Special Issue "Polymer-Based Flexible Printed Electronics and Sensors"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tae-il Kim

School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: flexible electronics; biomimetics; nanolithography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, flexible and printed electronics/sensors have drawn significant attention. The field for flexible and printed electronics is an interdisciplinary engineering field, which requires a comprehensive understanding of materials science, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and physics. Among them, new polymeric materials should be demonstrated to contribute to many practical applications, such as IoT, bio-heathcare devices.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together innovative developments in a broad spectrum of “Polymer Based-Flexible Electronics and Sensor” research. Papers addressing the wide range of aspects of this technology are sought, including, but not limited to, recent developments in new active and passive material components for flexible polymer electronics and sensors, fundamental and applied science issues underlying polymeric semiconducting materials, systems and their fabrication processes, technologies for process integration of flexible electronics and sensors, and studies on their applications.

Both review articles and original research papers are solicited. There is particular interest in papers envisioning innovative semiconducting polymers and their electronics/sensors that have not been possible with conventional rigid materials and form factors.

Prof. Dr. Tae-il Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymeric Electronics
  • Organic Electronics
  • Stretchable Electronics
  • Polymer based Electronic Skin
  • Polymeric Substrates for Deformable Electronics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A pH-Indicating Colorimetric Tough Hydrogel Patch towards Applications in a Substrate for Smart Wound Dressings
Polymers 2017, 9(11), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym9110558
Received: 10 October 2017 / Revised: 22 October 2017 / Accepted: 23 October 2017 / Published: 26 October 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3090 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The physiological milieu of healthy skin is slightly acidic, with a pH value between 4 and 6, whereas for skin with chronic or infected wounds, the pH value is above 7.3. As testing pH value is an effective way to monitor the status
[...] Read more.
The physiological milieu of healthy skin is slightly acidic, with a pH value between 4 and 6, whereas for skin with chronic or infected wounds, the pH value is above 7.3. As testing pH value is an effective way to monitor the status of wounds, a novel smart hydrogel wound patch incorporating modified pH indicator dyes was developed in this study. Phenol red (PR), the dye molecule, was successfully modified with methacrylate (MA) to allow a copolymerization with the alginate/polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel matrix. This covalent attachment prevented the dye from leaching out of the matrix. The prepared pH-responsive hydrogel patch exhibited a porous internal structure, excellent mechanical property, and high swelling ratio, as well as an appropriate water vapour transmission rate. Mechanical responses of alginate/P(AAm-MAPR) hydrogel patches under different calcium and water contents were also investigated to consider the case of exudate accumulation into hydrogels. Results showed that increased calcium amount and reduced water content significantly improved the Young’s modulus and elongation at break of the hydrogels. These characteristics indicated the suitability of hydrogels as wound dressing materials. When pH increased, the color of the hydrogel patches underwent a transition from yellow (pH 5, 6 and 7) to orange (7.4 and 8), and finally to red (pH 9). This range of color change matches the clinically-meaningful pH range of chronic or infected wounds. Therefore, our developed hydrogels could be applied as promising wound dressing materials to monitor the wound healing process by a simple colorimetric display, thus providing a desirable substrate for printed electronics for smart wound dressing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Flexible Printed Electronics and Sensors)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview 3D Printing Technologies for Flexible Tactile Sensors toward Wearable Electronics and Electronic Skin
Polymers 2018, 10(6), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym10060629
Received: 20 May 2018 / Revised: 3 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 7 June 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (6317 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
3D printing has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Over the past three decades, various 3D printing technologies have been developed including photopolymerization-based, materials extrusion-based, sheet lamination-based, binder jetting-based, power bed fusion-based and direct energy deposition-based processes. 3D printing offers unparalleled
[...] Read more.
3D printing has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Over the past three decades, various 3D printing technologies have been developed including photopolymerization-based, materials extrusion-based, sheet lamination-based, binder jetting-based, power bed fusion-based and direct energy deposition-based processes. 3D printing offers unparalleled flexibility and simplicity in the fabrication of highly complex 3D objects. Tactile sensors that emulate human tactile perceptions are used to translate mechanical signals such as force, pressure, strain, shear, torsion, bend, vibration, etc. into electrical signals and play a crucial role toward the realization of wearable electronics and electronic skin. To date, many types of 3D printing technologies have been applied in the manufacturing of various types of tactile sensors including piezoresistive, capacitive and piezoelectric sensors. This review attempts to summarize the current state-of-the-art 3D printing technologies and their applications in tactile sensors for wearable electronics and electronic skin. The applications are categorized into five aspects: 3D-printed molds for microstructuring substrate, electrodes and sensing element; 3D-printed flexible sensor substrate and sensor body for tactile sensors; 3D-printed sensing element; 3D-printed flexible and stretchable electrodes for tactile sensors; and fully 3D-printed tactile sensors. Latest advances in the fabrication of tactile sensors by 3D printing are reviewed and the advantages and limitations of various 3D printing technologies and printable materials are discussed. Finally, future development of 3D-printed tactile sensors is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Flexible Printed Electronics and Sensors)
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