations for monitoring, surveillance, or risk mapping of Vibrio pathogens and cholera outbreaks. Although the Vibrio pathogens cannot be sensed directly by satellite sensors, remotely-sensed data can be used to infer their presence. Here, we review the use of ocean-color remote-sensing data, in conjunction with information on the ecology of the pathogen, to map its distribution and forecast risk of disease occurrence. Finally, we assess how satellite-based information on cholera may help support the Sustainable Development Goals and targets on Health (Goal 3), Water Quality (Goal 6), Climate (Goal 13), and Life Below Water (Goal 14). Full article
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