Special Issue "Polymers and Lasers – Processing, Development and Applications"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Lech Sznitko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Chemistry, Advanced Materials Engineering and Modelling Group, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Wybrzeże Wyspiańskiego 27, 50-320 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: laser spectroscopy; organic lasers; laser physics; laser processing; photonics of disordered systems; nonlinear optics and holography
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays the utilization of polymers in optoelectronics, photonics and optics is rapidly growing. Scientists and engineers more often are choosing organic technologies to develop new and inexpensive devices of the future. This is mainly due to the good availability of polymers, their low costs and ease of manufacturing and processing. Most of future applications will demand materials that exhibit optically induced phenomena, including  nonlinear optical processes. This in turn requires the interaction of matter with strong laser light. Polymers are perfect for this role because they can be easily functionalized, either through the synthesis or by the addition of particular types of chromophores.  Laser light can be used to change and control the properties of polymers, in the processing of polymeric materials, and finally it can be generated by polymeric gain media. Thus the presented topic of  Polymers magazine Special Issue is of high importance in the field of material science, photonics and optoelectronics.

In addition, the polymeric technology is seen as the one of the easiest for commercialization. Currently, organic light-emitting diodes have already achieved great financial success. The market of organic photovoltaic cells is also rapidly growing. However, the commercialization of new devices based on polymer technologies is requiring further refinement, especially in case of processing techniques development, allowing to up-scale the manufacturing process from laboratory to industrial scale. 

This Special Issue will be devoted to most recent achievements in the field of macromolecules and laser light interaction, laser processing techniques of polymers and laser light generation in polymeric gain media.    

Dr. Lech Sznitko
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Organic laser
  • Laser ablation of polymers
  • Laser nano- and micro-structuring of polymers
  • Polymeric random laser
  • Nonlinear optics of polymers
  • Inverted opals
  • Polymeric photonic crystals
  • Organic optical sensors
  • Polymeric nano- and micro-fibers
  • Polymeric functional materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Tailoring the Random Lasing Properties by Controlled Phase Separation Process in PMMA:PVK Dye-Doped Polymeric Blends
Polymers 2021, 13(18), 3182; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13183182 - 19 Sep 2021
Viewed by 537
Abstract
This article describes the random lasing (RL) phenomenon obtained in a dye-doped, polymeric double-phase system composed of PMMA and PVK polymers. It shows how relative concentrations between mentioned macromolecules can influence lasing parameters of the resulting blends, including obtained emission spectra and threshold [...] Read more.
This article describes the random lasing (RL) phenomenon obtained in a dye-doped, polymeric double-phase system composed of PMMA and PVK polymers. It shows how relative concentrations between mentioned macromolecules can influence lasing parameters of the resulting blends, including obtained emission spectra and threshold conditions. We describe the influence of lasers’ composition on their morphologies and link them with particular RL properties. Our studies reveal that the disorder caused by phase separation can support the RL phenomenon both in the waveguiding and quasi-waveguiding regimes. Changing the relative concentration of polymers enables one to switch between both regimes, which significantly influences threshold conditions, spectral shift, number of lasing modes, and ability to support extended and/or localized modes. Finally, we show that a simple phase separation technique can be used to fabricate efficient materials for RL. Moreover, it enables the tailoring of lasing properties of materials in a relatively wide range at the stage of the laser material fabrication process in a simple way. Therefore, this technique can be seen as a fast, cheap, and easy to perform way of random lasers fabrication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers and Lasers – Processing, Development and Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Communication
Integrated Magnetohydrodynamic Pump with Magnetic Composite Substrate and Laser-Induced Graphene Electrodes
Polymers 2021, 13(7), 1113; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13071113 - 01 Apr 2021
Viewed by 431
Abstract
An integrated polymer-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pump that can actuate saline fluids in closed-channel devices is presented. MHD pumps are attractive for lab-on-chip applications, due to their ability to provide high propulsive force without any moving parts. Unlike other MHD devices, a high level [...] Read more.
An integrated polymer-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pump that can actuate saline fluids in closed-channel devices is presented. MHD pumps are attractive for lab-on-chip applications, due to their ability to provide high propulsive force without any moving parts. Unlike other MHD devices, a high level of integration is demonstrated by incorporating both laser-induced graphene (LIG) electrodes as well as a NdFeB magnetic-flux source in the NdFeB-polydimethylsiloxane permanent magnetic composite substrate. The effects of transferring the LIG film from polyimide to the magnetic composite substrate were studied. Operation of the integrated magneto hydrodynamic pump without disruptive bubbles was achieved. In the studied case, the pump produces a flow rate of 28.1 µL/min. while consuming ~1 mW power. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers and Lasers – Processing, Development and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Ti2CTx MXene as a Saturable Absorber for Passively Q-Switched Solid-State Lasers
Polymers 2021, 13(2), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13020247 - 13 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 672
Abstract
In this work, we successfully fabricated a transmissive saturable absorber (SA) with Ti2CTx MXene using the spin-coating method. By inserting the Ti2CTx saturable absorber into the diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) Nd:YAG laser, a stable passively Q-switched operation was [...] Read more.
In this work, we successfully fabricated a transmissive saturable absorber (SA) with Ti2CTx MXene using the spin-coating method. By inserting the Ti2CTx saturable absorber into the diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) Nd:YAG laser, a stable passively Q-switched operation was obtained near 1.06 μm. At a pump power of 4.5 W, we obtained the shortest pulse duration of 163 ns with a repetition rate of 260 kHz. The corresponding single pulse energy and peak pulse power were 3.638 μJ and 22.3 W, respectively. The slope efficiency and the optical conversion efficiency of the laser were 21% and 25.5%, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that Ti2CTx was used in the passively Q-switched solid-state lasers. This work demonstrates that Ti2CTx can be a promising saturable absorber for solid-state laser pulse generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers and Lasers – Processing, Development and Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Two-Photon Polymerization: Functionalized Microstructures, Micro-Resonators, and Bio-Scaffolds
Polymers 2021, 13(12), 1994; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13121994 - 18 Jun 2021
Viewed by 578
Abstract
The direct laser writing technique based on two-photon polymerization (TPP) has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Its remarkable characteristics, such as 3D capability, sub-diffraction resolution, material flexibility, and gentle processing conditions, have made it suitable for several applications in photonics and [...] Read more.
The direct laser writing technique based on two-photon polymerization (TPP) has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Its remarkable characteristics, such as 3D capability, sub-diffraction resolution, material flexibility, and gentle processing conditions, have made it suitable for several applications in photonics and biosciences. In this review, we present an overview of the progress of TPP towards the fabrication of functionalized microstructures, whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonators, and microenvironments for culturing microorganisms. We also describe the key physical-chemical fundamentals underlying the technique, the typical experimental setups, and the different materials employed for TPP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers and Lasers – Processing, Development and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop