Special Issue "Titles, Paratexts, and Manuscript Communication: Jewish and Christian Literature in Material Context"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2022 | Viewed by 1336

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Garrick V. Allen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
Interests: apocalyptic literature; early Judaism; manuscripts studies; New Testament; textual transmission
Dr. Kelsie G. Rodenbiker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, U.K
Interests: canonicity; exemplarity; manuscript studies; Catholic Epistles; early Judaism; intertraditionality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Paratexts (e.g., inscriptions and subscriptions, coronides and illustrations, colophons, and corrections) offer a rich body of information embedded within manuscripts that is not immediately available to scholars who engage these traditions through the medium of the critical edition. As manuscripts containing the works of the New Testament have often been put to use to reconstruct an “original” text, this crucial paratextual content has not always been valued beyond text-critical reconstruction—or has been devalued as “misinformation.” The purpose of this Special Issue is to examine the role that paratextuality plays in the material transmission of early Jewish and Christian literature, extending existing scholarly engagement with these manuscripts by emphasising that paratexts are not just marginal features: They are a crucial aspect in the reception and transmission of these ancient texts.

This Special Issue is directly related to the Titles of the New Testament: A New Approach to Manuscripts and the History of Interpretation (TiNT) project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement n° 847428). As such, we welcome contributions that engage the paratextual features (especially titles and titular formulations in all their forms) of early Jewish and Christian manuscripts. How does titular attribution change over time for a given work? What does this say about how the work was interpreted in a given context? How have certain paratextual features influenced a work’s reception? What implications regarding canonicity and authority can be gleaned from paratextual information? You may choose to narrow your focus to one key feature of a single manuscript or to more broadly analyse a paratextual feature across multiple manuscripts.

Dr. Garrick V. Allen
Dr. Kelsie G. Rodenbiker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • manuscripts
  • history of interpretation
  • paratexts
  • titular traditions
  • textual transmission
  • reception history

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Early Textual Scholarship on Acts: Observations from the Euthalian Quotation Lists
Religions 2022, 13(5), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13050435 - 12 May 2022
Viewed by 297
Abstract
This article examines two aspects of the ubiquitous, but oft-overlooked, set of paratexts known as the Euthalian Apparatus. The Euthalian apparatus supplements Acts, the Pauline Epistles, and the Catholic Epistles in a variety of manuscripts, framing these works with prefaces, cross-references, lists of [...] Read more.
This article examines two aspects of the ubiquitous, but oft-overlooked, set of paratexts known as the Euthalian Apparatus. The Euthalian apparatus supplements Acts, the Pauline Epistles, and the Catholic Epistles in a variety of manuscripts, framing these works with prefaces, cross-references, lists of various kinds, and biographic texts relating to Paul. To begin to understand this variable system as a work of late-ancient textual scholarship, transmitted in hundreds of medieval manuscripts, I examine the two quotation lists provided for Acts, focusing on their various presentations in the manuscripts, using GA 1162 as an example. Examining these lists enables us to better understand the reception of Acts’ use of Jewish scripture, Acts’ reception in late-ancient scholastic contexts, the transmission of quotations, and the complexity involved in defining the boundaries of canonical ideologies. Full article
Article
Arts of Memory, Ancient Manuscript Technologies, and the Aims of Theology
Religions 2022, 13(5), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13050426 - 08 May 2022
Viewed by 359
Abstract
This article explores how ancient rhetorical theories about the improvement of human memory were applied to manuscripts in the form of paratextual ordering systems. It then considers the intellectual implications of these technological changes in the management of textual knowledge. A sequentially ordered [...] Read more.
This article explores how ancient rhetorical theories about the improvement of human memory were applied to manuscripts in the form of paratextual ordering systems. It then considers the intellectual implications of these technological changes in the management of textual knowledge. A sequentially ordered system for dividing textual information into “chapters” or “verses” proved powerful for both mnemonic arts and textual arts. The article next explores a specific example of paratextual technologies in Priscillian of Avila’s fourth-century CE Canones Epistularum Pauli Apostoli, which is one of the most sophisticated cross-referencing systems ever produced prior to printed texts. The article concludes by reflecting on the implications of textual divisions and citation schemes for the work of theology. The test case for this is Priscillian’s “versification” of the Pauline corpus for purposes of textual abstraction (the extraction and reorganization of numerically divided textual parts) in service of theological abstraction (the attempt to create systematic wholes out of the newly reorganized parts). Full article
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