Special Issue "Synthetic Approaches and Applications of Conjugated Polymers"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2021) | Viewed by 5235

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Youngmin Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801, USA
Interests: functional polymeric materials; synthesis and characterization of conjugated polymers; conjugated block copolymers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the Editor of Polymers (MDPI), I am coordinating a special issue entitled “Synthetic Approaches and Applications of Conjugated Polymers.” Last decades, a conjugated polymer is one of the most fast-developing research fields. It has been expending the area of application such as solar cells, thin film transistors, light-emitting diodes, chemical sensors, electro chromic devices, etc., and presenting steady improvement in its performance. Over the development, seminal progress in synthetic approaches and new conjugated polymers based on the progress have been playing the key role. However, challenges still remain in mass production and stability of conjugated polymer devices. New synthetic approaches will be one of the most important tools we can utilize. Reversely, new synthetic approaches of conjugated polymers can be inspired by a new direction of application. Thus, I expect this special issue will lead to synergetic impacts on research for synthesis and application of conjugated polymers in future.

I would like to cordially invite you to submit a manuscript to this special issue through the journal’s website. All types of manuscripts such as research articles, review articles, and perspectives are invited. The submission window will remain open until December 31, 2020. The submitted manuscripts will be fast track reviewed. More information for submission of manuscripts are available on the journal’s website.

Prof. Youngmin Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Synthesis mechanism of conjugated polymers
  • Architecture of conjugated polymers
  • External initiation of conjugated polymers
  • Conjugated block copolymers
  • Organic electronics
  • Organic photovoltaics
  • Organic thin film transistors
  • Sensors
  • Scalable processes

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
New Hybrid Copper Nanoparticles/Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Composite with Antibacterial Activity
Polymers 2021, 13(3), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13030401 - 27 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 918
Abstract
In the search for new materials to fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a hybrid composite from metallic copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) and a novel cationic π-conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) were designed, synthesized, and characterized. The CuNPs were prepared by chemical reduction in the presence of CPE, [...] Read more.
In the search for new materials to fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a hybrid composite from metallic copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) and a novel cationic π-conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) were designed, synthesized, and characterized. The CuNPs were prepared by chemical reduction in the presence of CPE, which acts as a stabilizing agent. Spectroscopic analysis and electron microscopy showed the distinctive band of the metallic CuNP surface plasmon and their random distribution on the CPE laminar surface, respectively. Theoretical calculations on CuNP/CPE deposits suggest that the interaction between both materials occurs through polyelectrolyte side chains, with a small contribution of its backbone electron density. The CuNP/CPE composite showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) bacteria, mainly attributed to the CuNPs’ effect and, to a lesser extent, to the cationic CPE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthetic Approaches and Applications of Conjugated Polymers)
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Article
Synthesis of π-Conjugated Polymers Containing Benzotriazole Units via Palladium-Catalyzed Direct C-H Cross-Coupling Polycondensation for OLEDs Applications
Polymers 2021, 13(2), 254; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13020254 - 14 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 860
Abstract
Four D-π-A conjugated polymers, namely P1–P4, which contain benzotriazole building blocks in their backbone as acceptor, are synthesized via palladium-catalyzed direct C-H cross-coupling polycondensation of 5,6-difluorobenzotriazole with different thiophene derivatives, including 3-octylthiophene, 2,2’-bithiophene, thieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxine, and 4,4-dioctyl-4H-silolo-[3,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene as donor units, respectively. Taking the polymer [...] Read more.
Four D-π-A conjugated polymers, namely P1–P4, which contain benzotriazole building blocks in their backbone as acceptor, are synthesized via palladium-catalyzed direct C-H cross-coupling polycondensation of 5,6-difluorobenzotriazole with different thiophene derivatives, including 3-octylthiophene, 2,2’-bithiophene, thieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxine, and 4,4-dioctyl-4H-silolo-[3,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene as donor units, respectively. Taking the polymer P1 as an example, the chemical structure of the polymer is demonstrated by 1H and 19F NMR spectra. The optical, electrochemical, and thermal properties of these polymers are assessed by UV–vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. DFT simulations of all polymers are also performed to understand their physicochemical properties. Furthermore, P1 and P2, which have relatively higher molecular weights and better fluorescent quantum efficiency than those of P3 and P4, are utilized as lighting emitters for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), affording promising green and red luminescence with 0.07% and 0.14% of maximum external quantum efficiency, respectively, based on a device with an architecture of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PTAA/the polymer emitting layer/TPBi/LiF/Al. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthetic Approaches and Applications of Conjugated Polymers)
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Review

