Topical Collection "Intensified Reactors and Smart Integrated Processing for Valuable Products from Food Processing Wastes"

A topical collection in Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This collection belongs to the section "Food Processes".

Editors

Prof. Dr. Volker Hessel
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005, Australia
Interests: micro process technology; flow chemistry; process intensification; green processing; sustainability (life cycle assessment, cost analysis)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Milton Hearn
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Green Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
Interests: bioprocess technologies; separation science; green chemistry
Prof. Dr. Bo Jin
Website
Guest Editor
School Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Australia
Interests: bioprocessing; bioconversion; industrial biotechnology; bionanotechnology; wastewater treatment and reuse

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Growing global population and urbanization has led to increasing demand for food production and processing industries, which generate large amounts of organic wastes. Food processing waste (FPW) is a reservoir of complex carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nutraceuticals, which are rich in carbon and nutrient sources for the production of commercially important metabolites. Effective FPW utilization for the production of renewable energy and valuable chemicals can significantly promote human well being and national economics, and might close the chemical production cycle in a C2C manner.

Keys to a sustainable transformation, with maximised FPW reuse and raised potential income of the entire bioprocess chain, are

  • Food waste sources rich in the key molecular component and of reliable quality
  • Smart and multi-functional catalysts
  • Modern and should be one process concept
  • The integration of process functions: the interconnection of biotechnological processes in the co-production of bio-fuels and bio-products
  • Modular, flexible chemical production platforms, which can run campaigns in a flexible manner.

Recent valorisation studies for food processing waste have opened new avenues for producing biofuels, enzymes, bioactive compounds, biodegradable plastics, and nanoparticles, among many other molecules. This Special Issue deals with the various products and latest valorisation techniques using FPW as a raw material. Biorefinery is an emerging concept in the field of biomass waste-management, suggesting that all kinds of biomass-derived materials can be converted into different types of biofuels and chemicals through various conversion processes with a reduced impact on the environment. Technologies include intelligent separation, biochemical processing, recovery technology, and modelling strategies with high-added-value compounds for commercial applications. Intensified flow chemistry and its reactors provide unchallenged high productivity and selectivity, while modular process equipment containers allow flexible production (switch in charges and campaigns) and have been proven to massively reduce CAPEX/OPEX costs.

Review and research articles focusing on outstanding questions such as those listed below are most welcome:

  • How can waste valorisation strategies be incorporated into the various stages of food processing and logistics?
  • What are the technical hurdles associated with FPW considering its vast diversity?
  • Will the utilization of FPW to produce value-added products be an economically feasible idea?
  • Has the biorefinery concept been truly effective for all forms of food supply chain waste?
  • Is a holistic concept at hand, which integrates all process functions with a vision on final-stage capacity?
  • How can multi-disciplinary innovation be developed towards the commercial processing case?

Prof. Dr. Volker Hessel
Prof. Dr. Milton Hearn
Prof. Dr. Bo Jin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Please note that for papers submitted after 31 December 2019 an APC of 1400 CHF applies. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food processing waste
  • biorefinery
  • biochemical process strategy and modelling
  • intensified reactor
  • and process concepts

Published Papers (3 papers)