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Review
Strain–Microstructure–Optoelectronic Inter-Relationship toward Engineering Mechano-Optoelectronic Conjugated Polymer Thin Films
Polymers 2021, 13(6), 935; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13060935 - 18 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1000
Abstract
Mechano-optoelectronic (MO) behavior indicates changes in optoelectronic properties in response to the applied mechanical deformation. The MO behavior can be employed to monitor the mechanical deformation of a targeted system by tracing its optoelectronic properties. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester [...] Read more.
Mechano-optoelectronic (MO) behavior indicates changes in optoelectronic properties in response to the applied mechanical deformation. The MO behavior can be employed to monitor the mechanical deformation of a targeted system by tracing its optoelectronic properties. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) blend thin films exhibited changes in direct current under tensile strain. Although optoelectronic properties and photovoltaic performance of P3HT/PCBM blends have been studied extensively and intensively, research required for MO properties has a fundamental difference from previous research mostly for solar cells. In research for MO systems, a greater extent of changes in optoelectronic properties under mechanical deformation is favorable. Herein, previous research for optoelectronic properties and mechanical properties of conjugated polymers will be reviewed from a perspective on MO properties. The microstructure of a conjugated polymer thin film plays a pivotal role in its optoelectronic properties and mechanical properties. Key parameters involved in the microstructure of conjugated polymer thin films will be addressed. A scalable process is required to broaden applications of MO systems. Potential challenges in the fabrication of MO conjugated polymer thin films will be discussed. Finally, this review is envisioned to provide insight into the design and manufacturing of MO conjugated polymer thin films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthetic Approaches and Applications of Conjugated Polymers)
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Review
Architectures and Applications of BODIPY-Based Conjugated Polymers
Polymers 2021, 13(1), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13010075 - 27 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1947
Abstract
Conjugated polymers generally contain conjugated backbone structures with benzene, heterocycle, double bond, or triple bond, so that they have properties similar to semiconductors and even conductors. Their energy band gap is very small and can be adjusted via chemical doping, allowing for excellent [...] Read more.
Conjugated polymers generally contain conjugated backbone structures with benzene, heterocycle, double bond, or triple bond, so that they have properties similar to semiconductors and even conductors. Their energy band gap is very small and can be adjusted via chemical doping, allowing for excellent photoelectric properties. To obtain prominent conjugated materials, numerous well-designed polymer backbones have been reported, such as polyphenylenevinylene, polyphenylene acetylene, polycarbazole, and polyfluorene. 4,4′-Difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY)-based conjugated polymers have also been prepared owing to its conjugated structure and intriguing optical properties, including high absorption coefficients, excellent thermal/photochemical stability, and high quantum yield. Most importantly, the properties of BODIPYs can be easily tuned by chemical modification on the dipyrromethene core, which endows the conjugated polymers with multiple functionalities. In this paper, BODIPY-based conjugated polymers are reviewed, focusing on their structures and applications. The forms of BODIPY-based conjugated polymers include linear, coiled, and porous structures, and their structure–property relationship is explored. Also, typical applications in optoelectronic materials, sensors, gas/energy storage, biotherapy, and bioimaging are presented and discussed in detail. Finally, the review provides an insight into the challenges in the development of BODIPY-based conjugated polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthetic Approaches and Applications of Conjugated Polymers)
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