2019

Open AccessArticle
Chemically Enhanced Primary Sludge as an Anaerobic Co-Digestion Additive for Biogas Production from Food Waste
Processes 2019, 7(10), 709; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7100709 - 07 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In order to overcome process instability and buffer deficiency in the anaerobic digestion of mono food waste (FW), chemically enhanced primary sludge (CEPS) was selected as a co-substrate for FW treatment. In this study, batch tests were conducted to study the effects of [...] Read more.
In order to overcome process instability and buffer deficiency in the anaerobic digestion of mono food waste (FW), chemically enhanced primary sludge (CEPS) was selected as a co-substrate for FW treatment. In this study, batch tests were conducted to study the effects of CEPS/FW ratios on anaerobic co-digestion (coAD) performances. Both soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and protease activity were decreased, with the CEPS/FW mass ratio increasing from 0:5 to 5:0. However, it was also found that the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was eliminated by increasing the CEPS/FW ratio, and that corresponding VFAs concentrations decreased from 13,872.97 to 1789.98 mg chemical oxygen demand per L (mg COD/L). In addition, the maximum value of cumulative biogas yield (446.39 mL per g volatile solids removal (mL/g VSsremoval)) was observed at a CEPS/FW ratio of 4:1, and that the tendency of coenzyme F420 activity was similar to biogas production. The mechanism analysis indicated that Fe-based CEPS relived the VFAs accumulation caused by FW, and Fe(III) induced by Fe-based CEPS enhanced the activity of F420. Therefore, the addition of Fe-based CEPS provided an alternative method for FW treatment. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Aqueous and Enzymatic Extraction of Oil and Protein from Almond Cake: A Comparative Study
Processes 2019, 7(7), 472; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7070472 - 22 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The almond cake is a protein- and oil-rich by-product of the mechanical expression of almond oil that has the potential to be used as a source of valuable proteins and lipids for food applications. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the [...] Read more.
The almond cake is a protein- and oil-rich by-product of the mechanical expression of almond oil that has the potential to be used as a source of valuable proteins and lipids for food applications. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the individual and combined effects of solids-to-liquid ratio (SLR), reaction time, and enzyme use on oil and protein extraction yields from almond cake. A central composite rotatable design was employed to maximize the overall extractability and distribution of extracted components among the fractions generated by the aqueous (AEP) and enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction process (EAEP). Simultaneous extraction of oil and protein by the AEP was favored by the use of low SLR (1:12.82) and longer reaction times (2 h), where extraction yields of 48.2% and 70% were achieved, respectively. Increased use of enzyme (0.85%) in the EAEP resulted in higher oil (50%) and protein (75%) extraction yields in a shorter reaction time (1 h), compared with the AEP at the same reaction time (41.6% oil and 70% protein extraction). Overall, extraction conditions that favored oil and protein extraction also favored oil yield in the cream and protein yield in the skim. However, increased oil yield in the skim was observed at conditions where higher oil extraction was achieved. In addition to improving oil and protein extractability, the use of enzyme during the extraction resulted in the production of skim fractions with smaller and more soluble peptides at low pH (5.0), highlighting possible uses of the EAEP skim in food applications involving acidic pH. The implications of the use of enzyme during the extraction regarding the de-emulsification of the EAEP cream warrant further investigation. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Lipase Production by Solid-State Cultivation of Thermomyces Lanuginosus on By-Products from Cold-Pressing Oil Production
Processes 2019, 7(7), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7070465 - 19 Jul 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
This study shows that by-products obtained after cold-pressing oil production (flex oil cake, hemp oil cake, hull-less pumpkin oil cake) could be used as substrates for the sustainable and cost-effective production of lipase when cultivating Thermomyces lanuginosus under solid-state conditions (T = [...] Read more.
This study shows that by-products obtained after cold-pressing oil production (flex oil cake, hemp oil cake, hull-less pumpkin oil cake) could be used as substrates for the sustainable and cost-effective production of lipase when cultivating Thermomyces lanuginosus under solid-state conditions (T = 45 °C, t = 9 days). Lipase showed optimum activity at T = 40 °C. The produced lipase extract was purified 17.03-folds with a recovery of 1% after gel chromatography. Three different batch experiments were performed in order to test the possibility of using the lipase in biodiesel production. Experiments were performed with a commercial, unpurified enzyme, and partially purified lipase with sunflower oil and methanol as substrates in a batch reactor at 40 °C. During the experiments, the operational stability of the enzyme was studied. The obtained results clearly showed that produced crude and purified lipase can be used for biodiesel production, but the process needs some additional optimization. As for operation stability, it was noticed that the commercial enzyme was deactivated after 30 h, while produced crude enzyme remained 8.25% of its activity after 368 h. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop